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NOV/DEC 86 
VOL 3 NO. 1 


$3.00 


Thty Jt.;!/ /^rvUhJ 





BULK RATE 
U.S. Postage 
PAID 

Colton, OR 97017 
Permit No. 51 

POSTMASTER: 

PLEASE EXPEDITE DELIVERY 

MATERIAL 


AMERICA’S LARGEST TIMEX SINCLAIR MAGAZINE 


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SOUNDESIGN 
A NEU PROGRAMMING UTILITY FOR YOUR 2«68! 

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Conpletely nenu driven, using 

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The 


progran will let you test out sounds, change 
volune ( pitch, ooen or close_the sound channels 


with only 3 keys 




Sound 
you to be abI 


and the 
use and 
then! 


npier we nake then, the easier they are to 
the nore likely you will use and reconnend 

This one it NEU fron ARROU SOFTUARE, a conpany we 
hope to hear a lot fron in the nonths ahead! 

AT ONLY ♦12-95+il.5eph 
THIS ONE IS A MUST FOR ALL PROGR^RS! 

IT HILL SAVE YOU MORE THAN THAT IN TIME ALONE! 

naiwnPQTrN 

IS AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY FROM 
RHG ENTERPRISES 






• • • •' 







y»»>> 


w ^ w w m 















MAKE CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS OUT 

RHG 


TO 






1419 1/2 7TH STREET 
OREGON CITY, OR 97»45 
503/655^7484 
10 AM TILL 10 PM TUE-SAT 



•l* • .«-• • ♦ 

a* i A 4_ a «. 



OUR NEU CATALOG IS COMING! 

UE UANT YOU TO GET YOUR COPY! 


OUR NEU CATALK IS BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER! 


UE'IC ADDED NEU PRODUCTS IN ALL OF OUR OLD LIlCS 
AND ARE ADDING NEU LINES OF MEROMNDISE. 

OUR OLD LINES mUDE: 

TS 2068 « TS 1500 t TS 1000/ZX81 t QL 

OUR NEU LINES INCLUDE: 

COMPUTER FORMS t PAPER PRODUCTS t DISK DRMS 
DISK DRIVE CASES t POUER SUPPLIES t DISK DRIVE CABLES 
BLANK DISKS t BLANK VIDEO TAPES « CB RADIOS 

MUCH MORE TO COME!! 

BECAUSE OF TIE HIGHER COSTS OF PRODUCING MID HAILING A 
NEU CATALOG, UE ARE FORCED TO ASK, THAT, IF YOU ARE A 

SERIOUS CUSTim, AND UOULD LIKE TO RECEIlE ONE OF OUR 
NEU CATALOGS, YOU SEND US $2.00 TO COVER TtCSE COSTS. 
IN RETURN, HE UILL DEDUCT THE $2.00 OFF YOUR FIRST 
REGULMl ORDER! THAT UAY YOU DON'T ACTUALLY LOSE 
ANYTHING AND HAVE A LOT OF SAVINGS TO GAIN! 

JUST FILL IN THE INFORMATION BELOU AND SEND THIS FORM 
M.ONG UITH YOUR CHECK OR MONEY ORDER FOR 42.00 TO THE 

ADDRESS BaOU! 

AND THAT'S NOT ALL! 

IF YOU ENaOSE 12 LEGAL SIZED S.A.S.E.s UITH THIS FORM 
YOU UILL BE SURE TO RECEIVE OUR MONTHLY SPECIM.S, 
CLOSE-OUTS, NEU PRODUCT NOTICES AND CATALOG UPDATES. 
YOU UILL ALSO RECEIVE A COUPON GOOD FOR A $5.00 
DISCOUNT ON YOUR NEXT CATALX XDER! 

THAT UAY IT ACTUALLY COSTS YX NOTHING! 

DON'T HISS OUT! XDER TODAY! 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































NOV/DEC 86 


VOL 3 NO. 1 


rJ 



TIME DESIGNS MAGAZINE CO. 
29722 Hull Rd.'Colton. Oregon 97017 

(503) B24-2658 


TIME DESIGNS MAGAZINE Is published 
monthly and is Copyrighl 01986 by the Timm 
Doftlgnt Magaacine Company, Colton, Oregon 
97017. All rights reserved. 

Editor: Tim Woods 

Atstttant Editor: Stephanie Woods 

Editorial Aaalatant/Productlon: D.L. Woods 

Photography: 

(unless otherwise noted): Thomas Judd 
Printing by; Toad'I Litho Printing and Comp.» 
Oregon City, Oregon 97045 

SUBSCRIPTIONS: $15 a year for six issues (US 
funds oniy). No extra charge to Canadian 
subscribers. Aii other countries piease write for 
information on air mall rates. 

CUSTOMER SERVICE: Customer satisfaction Is 
our goal. For subscription service problems 
please write or call TIME DESIGNS. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Write or call to prevent 
delay of sevice. 

Reproduction of this magazine in whole or In 
part by any means without written permission is 
prohibited by law 

■ HOTICE: Contributofs to TiME DESfGNS am ibd^efxSem 
ot the TIME DESIGNS klAGAZfNE CO., ahd opinions ex- 
pressed hi the contents of the magedne a re not necessarftf 
those Ot the managemefit or its atfvertisers. Time Designs 

Mageiine Oo. wiii not be heMtiebte tor any damageor conse¬ 
quences resulting from ktstmctfons. assertions of fact, 
review of prodocis or corw^hfes provided in the magazine's 
content. ** 


GIVE A 

GIFT SUBSCRIPTION 

TO TIME DESIGNS 

* You’ll Help Spread Interest 
Sinclair Computers 

* We will Supply a FREE CARD 

SEND YOUR ORDER BEFORE 

DECEMBER 15th 
TO INSURE DELIVERY. 


The Folks Who Bring You 

TIME DESIGNS 










Tim Woods 
Editor 


anie Woods 
Assistant Editor 


Tim woods and Tom Judd/ 
Staff Photographer 












❖ 














Michael E, Carver 


Paul Bingham 


MiXe de Sosa 



wh?. 








«••• '-V 





.J. 



Williamson 


Duncan Teague 


Wes Brzozowski 









. vry 



•S 



% 






Hutchinson 


Syd Wyncoop 


Stan Lettike Earl V. Dunnington 


This being our 2nd Anniversary Issue and the start 
of our 3rd year of publication, l*m going to pass up the 
usual column featured here, and introduce you to some 
folks responsible for putting out TIME DESIGNS six times 
a year* Most of you know this is a “family" business, 
which not only eirploys both my wife and I, but also 
other family members and friends on a part time basis* 
TDM really wouldn't be possible without our great 
contributors-**! feel the very best around. Some of them 

have been with us since Volume One, 

Above you will find photo's of some of these people 
who you have read about, but this time you can tie a 
picture to a name* It*s all in fun, and at the same time 
gives them some deserving recognition* (I*ve even in¬ 
cluded my own "mug shot" for what it's worth*) There are 
many others who aren't pictured above, who are also 

regulars to our pages, such 
Fricke, Bill Ferrebee, Charles E. Goyette, Dick Wagner, 
Dennis Jurries, Dennis Silvestri, R. Lussier (as well as 

them next time, 

for the 


as: Tim Stoddard, Warren 


have to 



several others). We'll 

I look forward to working with everyone 
next six issues of TDM, and serving you our readers with 
the magazine "written by Sinclair enthusiasts-for 

Sinclair enthusiasts"* I also want to wish our writers, 
their families, as well as our entire readership*,* 


-Tim Woods 


































TDM TWO YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 



Remember Back When 


n 


by 

Fred Blechman 


Tim Woods has asked me to reminisce about the early 
days of the Timex Sinclair microcomputers- Ah, nostalgia 
time! The good ol* days,,,or were they? 

When you think about it, the "good ol* days" of the 
Timex computers only go back to April 1982. That was 
when Timex Computer Corporation, a wholly-owned sub¬ 
sidiary of the Timex Watch Company, announced to a 
stunned press that it had made an agreement with Sin¬ 
clair Research Ltd, (England) to produce and market the 
Timex Sinclair 1000, Timex-s version of Sinclair's 
2X81,,,and it was going to sell at 150,000 Timex North 
American retail outlets for only $99! That didn't 
happen, since most stores that sold Timex watches de¬ 
cided not to try to sell computers.,,but it was sure 
exciting to think about! 

But the genesis of the TS 1000 goes somewhat 
further back to when "Uncle Clive" Sinclair shocked the 
computer world in early 1980 by announcing the first 
under-$200 computer, the ZX80, This was an immediate hit 
in England and came to the U,S., mailorder only, in 
late 1980. This was followed by the 2X81, which was 
actually manufactured in Scotland by Timex. It sold for 
$150 assentiled, or $100 in kit form* The ZX81 quickly 
became the largest-selling computer in the world. 

I got my first ZX81 in early 1982, I ordered a kit 
for $100# but they had more assembled units than kits, 
so they apologized for sending me an assembled unit! 

I had already cut my computing teeth on a Radio 
Shack TRS-80 Model I 4k with Level I BASIC, which I had 
upgraded to 16k with Level II BASIC language, I had 
written one book for Hayden Publishing ("Programs For 
Beginners On The TRS-SO") and many magazine articles, so 
the 2X81 was not my first micro...but it quickly got my 
attention. 

It was FUN to program the 2X81 in Sinclair BASIC, 
which was much more powerful than the TRS-80 Level I 
BASIC. Because there was only Ik of RAM, and much of 
that was devoted to the screen, there was not much 
memory left for a program...making the challenge much 
greater. The graphics were limited, but easy to use. 

1 started writing articles about the 2X81 and the 
Timex Sinclair 1000, Since they were identical, except 
that the TS lOCX) had a 2k RAM instead of Ik, everything 
I did with the 2X81 worked on the TSIOOO, Furthermore, 
by adding the 16k RAMpack to a 2X81, it was the same as 
a TS lOCX) with a RAMpack, In fact, I never did get a TS 
1000, By the time they were available, I had two ZXSls 

with RAMpacksI 

I recall the difficulty in getting a printer in the 
early days# before the Timex Sinclair 2040, Sinclair put 
one out in England for about $100. I don't even remember 
what they called it-, but it put out so much radio¬ 
frequency interference that the FCC banned it in this 
country. It used an electrostatic process that vaporized 
a thin aluminum coating to expose the black surface on a 
carbon-coated paper roll. I ordered one of these little 
printers from Gladstone Electronics, via Canada* The 


import paperwork, shipping and tariff cost about $35! It 
was strange, but gave an acceptable 32-columii printout 
that duplicated every dot on the screen* To do that on 
many of today's micros takes special graphic screen dump 
programs! 

My first 2X/TS-oriented article was in the Sept/Oct 
1982 issue of SYNC Magazine, I subsequently wrote 20 
other articles covering the ZX81, TS 1000, TS 1500, 
TS 2068, Spectrum, and QL for other magazines.,,Elec¬ 
tronic Fun, CES Daily, Microcomputing, TODAY (Compu¬ 
Serve), Timex Sinclair User, Computer Shopper, Computers 
& Electronics, Computer Trader and Modem Electronics. 
My last "Timex" article was a 7-page hands-on review of 
the Sinclair QL in the June 1985 issue of Modern Elec¬ 
tronics. 

Along the way, I wrote the book, "Timex Sinclair 
2068 Beginner/Intermediate Guide" for Howard w. Sams. It 
is now out of print, but available from the E. Arthur 
Brown Company- They also sell my friend Jeff Mazur's 
book, "Timex Sinclair 2068 Intermediate/Advanced Guide", 
also published by Sams, which picks up where mine leaves 
off. Writing that book was a real challenge, since I 
didn't have a TS 2068 Personal Color Computer! Dan Ross, 
the man running Timex Ccwrputer at the time, made an 
arrangement for Jeff and me to each have a Sinclair 
Spectrum, on which the TS 2068 was based. We also got 
some advance information, but had to make some educated 
guesses. Sue Mahoney and George Grimm at Timex were very 
helpful...thanks, wherever you are today... 

The real irony was that my completed book manu¬ 
script went to the publisher in early August of 1983-.. 
and later that same day Federal Express delivered the 
first TS 2068 I had ever seen! Luckily, after checking 
out the actual 2068, I only had to change one paragraph 
in my manuscript. 

As it turned out, the computer had been delayed so 
long my book hit the streets before the computer-..and 
Timex closed down the conputer division just a few 
months later. What a shame! A great little computer 
caught in a web of bad engineering and marketing de¬ 
cisions. 

In their defense, Timex management had a host of 
problems with the real value of a "home computer" being 
challenged, and price wars created by the competition 
forcing profits too low. Add the unreality of trying to 
effectively sell a device as complex and unfriendly as a 
conputer in drug stores, and the stage was set for re¬ 
percussion. Timex was not the only micro manufacturer to 
fall on bad times. It just seems, however, that if they 
had "hung in there" about another six months, the 
superior features of the TS 2068 would have become 
known- 

What have I done since? Well, I've had other 
computers in my collection-*-TRS-80 Model III (two of 
those), TRS-80 Model 4P (two of those), Coleco ADAM, 
Radio Shack MC-10 Microcolor Computer, Sanyo HBC 555-2, 
Apple lie, and just recently got an IBM PC/XT clone. 

I've written three more books since my Timex 2068 
book, and over 200 computer-related magazine articles. 
"The ADAM Beginner £ Intermediate Guide", a book written 
for Sams, was cancelled after acceptance and editing, 
due to the fall of the ADAM, My "Sanyo Beginner £ Inter¬ 
mediate Guide" and "Apple IIc - An Intelligent Guide" 
were published by CBS Conputer Books, just before they 


2 















TDM TWO YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 


abandoned the corcputer book market. I've personally sold 
over 1000 copies of the Sanyo book, since like the Timex 
machines,,.it has many devoted users, 

I hated the Apple lie, the ADAH was "unspeakable", 
but I love the Sanyo! It offers the ease and power of 
prograjiniing remindful of the TS 2068, but with two 
built-in disk drives and 48,000 pixels on the screen 
(640 X 200), each in any of eight colors! Wow! 

Itiank goodness I*ve got my Amway Emerald Direct 
Distributorship to support my computerholic tendency! 


Also, well over 1000 Amway Product Distributors have 
purchased my $100 "AMBIZ-PAK" of 10 programs for the IBM 
PC/Clones, TRS-80 Models III/4/4P/4D, and the Sanyo KBC 
550 series. 

I'm pretty much out of the Timex environment now, 
and will not be writing about the QL* However, I can 
well understand the fascination and dedication many of 
you hold for the Sinclair and Timex machines. As I 
recall, at one time Timex used ads with the slogan "The 
POWER is in your hands!" May the POWER be with you... 


5 \ 



ll n. II 


Nowak’s Letter Gets Response 

nolt: box ha* be^n qwitt iall Iht pCL6t 

two months due to a fettex and eequeit we pabtiAhe.d in 
the Si.pt/0ct. *i6 ojJ TPM, on page 3. To pa^p/ixa^e 

Mx* hfomk*^ tettex, fie xegue^ted a ihofit pitog^am on. 

Jiout-cne that woufd by-paid tkt jwofttton and dump dintetty 
to tkz pnintin doing dimpfe cojwputationd, Wkllt tbe 
andwex appiam to be dimpte, dueb a* the ude o^ the 
1 PR I Ml cojmiand, hene id what dome o^ oun neadexd come up 

And thanfed to everyone who toofe the time, to mitt. 

Dear Hm, 

In the Sept/Oct 1986 issue Michael J. Kowak asked 
for a way to have the 2068 print to the printer instead 
of the screen. One simple method, which will work in the 
immediate mode or as a program line, is: OPEN 12, 

The “12" part refers to PRINT and LIST cofnmands. The 
refers to the 2040 printer ("S“ would mean screen 
this syntax). Hence, PRINT or LIST will subsequently 
to the printer instead of the screen, LLIST, 

and lower screen messages will still appear 
the screen, CLOSE 12 gets things back to normal. 
Opening and closing files in this way was not 
mentioned^in the 2068 User Manual (more Timex unfinished 
business)! but it can be a useful feature* Listing 11 is 
an example 1n which channel f4 is used to give a screen 
or printer option for the output, I chose #4 because #1, 
#2, and #1 are reserved for INPUT, PRINT/LIST, and 
LPRINT/LLIST commands, respectively. It's worth ex¬ 
perimenting with! 

Sincerely, 

Larry Dietrich 
Blanca, CO 

100 REM EXAMPLE OF DEVICE IKDEPENDEKT OUTPUT 
110 LET OETKEY=1000 

120 PRINT "Output to Screen or Printer? 
or P>*** * 

130 GO SUB GETKEY 

140 IF I*<>”S" and 1*0"a" AND ISO"?" AND ISO"p" 
GO TO 130 
150 OPEN #4,IS 
200 REM BODY OF PEDGRAK 

L=1 TO 10 

#4jTAB <L<10>iLj" squared = "jL*L 

230 NEXT L 

240 PRINT *"DONE": REM THIS PRINTS TO SCREEN 
250 STOP 

1000 REM GETKEY SUB 
1010 LET I*«IHKEy* 

1020 IF 1*=^"" THEN GO TO 1010 
1030 RETURN 



THEN 


LISTING T 


1 squared ^ 1 

2 squared ~ 4 

3 squared ■= 9 

4 squared - 16 

5 squared *= 25 

6 squared > 36 

7 squared * 49 

B squared ^ 64 
9 squared = 81 
10 squared ^ 100 


To the Editor, 

In response to Mr* Nowak's Tetter in TDM Sept/Oct *86 
issue--the enclosed program works well on the 2068 and 
TS 1000 (using the proper “to the power" symbol). It can 
be enhanced by putting in an entry counter with CS and B 
tabbed to other locations and/or reversing the position 
of CS and B, The base program is: 10 INPUT C 

20 PRINT C or LPRINT C 
30 GOTO 10 

The value of C is calculated and printed (Lprinted) as a 
single value. The entry prompted by an L cursor is not 
printed (Lprinted) and is “lost", 

W,S, Gray Jr, 

West Caldwell, NJ 

1 REM. .EvaLu#tors , 

2 REM .LINES 1,2*3,4,51, 

,101 WOT NECESSflPy. 

3 LPRINT ■INPUT","ANSUEP 

4 LPPINT " 

20 INPUT CN 

30 IF THEN GO TO 100 

40 LET B=UPL Ci 

50 LPPINT C*,TPB 

51 LPPINT 


P i « t 

Iri 


V f ■ I 


Jt 


IP 


80 GQ To 20 

100 LPPINT 

101 LPPINT + + ^ 

102 STOP 


3+8= 11 


8+10= 45 
8/9 = 


CB/4i+ll= 12.25 


3 


To the Editor, 

Regarding Mr, Nowak's letter: There is a very simple 
solution to this, but it has two small drawbacks. After 
turning on the 2068, type in: 

POKE 26692,80 : POKE 26697,80 (Enter) 

Now everything that would normally go to the screen will 
go to the printer. Drawback #1- No program line or im¬ 
mediate command can be entered that is longer than 32 
characters (the length of the printer buffer). Longer 
program lines can be loaded from tape, before or after 
the Poke’s, or typed in before the Poke's. Drawback 12- 
wit h an immediate command like: PRINT 2+2 (Enter! the 
answer (4) will overwrite the "P" in the word PRINT in 
the printer buffer before it is sent to the printer,.*so 
type in: PRINT 2+2 and then hold down the space bar to 
fill the printer buffer. When the printer starts to 
print, press enter and the answer (4) will print on the 
next line. 

Yours Truly, 

P* Aylesworth 
Bradford, Ontario 
Canada 























ALSO AVAILABLE FOR THE T/S 2068 


ftCNT 

^IRN 

3«« 

FCe 

306 


a7s 

330 


3ae 

las 

CCCCTV, 

1 la 

110 




;.MD19V * 

□o 

as 

FOOD 

las 

116 


0« 

as 

INSRC. 

■44-1. 

441 

CLTH3, 

les 





-1 « 1964 


4 





















Goyette’s “Ski” and “Cavern” A Hit 

Dear Ttm, 

I found "SKI" (TOW-July/August 86) by Charles E. 
Goyette, to be a fantastic game. The only problem was 
that the person with the highest score for a game was 
not always listed as being the winner. Changing H$ to SS 
in line SOO seems to correct this*" 

Sincerely, 

Kenneth Fracchia 
Buffalo, NY 


Dear Time Designs, 

I have enjoyed both "CAVERN" and "SKI" by Charles 
E, Goyette. They both act and react faster than my 
fingers can manipulate the keys. I did however, make a 
slight change in "SKI*. I changed the trees that look 
like "bugs" to trees that look like trees with: 

9000 OBTfl 1,123,1,123,0,192,3,19 
2,7,224. , 7,224., 1,123,1,123 

This makes a nice pine tree with the addition of color, 
*JNK 4", in line 1100. 

For what it's worth. 


Sincerely, 

Richard 6. HcMahill 
Washington, DC 


Mathematics 

Dear Sir, 

Readers of TOM might be interested in the following 
equalities produced by my 2068. Other such relationships 
can be obtained by use of the program shown on page 232 
of Laurie Buxton's book, "Mathematics For Everyone", 

PI - 103993/33102 * 0 
EXP 1 - 49171/18089 - 0 
SQR 2 - 66922/47321 « 0 

SQR 3 - 70226/40545 - 0 

SQR 10 ^ 168717/53353 » 0 
.125 - 1/8 « 5,8207661E-11 
1.3 - 13/10 * 4,6566129E-10 

Sincerely yours, 

Howard R. Wilkerson 

Greenville, SC 


Request for LARKEN Help, etc. 


Dear Sir, 

I am writing in the hopes that you may be able to 
help me with a few questions. First of all 1 understand 
that there is a version of Prologue available for the 
Spectrum. 1 have searched all present and back issues of 
ZX Computing, Your Sinclair and Sinclair User that I own 
and could find no mention of it. I am hoping that you or 
one of your readers might know of the program I am 
talking about. 

Secondly, 1 am hoping that someone might be able to 
help me with some conversion problems. 1 am trying to 
convert some of the other languages for the TS 2068 and 
the Spectrum onto the LARKEN disc drive system. I have 
Abersoft FORTH, Hi*Soft C, Hi-Soft Pascal and YS Mega- 
basic which I would like to make full compatable with 
the Larken system. So far, I have been able to put the 
main Basic loaders and machine code onto disc, but I do 
not know how to convert Save-Load routines within each 

■ .. 5 


language to save and load from disc. Perhaps someone has 
already solved the problem and could offer me some help, 
I thank you for your time and trouble. 


Sincerely, 

David Solly 
OTSDG Librarian 
Ottawa, Ontario 


Editotti I have, no aeijctence to a "Ptofoguc" pao- 

£o>t cAe Spec-tJium, but aomc ocWa "Spcccy-pAcCe" may 
pjioucde tht aiiau/ea. A a yoan conueaa^on 

p^obfcjna mitk tht LAZKtH dcac dacve cnCea^ace, it aounda 
CcAc you may have an eaaCcea veaacort oi tkn LARKED PPS. 

I have been in contact with La^^y Kenny (a.b.a.; Lanktn 
ttcctKOnick\ and Ae mentioned ^Aa^ a new t06i VOS ia 
availabtt on d<ac CAat Aaa impn&vtd iCAV/SAVE comnanda 
(auppoa-teng Aaaaya, Eaa<c Code), and ofao FORMAT, CAT, 
ERASE and OPEW^ commanda. iaaay otao men^coned that Ae 
wilt bc^in woaA on o^jea^ng ^Ae DOS [wA^cA a^a Spectaujn 
compatible} on a cahlxidge, tktxeioxe a^inq no computex 
RAM. Hold on to you'i aeat on thli one>**it will kaoe the 
WMI aave £eatuxe. Tkii will allow you to do "anap aAoi" 
aavea like -tAa^ on the John Qllgtn Vi6c Intexiace* I 
wouEd auggeaE EAa-C anyone aegcUa-eng inoamaEion on new 
lARKEW impaouemenEa wxitt tot Laxken EEecEaonica, RRiZ 
Wauan, Dntaaio, Canada 


“Pigskin Picks” 


Dear Tim, 


I am sending my check for another enjoyable year of 
TOM...the only real connection 1 have with the TS world, 
and I always look forward to receiving my TDM. I have 
enclosed a small football prediction program that I 
wrote. The program will average about 6Sl correct over 
the whole season. 

1 am also wanting to start a Users Group in the 
Bee County Area. If I can start one, it will be called 
"Bee County Timex Sinclair Users Group*- B.t.T.S., and 
if it is possible I would like to give the members that 
don't have computers a ZXBl or TS 1000 for joining. I 
would like to hear from other TS users for some input on 
this subject. 


Sincerely, 

Tom Proffitt 
706 Morales St, 
Beeville, TX 78102 


Ediloxt "Ptadfeitt P-cefed" wad im, buE my Eeam EooJfeed judE 
ad bEeak ad I keyed in yout pxogxam (bcEEca Eucb 

^04 mt nexE yeat, t guEddl. Hope you geE a udetd gtoup 
0 ^^ EAc gxoand. A ixee compatex cd Aa^d to beat* 


1 REH ”BYrTOM PROFFITT 

ORTE:1932 

PLACE r BEEylLLE,TEXAS 

2 REM “Pi 95 Kin Picks" can all 
o t>€ used for Basket bail. It uior 
ks best after the fourth oaiTie. " 
Kol to be used for gambling if g 
ou ujant to keep your money i" 

3 BORDER 1 PAPER 1: INK 7: C 
LS : POKE 23609,70 

10 print tab 3;"PIGSKIN PICKS" 

11 PRINT 

■» it # « * « 4 4 4 4 a # " 

50 INPUT “'enter 1st. team “'ja$ 
55 REM ENTER OFFENSE-POINTS 

140 input “points«for ■;c 

150 REM ENTER DEFENSE-POINTS 
160 INPUT “POINTS-RGAINST ";d 
170 INPUT "enter games played '* 
j e 

200 INPUT "enter 2 nd.team fs 
255 REM ENTER OFFENSE-POINTS 
290 INPUT "POINT3-rOR ";i 
300 REM ENTER DEFENSE-POINTS 
320 input "POINTS-AOAINST ";j 
3S0 INPUT "enter games Played " 

'460 LET t=c/€ 

470 LET u =d /€ 

430 LET r=i /k 
490 LET s=i/k 

500 LPRINT as," “;INT U+SJ /2 
510 LPRINT ft;" "iINT fu+rJ /2 
520 LPRINT 
530 LPRINT 
540 GO TO 10 









TS COMPUTERFEST II Plans Aired 

While May is months away, plans and groundwork for 
the Second Annual Mid West TS Computerfest continue* The 
’’main event" this time will be held in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, on May 2nd and 3rd- It is being planned and 
hosted by nearly all of the representatives of the 
highly successful TS Computerfest held in Cincinnati 
last year, including Chairman, Prank Davis of Peru, 
Indiana. 

Time Designs has been in contact with many of the 
dealers who attended the first show, and the over¬ 
whelming response has been "we'll be there againi". In 
fact several dealers who were unable to attend last year 
are definetly coining this time. Most preliminary figures 
estimate that the Indianapolis Computerfest will have 
double the attendance this time around, with perhaps as 
many as a thousand, now that the word is getting out- 

Interested parties can write to Mr. Davis at: 513 
East Main Street, Peru, IN 46970, for further details* 
Be sure and plan now to leave the first weekend in May 
open*,,you won't want to miss the Timex Sinclair "event 
of the year"! 


New SPECTRUM Off To Giant Start 
American Travelers Abroad Report on PC Show 

American Timex Sinclair distributors Rob and Det^ie 
Curry of Curry Computer and John Warburtori of Sunset 
Electronics attended the annual Personal Computer Show 
in Olympia, Great Britain, the first weekend of Sep¬ 
tember. The well-attended showing featured among other 
things, the premier of the Amstrad/Sinclair Spectrum 
128k+2. Many thanks go to Mr, Warburton who thoughtfully 
picked up an extra brochure, which is pictured to the 
right, for Time Designs readers. The new Spectrum which 
replaces the previous 128k computer released six months 
ago by Sir Clive, offers both a professional full-travel 
keyboard and an integrated cassette recorder. It also 
has on-board twin joystick ports that use the Sinclair 
Interface 2 protocols (non Atari-type). Gone is the 
traditional black Sinclair look, for a new grey color. 

It was curious that Commodore for the most part 
was absent at the show, while both Amstrad and Atari had 
huge displays- The Atari section featured many after- 
market coirpanies, but all were integrated into the main 
Atari section with corresponding displays and decor... 
now that's company support! Meanwhile, Amstrad launched 
the new PC1512, an inexpensive IBM PC clone that is 
already receiving extremely rave reviews from the press. 
Watch for this one, it is rumored that it is coming to 
the U*S. 

There were many software ccxrpanies in attendance 
including an outlandish display by BEYOND, which rep¬ 
licated the bridge of the star ship Enterprise---a 
gimmick to announce their coming program, "Star Trek". 
Their were many other Spectrum related booths, and even 
some for the seemingly ill-fated Sinclair QL, such as 
the London-based support group. Quanta, 

The Curry's stated that software and hardware 
"deals" struck at the PC Show, will greatly benefit U,S, 
Sinclair consumers in the coming months. 


“All The News Fit To Print” 

ARCTAN COMPUTER VENTURES or Northampton, England, 
is an excellent source of support for the ZX81 or TS 
1000 computers. The part software company and 2X81 
magazine publishers have a five page brochure available, 
Arctan Computer Ventures (or A,C,V.), offers over a 
dozen different software titles, many of which are games 
(but also some utilities,..like a Z80 Disassembler), 
The ARCTAN 2X81 Users Club has now published five ex¬ 
clusive magazines for ZX81 users. For complete infor¬ 
mation and prices, write to; A.C.V,, 1 Foxwell Square, 
Southfielda, Northhampton NN3 5AT, England, 

Many months ago, we reported on the E* Arthur Brown 
Company of Alexandria, Minnesota, purchasing the ex¬ 
clusive U.S, publishing rights to England's popular 
computer telecommunications book, THE HACKER'S HANDBOOK. 
Now, Eben Brown (of E, Arthur Brown) reported to Time 
Designs, that the book is in it's second printing here, 
Hugo Cornwall, the author of the hacker's guidebook, 
made a scheduled appearance in San Francisco, California 
for a lecture at the "Hacker's 2,0 Conference", on the 
25 and 26th of October, Mr. Cornwall is a noted in¬ 
ternational expert on modem "hacking". For information 
and prices on "The Hackers Handbook", write to E. Arthur 





































The Hacker's Handbook 


Brown at: 3404 Pawnee Dr., Alexandria, MN 56308, or call 
(612) 762-8847- 


DUNGEON OF YMIR Version Three is here* The all new 
high resolution maze game is available now for the ZXSl 
or TS 1000 that has both a 16k RAM pack and an 8k CMOS 
(static) RAM board such as the popular "Hunter NVM" 
board. Incidentally, if you have a copy of "Thrust" by 
the Weymil Corp,, you are already set up to run Dungeon 
Of Ymir V3* FXirther details on this mega—game and other 
fine products for your ZX/TS, write to: Fred Nachbaur 
[Silicon Mountain Conputers], C-12, Mtn. Stn, Group Box, 
Nelson, B.C, VIL 5P1. 

Improvements on the "tried and true** appears to be 
the trend this month. In the May/June 86 issue of TDM, a 
program called "Money Machine" was mentioned for those 
that like word/thinking type games* We said that it re¬ 
sembled the TV game show "Wheel of Fortune", Now, the 
author has taken the program one more step,*.and we 
can now say that MONEY MACHINE II is a Wheel of Fortune 
clone. This should sell a lot of copies, as the TV show 
has gained a tremendous following* A lot of detail has 
been incorporated in this 2068 program, including a 
Vanna White ("Banna Brite" in the program, to protect 
author Herb Bowers from any legal implications) sprite 
that turns the letters. Play is conducted as in the show 
and up to three players can participate. Libraries of 

additional puzzles will be released periodically, but 
the 250 that come with the program should keep you and 
your friends up all night playing this one. Very good 
graphics and sound* Price is $15 from ABBA Soft, 2588 
Woodshire Cir*, Chesapeake, VA 23323, 



There are 2 



Banna Brite turns the letters* 


We've been impressed with all of the new stuff 
coming out of RMG Enterprises (1419 1/2 7th St*, Oregon 
City, OR 97045) these days* New software titles include 
S0UNDESIO3 (a utility for easy development of sound 
effects in your 2068 programs) and TRACER (a machine 



code utility for the 2068 that was inspired by a feature 
on the Sinclair QL. Interrupts allow the user to witness 
the actual execution of BASIC programs, as program lines 
are simultaneously displayed,) RMG also has excellent 
prices on disk drives, cases and power supplies, and 
many other items for the ccxfputer hobbyist, A new 
catalog is available for $2 (your $2 is deducted from 
your first order.,,so actually you pay nothing for the 
their catalog). Write for a copy, 

Pete Fischer and Steve Ishii have put together the 
TS GUIDE TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS, which lists BBS phone 
numbers, hardware and software, and many useful tips* To 
obtain your own copy, write to P.O. Box 2002, Tenpe, A2 
85281, 

Have you blown your 2068*s SCLD chip? Symptoms in¬ 
clude video display problems, excessive LOAD and SAVE 
troubles, problems with internal clock timing and key¬ 
board decoding, and others, you may have a faulty SCLD 

that needs to be replaced* You could send your 2068 in 
for repairs, but you can now (with some difficulty) 

replace your own* You may, or may not be aware that the 
SCLD is the only chip in your computer that isn't 
available commercially. Through the efforts of the 
Capitol Area Timex/Sinclair Users Group (P,0, Box 725, 
Bladensburg, MD 20710), which bought a large supply of 
them from the Timex computer factory in Portugal, you 
can now obtain these custom chips, C,A.T,S is offering 
them for $20 each ppd* 

Knighted Coirputers, 707 Highland st-, Fulton, NY 
13069 (phone 315-593-8219) has obtained the 0-S, rights 
to market TOMAHAWK, a combination helicopter flight 
simulation program and arcade game* Knighted has con¬ 
verted this popular Spectrum program to the stock Timex 
Sinclair 2068* The helicopter is a U,S* Army AH-64A 
APACHE, and features a 3D cockpit/window display, and 
use of both 2068 joystick ports! Price: $16,95. 



TOMAHAWK has landed 
on u*s* shores. 


A new ROM resident Monitor/Disassembler is now 
available for the Sinclair QL called ROMON* This comes 
from Meta Media Productions, 726 West 17th, Vancouver, 
B.C,, Canada V52 1T9, ROMON 1.21 sports a host of fea¬ 
tures not usually found in a monitor. These include the 
display of SuperBASIG Functions & Procedures currently 
resident, the display of Jobs resident including the 
starting address and length of the job, the display of 
the major system variables and SuperBASIG variables, and 
more, in addition to the usual monitor functions of 


memory display and modification, register display, ect. 
ROMON is supplied on a ROMcard for the QL ROM port. Less 
than Ik of RAM is used for the storage of Monitor Vari¬ 


ables. Write for pricing and further information. 

Zebra Systems Inc., has just purchased the entire 
remaining stock of the popular SOFTSYNC line of 2068 
software including the ZEUS ASSEMBLER, 

DISASSS1BLER, Personal Accountant and 
Zebra is now selling these commercial 


ZEUS MONIOm/ 



games. 

quality programs 

at a special price in time for the Holidays (stuff 
stockings with these!). Consult their catalog or 

for further details, or write to: 78-06 Jamaica Ave., 
Woodhaven, NY 11421* 


your 









































707 Highland Street 


FULTON, NY 13069 


(315) 593-8219 




Software Peripherals 




ONLY THE BRAVEST FLY.... 





TOMAHAWK 

TOIUIH Is I reil'tiK Ell^bt 
sluUtioD based Dpoi tbe IIS UIIT U-(tl 

ASiCII Uvasced Stack It 11 copter - tbe 
■eaiest, deadliest coabat helicopter 
ever to tile the sties! Its specUllted 
job Is to bsot tasks aid destroy 
aiytblip that qets U its vay. the 
Apache fas biilt specifically to fl^ht 
aid sotvlre, si^ht aad day, In the thick 
of the battlefield. 

flying a real helicopter is a denaidlnq 
task, leqnltUq tralili^ aid practice - 
partlcilarly grand attack. TOAilAIK 
gives yoi this challeige. Cllab lito 

yoir cockpit aid prepart for 
take-off.... 

F I A 1 If 11 1 : Spectacilar ID real 
world display *Filly aerobatic Ivithin 
liilts of the real helicopter) *Groeid 
attack A air-to-air ioterceptioi *Ovet 
TttO groiid featiies *lay/light vlsiei 
systens *Cloady coiditiois, crossvinds i 
tirbileice *Doppler lavigatioi A target 
tracking systei 'Laser gilded liisiles, 
plus rockets I lln chali gia 'Selectloi 
of traliiig and coabat ilssloos 
'lapressive solid effects 'Pilot ratligs 
- Tralaee to Ace 'Bses lOTI TSlIit 
joystick ports! 

1111*1211 


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<pk of e) Item 11158 


$ 11.95 



TRAHSPORM BOX 


- HOLDS 20 CARTGS. 
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5 1 2 K R A.M 
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This &12K card increases the 
QL*3 memory to 640K o£ Rando 
Access Hemory. Uith this memory 
expansion you can take full 
advantage of your QL* Our 
memory board la equipped with 
thru-porting so that you will 
still be able to connect a disk 
drive interface. This is 
another high quality product 
from KNIGHTED COMPUTERS. 

Item il0£9 $199.SS 


HARDWARE FOR TOUR QL COMPUTER 



QL PRINTER 

80 CPS, 9 PIN DOT MATRIX, AND 
COMES WITH LQ MODE (LETTER 
aUALITY) AND CABLE TO HOOK UP 
DIRECTLY TO YOUR QL SERIAL PORT- 

Item I 1198 S199.00 

QL PRINTER RIBBON 

Item I 1180 $ 11.99 



VISA 



Sinclair QU 





T 


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These top quality dual disk 
drive units have their own power 
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very attractively encased. Now, 
cut your data storage costs by 
more than half. These drives 
are single sided, double density 
drives and format out at 180K 
per side - with just two disks, 
you'll have data storage capa¬ 
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convienience of having two 
drives available at your 
command- INCLUDES: CABLE AMD 
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QL PSION PROGRAMS ARE ALREADY 
PUT ONTO TWO DISKS FOR YOU. 

ITEM# 1210 $249.95 

3" DISKS (for above) 

Hard plastic encased top grade 
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disk protector, and write pro¬ 
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ITEMI 1211 $ 4.50 

(BOX OF 10) ITEM# 1212 






COMPUTER - 

With power supply, manual, 
dual microdrives. Data-base, 
Wordprocessor, spreadsheet, 
and Business Graphics programs 

Item 11140 $209.95 





MastorCard 




$u.» 



















































TO T I ME DESZOIMS OAOK 

COMF>Il_eO BV BXNQMAM 




Time Designs Nov/Dec '84 Vnl i. No- 1 

TS2050 Modem announced. Spectrum Emulator announced, 
U-S-A- QL released, 2060 Tech Manual released. 
Recoton Cassettes, '*Rise Fall i-F Timex Computer 
Corp.*', 206Q Software Directory, Portable TS 
project, BASIC languages, 2068 Music 1, 2068 Tasword 

11 review 

Time Designs Jan/Feb SS Vol 1, No, 2 

MT Sprit Printer (TS2O0O), Comparing Data Base 
Services, TS Modems, 2068 MTERM II review, TSIOOO 
S( 2068 Screen storage prgrm, 2060 *'Ant Attack'* 
review, ROMSWITCH review. Static Discharge Bracelet, 
2060 BREAKlng and SAVE, 2068 '♦Great Game/Graphi cs 
Show*' review, 2068 "Compass** compiler review, 2060 
"Straits of Hormuz "S("Exec Clue" review 

Time Designs Mar/Apr *83 Vol 1, No- 3 

Timex Zt Dave Higginbottom, TS User Group Directory, 
2060 Text Entry/recall in M,C., TSIOOO DATA/READ, 
2068 House Payment prgrm, TSIOOO "Basload" & '*Superb- 
tape'* reviews. Guidelines on Over-seas Ordering, 

2068 Z—LINK t/F review, 2068 OMNI—EMU review, Spctrm 
"White Lightning'*, *'Lords of Midnight'* & "DRAxx 
BLUFF" reviews 

Time Designs May/Jun 85 Vol 1, No, 4 

User Group Update, 01iger/Kingsley Disk I/F 
announced, TS206B returning via Portugal, TSIOOO 
"Intro to Computer Control'", 2060 M-C, joystick 
routine, 2060 Graphics Problem, TV to Monitor kit, 
Tasword II Tips, 2068 Pro/File review, 2060 "Bill's 
Coupon Magic" Se "Dealer's Den" reviews, Damco*s 
Spectrum Wafadrive review 

Time Designs Jul/Aug '05 Vol 1, No. 5 

Timex Network, Softaid hunger relief. Users Group 
Update, 2068 Graphics, 2060 Tlc*"Tac-Toe prgrm, 

TS 1000/2060 Alphabetizer prgrm, TSIOOO Set RAMTOP, 
TSIOOO BK upgrade £< Bank Switching reviews, Aerco 
FD—68 2066 Disk 1/F review, 2068 Zebra—Talker 
review, 2060 "Night Gunner"Grade Book" Spectrum 
"Deus ex Machlna", *’Paiamarama'* h *'Sherlock" reviews 



Time Designs Sept/Oct '05 Vol 1, No. 6 

Portugal 2060 Update, TS1000/2068 Pablo Pixol-o 
HIRES Graphics prgrm, TSIOOO Adventure in the RAM 
Jungle, TS1500 Monitor Adaptor, 2068 Zebra Graphics 
Tablet review, 2060 Zip Compiler review, Book review 
"Minute Manual for Dot Matrix Printers", User Group 
Update, Damco Spectrum Emulator, Spectrum "American 
Football" review 


Time Designs Nov/Dec '05 Vol 2, No. 1 

U.S. QL reduced to S299, i2SK Spectrum released, 
Sinclair TV review. User Group Update, 2060 Gazer's 
Guide to Halley's Comet, 2060 '‘Shuttle Designer" 
review, TSIOOO Adventure in RAM II, TSIOOO Interest 
prgrm, FD-68 Disk I/F review II, Zebra 2060 Disk 
Drive review, 2068 Obsticle Run prgrm, 2060 ZPRINT- 
00 review, 2068 VlEWord/MAIList/FORMal1 review. 
Spectrum D'KTronlcs Speech Synthesizer review 

Time Designs Jan/Feb '86 Vol 2, No, 2 

*'Why The QL7", TSIOOO Adventures in RAM HI, TSIOOO 
Chroma—Soft review, 2068 Shell Game prgrm. Linear 
Programming for TS user, 2068 "Turbos'* engine prgrm. 
Radio Shack Mouse & Zebra 2068 Graphics Tablet, 


2068 "lollipops" prgrm, Gamesmate fix. Joystick 
Wrap Around prgrm, 2060 Label maker prgrm, Portuguese 
Disk Drive for 2060, 2060 Machine Cods Tutor review, 
2060 OS-64 review, 2066 Rainbow Plus emulator 
review. Spectrum "Astronomer" review 


Time Designs Mar/Apr '06 Vol 2, No- 3 

Programming in QL SuperPASIC, QL "GraphiQL" review, 
*'Qf Strings and Things" TSIOOO, ZaO Machine Code I, 
2060 Tasprint It Aerco printer I/F, 2068 Phone # 
prgrm, Convert WC2050 Modem to RS-232 I/F, How to 
connect with DBS, 2060 Burglar Alarm, HI Res/64 qol 
utility 2068, 01iger 2068 Disk I/F review, 2060 
"ARTIST" review, Top—10 206B/Spectrum prgrms. Mini 
amp for Spectrum SW 



Time Designs May/June '86 Vol 2, No. 4 

Five TSIOOO tips, Printer tips, improve Zebra 
Graphics Tablet, NEWS: Amstrad Buys Sinclair, TS 
Computerfest Report, User Group Update, 640K QL 
upgrade, QL "Qspell" review, TSIOOO Consentration 
game, TSIOOO prgrm chaining I, ZSO Mchn Code H, 

2060 Cassette Directory prgrm, 2068 header reading 
w/ Hchn Code, 2060 Cavern game, Moving an AR05 
cartridge to FD-60, Adding a Spectrum/206S joystick, 
More on 01iger Disk I/F, 2060 Pro/Flle Extent!ons 
review, 2060 "Address Book" review 

Time Designs July/Aug '06 Vol 2, No. 3 

Sinclair Micro Update, Meet the DL Clones, 

Time Designs Acquires 5«U.M., QL Game reviewst 
IMatchpoint, Chess, War in the East, Wanderer, 
Squadrons ^ Hyperdrivel, QL "Cosmos" review, TSIOOO 
External Keyboard Buffer, TSIOOO Digital Clock, 
TSIOOO prgrm chaining II, Z0O Mchn Code HI, 2066 
Bankswitching "Missing 253", Embellishing 2068 MTERM 
II, 2068 Ultra-Easy Designer Graphics, 2068 "Poly- 
scrol 1 " prgrm, 206B Video file prgrm, Datagen 2060 
DATA statement prqrm, 2060 Ski game, 2068 Tasword 
Word Count addition, 2063 "Macintosh" Menu, 2060 

Sound Synthesizer review. Spectrum "Saboteur"review, 
2060 "Colonize the Universe" review 



Time Designs Sept/Oct Vol 2, No.6 

Sir Clive's Confessions, User Group Update, "Light 
Show 2000" 2060 prgrm, 2068 Pixel Sketch St Graphics 
Editor review, 2068 Timachine Compiler review, 

Larken TSIOOO Disk 1/F review, TSIOOO ZX-CALC + 
RtF.R.G. review, 2060 Bank switching: more about 
missing 253, 2060 3-D Tic-Tac-Toe prgrm, QL Peintre 
review, 0L,s U.S.A. future, QL Graphic/CAD Systems 
review, ZBO Mchn Code IV, TSIOOO Prgrm Chaining HI, 
Upgrading TS1016 RAM to 64K 


9 
































SOFTWARE IN REVIEW 


SMART TEXT TS-2068 



A warm grin began to pass over my face late last 

night. In my mind's eye I could see a little light bulb 

beginning to glow dimly in the cartoon balloon above my 
head. 

I was curled up with a good book, uh manual. After 
my second reading of this thirty page treatise and three 
sessions with the two hour electronic introduction to 
the program, the concepts by which it functioned were 

finally beginning to fall into place, I was becoming a 
cursor instead of a curser. 

"SMART TEXT TS^2068" is Bill Jones’ effort to 
create an AppleWorks environment for your TS-206e. The 
package includes a text editor and manager integrated 
with a small mailing list routine. Other convenient 
features are printer formatting for a variety of utili¬ 
tarian purposes and in a variety of type styles. 
The $39.95 price tag makes SMART TEXT one of the more 
expensive programs available for the 2068. The pro- 
gramning and memory saving tricks alone seem to justify 
the cost. In addition to some valuable techniques in 

data management 1 you can also perform some useful tasks 
with SMART TEXT- 

0£ the programming tricks mentioned, three are 
significant. The first is the routine that manages text 
entry. The character code of the keystroke is checked 
for validity. This approach is preferable to use of the 
INKEY$ function. It allows, from BASIC, a typing speed 
of 100 words per minute, according to the manual. Read 

this as you would a mileage claim on a car window 
sticker, 

SMART TEXT makes extensive use of memory saving 
techniques we learned in our TS 1000 days. Two old 
standards are eitployed by SMART TEXT to include within 
the software as many functions as possible while still 
retaining enough memory for a decent amount of text 
storage. 

One of these is the use of letter variables to 
represent often used numbers, including program line 
numbers. "Pseudo Hex" is a term coined by Bill Jones to 
refer to his assigning of the variables oo, oa, ob, ect. 
to represent the numbers 0, 1, 2, ect. Another memory 
saver is the use of logical operators in long single 
program lines to replace the need for many lines to act 
on menu choices. Bill calls the technique "Dense Pack 
BASIC". 

SMART TEXT functions are many, varied, and utili¬ 
tarian. This software appears to have been developed by 
a "user", first for himself, and now for others. There 
are so many choices not offered in other word processors 
that it will take the new user a good number of hours to 
appreciate the alternatives presented by this text 
editor and manager. 

The first and most basic function is typing. Like 
other word processors, SMART TEXT allows you to delete 
mistakes and to retype. You can also insert new text be¬ 
tween already typed words. Entire blocks of text can be 



deleted and inserted. Additional text can be appended to 
the original, and the whole text file can be saved, 
Pretty standard stuff. 

Unlike other word processors I have seen, SMART 
TEXT allows you to print what you have just typed with¬ 
out having to make a lot of decisions about how the 
printer should format the output- The text you've en¬ 
tered is quickly printed perfectly centered on the page 

in any print style but without any embedded printer 
commands. 

The secret to this "smart typewriter" mode is the 
fact that you have already spent some time explaining to 
SMART TE)^ the various commands your printer requires to 
enable and disable any special modes or pitches, 

Program lines must be revised, within the guide¬ 
lines of the Oliger protocol, to set up your printer's 
various capabilities. I altered the review copy to re¬ 
flect the pica, elite, condensed, and proportional 
pitches available on my Prowriter as well as its bold 
print and double width modes. 

SMART TEXT automatically calculates the maximum 
length of a text line in the selected pitch or mode. It 
asks you what length line you want to print. Then it 
calculates the correct margins and adjusts accordingly. 

One of the reasons my hair is grey is the time I've 
spent calculating margins for center printing different 
print pitches and widths* EtTbe<k3ed commands that are 
counted in some word processors and not counted in 
others have driven me to considerable distraction- No 
longer. 

In addition to printing text centered on the page, 
SMART TEJn* provides the capabilities of center printing 
captions and letter heads, flush left printing of 
addresses and salutations for business-like letters, and 
automatic formatting and printing of the signature block 
of a letter* 

Printing form letters to different people is accom¬ 
plished by the integration -of a small mailing list. 
Twenty-four records can be added, displayed, corrected, 
deleted, and saved. 

Mailing labels or form feed envelopes can be 
printed. The mailing list is also used to "personalize" 
form letters with the first name of the recipient. A 
comma should be appended to the first name field, since 
the software does not include it* 

In addition to letter formatting, SMART TEXT TS- 
2068 assists with the printing of manuscripts, documents 
other than letters. The document can be printed with 
justified or non-justified right margins, with the first 
line of each paragraph indented or with the entire 
paragraph in block form, and with entire paragraphs 
block indented with properly adjusted margins. 

The key to the preparation of manuscripts is the 
concept of the paragraph, SMART TEXT is set up to store 
discrete paragraphs in separate elements of two string 
arrays. It can alternately be organized to store con- 









tinuous text in three large strings. When one string is 
filled^ the text automatically moves into the next con¬ 
secutive String- 

Discrete paragraphs are stored in the HS and 1$ 
arrays. The dimension of the elements in the arrays is 
user sleeted. The maximum is about 850 characters each. 
Ideally the text stored in these paragraphs has already 
been edited and does not need to be changed. 

Continuous text is stored in the A, B, and C 
"banks". Any of these banks can be reviewed and edited 
via menu selections- The user can selectively copy a 
portion of one of these banks to another string (L$)/ 
called "The Paragraph", 

This storage area can be altered or appended fore 
and aft. These editing functions can occur even if you 
are currently entering new text into the typing buffer 
(U$), 

Prior to any editing action, any text that may be 
currently in the typing buffer is temporarily "set 
aside" into and S$ storage area. The text to be edited 
is then placed into the typing buffer for viewing or 
alteration. When the editing is completed, all the text 
is automatically restored to its former position. 

When all your text has been edited and ready for 
printing, you have a veritable plethora of printing 
sequences from which to choose. The text may have been 
stored in up to twenty different positions. User alter¬ 
able program lines determine which text is printed and 
in which order. 

Repeat printing functions take care of the number 
of copies and the page formatting- Fifty-four lines are 
printed per page, the pages are automatically numbered, 


and form feeds are sent at the appropriate times. Go 
make yourself a cup of coffee. 

My Aerco Disk version of SMART TEXT makes excellent 
use of those areas of DOS which have been implemented 
and works around those that have not- A lengthy tutorial 
is included. 

The tutorial is filled with bells and whistles that 
tended to get on my nerves after a while, A list of the 
clever graphics and sounds is provided by the tutorial 
to serve a reference for the use of these techniques in 
your own progranming, 

The tutorial and the software are both tributes to 
the fact that the BASIC syntax checker of our Timex 
Sinclair computer will not forgive misspellings and 
grammatical errors except in "Print" statements. This 
untidiness detracts from the cosmetic appearance of the 
software, although it does not affect its usefulness. 

SMART TEXT is available for cassette users in both 
32 column and OS-64 versions. AfiJ Micro Drive, Aerco 
Disk, and Oliger Disk versions are also available, 
Aerco, A&J, Tasman, and Oliger printer interfaces are 
supported. Specify version, 

SMART TEXT is $39,95 and is available from Bill 
Jones, Gulf Micro Electronics, 1317 Stratford Ave., 
Panama City, FL 32404, Bill welcomes your conments and 
questions. Call him after 6 pm local time at (904) 871- 
4513- You'll enjoy the experience, 

—Duncan Teague 


MUSICIAN 



MUSICIAN ROYAL is one of the most recent programs 
released for the 2068, Written by Dr, Oleg D, Jefimenko 
and sold by Electret Scientific Company, it proves to be 
one of the more comprehensive music programs available. 


One of the most useful features of the 


program is 

the ability to transcribe already written music into the 
computer and have it play it back to you - usinq the 
BEEP command. Even though only one voice is 
the control over the 


any 


using 

available, 

parameters makes up for it. 
The play options allow you to change the key in 
which the composition is played, the tempo can be 
changed as well as the order in which the song(s) can be 
played. The editing features allow you to change 
possible errors. 

The tape comes with three programs as well as a 
demo program with six conpositions already transcribed 
and ready to play. The first program is the actual 
transcribing program where you are greeted by a screen 
that asks you for the name of your composition and the 
number of sharps or flats contained in your selection. 
You are then greeted with a musical staff with notes and 


their respective pitch (several octaves worth) graph¬ 
ically pictured on the screen, A prompt with several 
different menu choices are also displayed. You enter the 
notes one at a time adding the inflections (sharp, flat 
or natural) as needed. The treble clef is displayed but 
you can change it up or down an octave and also the same 
can be done with the bass clef. 

Next you enter the value of the note for the time 
signature (whole, half, quarter note, ect,). At the end 
of each measure, you can enter a Q which is an aid when 
going back and editing, A duplicate function is also 
available when you have two groups of notes that are in 
the same order which really saves some typing. Entering 
Z allows you to correct your last entry. 

With a printer (TS 2D40) attached, the information 
is printed as it is entered so as to see where you are 
and to make it easy when looking for entry errors. Once 
the transcribing is completed, you have the option of 




TCH 





K M P T Z 
BCH B 





playing, SAVEing, LPRINTing, or editing. You can have it 
play as written, or in any order you wish, or contin¬ 
ually repeat itself. 

The manual is very well written and leads you 
through the program carefully- The second chapter is de¬ 
voted to those with very little background in music. It 
gives you a crash course in music notation and what all 
"all them little symbols mean". 

The second program on the tape is called MUSIC BOX 
and it allows you to take the music transcribed in 
MUSICIAN ROYAL and collect them. Each MUSIC BOX that you 
make can hold up to 8 compositions with up to 1500 notes 
(total) in the first seven and 1500 notes in the eighth 
composition. MUSIC BOX is easily filled by loading in 
data saved from MUSICIAN ROYAL. A table of contents 
helps you keep track of what is stored already* 

MUSIC ALBUM is called the "ultimate program" for 
collecting and playing coiipositions transcribed in 
MUSICIAN ROYAL, It can hold up to 2000 notes total in 8 
coirpos itions. You have the most control over the tonal¬ 
ity of each composition- You can have the slections play 
in any order, control the tempo, and control the dur¬ 
ation of the pauses between compositions. 


11 

































The programs all have certain safeguards built in, 
but are all easy to convert to mass storage such as disk: 
drives. Large printer drivers are also easily added. 

All in all, the program is very professionally done 
from the packaging to the 75 page manual which cocnes 
with it. I had no problem loading the tape and my order 
was delivered within three weeks of placing the order by 
letter. 

Needless to say, I was disappointed that it only 
used the BEEP command. I remember that I was so excited 
when I saw the ad and ordered it thinking "Great! A 
decent looking SOUND program has finally been written 
for the 2068". At least I assumed it used SOUND. Because 



Sprites, for those of you unfamiliar with them, are 
very simply User Defined Graphics {UDG*s> which are 
capable of moving about the screen. Aside from movement, 
one large difference from regular UDG's is that sprites 
are normally larger than a single character space. A 
good example of a sprite, is the ghouls and goblins that 
appear on the screen of most arcade games. 

SPRITES 2068 is a sprite development and handler 
package. Those of you that have the TDM Technical Manual 
will note that there is an appendix, number C-5, devoted 
to this subject. This program is none other than this 
same code. 

SPRITES 2068 co-authors Tidwell and Ruegg have "de¬ 
bugged" the Timex sprite package code. This was no small 
task as I had tackled this myself and found many "bugs". 
They have also enhanced the original package with the 
addition of an automatic RAMTOP setter and additional 


of this, I think the $20 price tag is a bit steep. It 
would be well worth it if it used SOUND with all of the 
features it contains. Hopefully Dr. Jefimenko will come 
out with a sequel using all four voices. 

The program is available from Electret Scientific 
Company, PO Box 4132, Star City, WV 26505 for $20. If 
you would like a sample of what you can expect, (a nice 
courtesy) they will send you the DEMO ALBUM for $3 which 
will be subtracted from the $20 if you do decide to 
order the whole program. 

—Joe Williamson 



animated sprite display 
frofii the demo program 
of SPRITES 2068. 



as the smallest unit of measure. They can be cocnbined to 
create a scroll in eight different directions. The 
scrolls, as well as the sprites should really be ad¬ 
dressed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. However, it appears 
that Timex never intended us to have that kind of con¬ 
trol from the "normal" video mode. 

SPRITES 2068 is a crude sprite package BUT it is 
the ONLY one available for the Timex Sinclair 2068, If 
you are accustomed to the graphics abilities of other 
computers, such as Conmodore or Atari machines, you 
might be a little disappointed. Keep in mind, however, 
that those computers were initially designed to play 
games and therefore, have sprite capabilities as part of 
their operating systems. 


screen attribute capabilities. 

Having the Timex sprite service code is of no use 
however, if you cannot interface a program with it. 
Therein lies the true value in this package as Tidwell 
and Ruegg have prepared a comprehensive manual and a 
very nice Basic program to demonstrate the sprite 
packages' abilities. The user manual is clear and easy 
to understand. They have assumed you know nothing on the 
subject, yet, have not "talked down" to the advanced 
programme r. 

Authors, Tidwell and Ruegg have included in the 
manual, a section on machine code interfacing. This 
section is the poorest part of the manual, but if you 
can write machine code programs, you will not suffer for 
it. They have thoughtfully listed all of the variables 
and a memory map, and of course.,,you already have your 
own copy of the Technical Manual to go by. 

And as if all of that were not enough, there is 
also a very nice UDG development tool included with the 
Basic demo program. This could be used alone to aid in 
the addition of UDG*a to your programs. It allows the 
design of each UDG in enlarged format and then displays 
the UDG in normal size, as it would appear on your 
screen. It will also display a group of QDG's, 8 across 
by 8 da^, to view your sprite {or a portion of it) as 
it will appear. 

SPRITES 2068 will allow up to 256 sprites, each one 
up to 256 by 256 characters. In practice however, you 
will find the constraints of memory size will not allow 
for this. The invisible wall, RAMTOP, will not interfere 
with your use of sprites, as there is enough memory in 
the 2068 for most all the sprites you will want to use. 

The smallest sprite possible is one character space 
(8 by 8 pixels), due to the use of the UDG's as designed 
by Timex. This means that your sprites will require some 
thought as you can only use two colors in each character 
space. Also, movement of the sprites can appear "blinky" 
if there is too much going on in your prcHjrant, 

There are vertical and horizontal screen scrolls in 
SPRITES 2068, however, they too use the character space 

12 


I found SPRITES 2068 to be an excellent "starter" 
package. If you want to include sprites in your own 
programs, you will find this utility very easy to use. I 
would suggest that you do follow the user manual's 
suggestion of prograrming in small blocks, as you must 
be very careful to maintain control over what is happen¬ 
ing on the screen. This control is needed due to SPRITES 
2068 use of the Attr-P system variables instead of 
Attr-T* With some careful planning, you will be amazed 
at the results you can accomplish. 

Tidwell and Ruegg deserve a big hand for their 
thorough treatment of sprites. They have taken the Timex 
sprite routines and explained them to us in laymans 
terms* 

Price for the SPRITES 2068 development package on 
cassette, conplete with a coirprehensive 34 page manual, 
and an educational (and entertaining) demo program, is 
$19 ppd. It is available directly from the authors (Vern 
Tidwell- 1303 Whitehead St., Key West, FL 33040 or Ron 
Ruegg- 37529 Perkins Road, Prairieville, LA 70769) and 
some Timex dealers handle it also. 

—Syd Wynccx)p 


DISK DR! VE 

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* Can be modified to work on either computer feprom and coble req) 

- The most Powerful DOS for tfie ZX-Ol ; Very User Friendly 

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- Requires double sided 5 25" drive 60 day mooey back guarantee 
prices 195 00 (USl tor single dnve 199 DO for I or2 dnves 

1100 lor dnve cable (all other cables included) 
include 1500 shipping Send certified cheque or liO 

To - LARKIN ELECTRONICS 

Ispeciiy ZX-81 or 20Gb> RR *2 NAVAN ONTARIO 

CANADA MB-IH9 























■ww 




1 or \/»rKloirt OY Xl^l » " O i el S^MrYci«i rei 
Roir YoiJt- ZXSl xxs 1 OOO ^rtel 1 &00 

3v Z'iiid< Xaivf. 


Many "Kaleidc>scope" programs have appeared over the 
years* These simple, but fascinating graphics displays 
have been adapted to virtually every computer ever 
built* The ZX81/TS family is no exception. Unfortun¬ 
ately, since the 280 CPU in these machines is (effec¬ 
tively) clocked at only ,5 mHZ in SLOW mode, the result 
is rather slow and BO-RlNG. Type in the program Listing 

11 (BASIC prototype), and you'll see what I mean* 

Now, let’s take essentially the same program and 
write it in ZSO machine code. For a graphic demonstra¬ 
tion (pun intended) of the speed and compactness of code 
,,,start by entering a 1 REM line, followed by 172 X’s 
or other character. (HINT: use FAST mode.) Now enter the 
rest of Listing 12 (machine code loader), RUN the pro¬ 
gram, and input the values given in Table #1 (decimal 
machine code)* Go from left to right, top to bottom* 

Take your time, and proof each number before you enter 
it. 

When you're done, your 1 REM line will look like 
sheer nonsense. Don't worry about that: just check it 
against the 1 REM in listing #3 to make sure it's the 
same. Enter lines 2-6 of Listing 13, overwriting the 
loader* Delete lines 7 and 8* SAVE to tape with RUN 5, 
The program will auto-run when the save is finished. 
WOWI Press BREAK when you're adequately hypnotized* 

Line 2 contains the fill characters used for the 
display. Change this however you see fit; there is no 
limit on length* HINT; use symmetrical characters, like 
0, *, =, +, the grey squares, spaces, and their in¬ 
verses . 

This will run on 2k machines if you modify the 
BASIC portion as shown in listing 14 (2k changes)* This 
is because this program relies on a fully padded-out 
display file. 

If you're interested in studying the tnachine code, 
use a disassembler or HOT 2 to take a look at the code. 
As mentioned, it pretty much follows the structure of 
the BASIC prototype, so you should have little trouble 
finding your way around, the code from 408Fh to 49B4h 
gets pseudo-random numbers in B and C, Next are two ways 
of implementing a modulo function* At 40B5, C is reduced 
mod 16 (exact power of 2), and at 40BD B is reduced mod 

12 (not a power of two)* The CALLs to 40F6, 40FB, 4100, 

4105 and 410A correspond with the BASIC QOSUBs to 250, 
300, 350, 400 and 1000, respectively. The routine at 
410A is a "print at BC" routine which is MUCH faster 
than the comparable ROM call to 08F5 followed by RST 
lOh, It prints the character pointed to by CH_ADD at row 
B, column Cp NOTE; it does NOT check for over-range. 

The next time some smart-aleck ribs you about your 
"slow" ZX/TS, boot this program and watch his jaw sag. 
Isn't this fun? 

LISTING 3; M/C KALEIDOSCOPE 

1 REM iNlMKEY$<, RETURN 
^437 -RHD]? GOSUB ?MRND"??LN 

FRST ??LN 7jK* * 7?RK* 97F6HR 

ND??eC5 TftC5 TPICS TRCS 
IF LN PLOT RNDLN IHKEY$LN 

*INKEY$flT URL LN PLOT RNDLN | INK 
EYSLN *INKE^,^iRT UAL LN CL5 RNDLN 
INKE^SLN "INKEY$flT LN CLS RNDL 
N I INKEY$LN *INKE\'$LN ??s6TflN Y C 
d|?TRN Y im/ RRND YEBTTRN y£B>" RRN 
D E£RND7UflL : RCS 3RC5 ; RC5 5RC3 
,flC5 5RC5 .»RT ?* G05UB 7-R 

ND,fiCS STTRN 

2 REM I ^ 

3 5L0U 

4 RRND U5R 16514 

5 SflUE "K5C0PE*‘ 

6 RUN 


LISTING 1: BASIC Prototype 

ICHLET Fs = "l 
20 POKE 16418,0 
30 LET POINTS© 

40 LET P0INT=P01NT+1 

50 IF POINT>LEN F$ THEN GOTO 3 

I 

60 LET fiS^FStPOINTJ 
70 LET BsINT (RNQ*12) 

80 LET C=INT tRND*16) 

90 GOSUB £50 
100 GOSUB 350 
110 GOSUB 1000 
1£0 GOSUB £50 
130 GOSUB 400 
140 GOSUB 1000 
150 GOSUB 300 
160 GOSUB 350 
170 GOSUB 1000 
180 G05UB 300 
190 GOSUB 400 
£00 GOSUB 1000 
£10 GOTO 40 
£50 LET X=16+C 
260 RETURN 
300 LET K=16-C 
310 RETURN 
350 LET Y=12+B 
360 RETURN 
400 LET Y=l£-B 
410 RETURN 

1000 PRINT RT Y,X;flS 

1010 RETURN 


LISTING 2: Machine-code Loader 

1 REM XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

2 FPST 

3 FOR fl-16514 TO 1B6S5 

4 SCROLL 

5 INPUT B 

6 POKE R|B 

7 PRINT R,PEEK R 

8 NEXT R 


TABLE 1: Machine-code Decimal Data 


17: 51 




57 

144 









0 




19: 26 






75: 50: 64 


9 : 
193 : 
144: 


3 


19;££9 




43 



203 


1 

76 

57 






193 



5 



1: 62 
126: 71 













9 

119 





251; 64 

65:193:205 
: 10: 65 

201: 62: 16 


64 
19? 

10 

65 

144 
16 
£01 
64 

£5;£03. 56 

9 





201 : 





98:105 
46: 1: 

37:111: 



4 

43 



12;184 



6 

71: 

0; 65:205: 10: 65 

205 : 




144 

14 

203 

120 



116: 

75: 

104: 









0 



103 : 

34: 


19 

125 



251 ; 


203 

3 

64 

197 

10 

0 

64 

70 




62: 12 
24: 

0 : 

25:203 
£ 9 : 6 

64: £6 


LISTING 4; 2K Changes 



3 

4 POKE 16416,0 

5 FOR Rs© TO 23 

6 PRINT RT 

7 NEXT fl 

3 POKE 16416 I 2 
9 RRND U3R 16514 

10 5RUE ’‘K5C0PE2K" 

11 RUN 


li 













n*. 

R 1 rnymm 


i 
















































































For a practical demonstration of a chained program, 
using the Above RAMTOP method of passing data from one 
module to another, I have chosen one consisting of three 
modules, A module to set RAHTOP {"RT"), a text entry 
module ("TE"), and a text LPRINT module ("PRT"), The 
program will allow you to enter, store above RAHTOP and 
print out a set of lines consisting of 32 characters per 

line. The number of lines in a set is available as 

follows: ___ 

USER RAM LINES PER SET 

2K 41 

16K 489 

32K 1001 

4BK 1513 

With a full 64k memory, the 8k area between the ROH and 
the system variables area is available and the program 
could be modified to store an additional 256 lines per 
set - 

In addition to the computer, a tape recorder, and a 
TS2040 or equivalent 32 column printer, you will need 
two tapes- Optionally, one of these can be a telephone 
answering machine message cassette tape—either 60 sec* 
(E^S #43-406) or 3 min, (RS #43-407)—price; $4,95 each* 
These are both endless loop tapes. If you plan on adding 
more modules to the program, then purchase the 3 minute 
tape* I have not found a supplier for a longer endless 
tape. 

Figure No.l is the program listing for the ^RT" 
module that sets RAMTOP to address 17096. Line 1 is set 
up to receive a four byte machine code routine to be 
POKEd by lines 141 to 144, which are then deleted. Line 
10 makes the module self running when the program is re¬ 
corded with the direct command: GOTO 10. Line 20 pre¬ 
vents a TV interupt from occur!ng during the execution 
of the program. Lines 30 and 40 POKE the desired address 
of RAMTOP into the system variable RAMTOP, Lines 50 thru 
SO POKE the four addresses under the desired address of 
RAMTOP with the decimal values that must normally be 
there (except after a GOSUB and before a RETURN) for the 
computer to operate properly. Lines 90 and 100 POKE the 
system variable ERR SP with the address in line 80 
(i.e*; the addresses of the first item on the new 
Machine Stack), Line 110 calls the machine code routine 
that is POKEd into the REM statement (Line 1) by lines 
141 to 144. Line 120 in conjunction with 140 activates 
the actual resetting of RAMTOP to the desired address. 
Line 130 automatically loads the next self running 
module if the tape is not stopped. Unfortunately, there 
is no provision in Sinclair BASIC by which you can 
directly address any of the Z80 internal registers* You 
must resort to machine code and the USR function. 
Looking on the left side of page 138 in the TS 1000 or 
page 142 in the TS 1500 User Manuals, you will find that 


the 280 assembler language mnemonic corresponding to the 
decimal value 49 in line 141 is Id sp,NN. This means 
load the machine stack pointer registers S and P with 
the address represented by the values stored in the next 
two addresses (low byte then high byte). In this case 

the values 196 and 66 POKEd into addresses 16515 and 
16516 by lines 142 and 143, Locating decimal code 201 in 
the same appendix, you will find that it stands for ret 
(return). In this case, this returns you to the next 
line of the BASIC program after the USR function, I hope 
you noticed that I did not need to use the word hexa¬ 
decimal until now- Dr- Ian Logan, the leading authority 
on the Sinclair ZX, TSlOOO/1500, and Spectrum ROM, 
states in his book, UNDERSTANDING YOUR ZX81; "The 
principal behind Hex coding is once again very simple, 
but it takes a very long time to become fluent in its 
use, and even programmers of some years experience still 
have trouble". Because of the interference with the ex¬ 
isting GOSUB and machine stacks, RAMTOP must be moved 
down a minimum of sixty addresses or up a least two 
addresses using this routine* 

Figure No,2 is the listing for the text entry 
("TE") module. The program is designed to use as little 
display as posssible, in order to be able to store more 
text. Top Down programming was not used in order to 
locate the text entry loop at the front of the program, 
adding to the entry speed of text. For the same reason, 
some memory saving techniques are not used in some 
places of lines 20 through 80. The dimension for T$ and 
the value of the variable B, are to be entered by direct 
commands prior to recording the program. The STOP in 
line 30 is typed using the shifted A key* 

Figure No*3 is the listing for the LPRINT module 
("PRT")- The prograrrming is fairly straightforward. The 
dimension for A$ and the value for the variable B are to 
be entered by direct commands before recording the 
module. 

As each of the modules will fit in Ik of RAM, in 
order to save both loading time and tape, set ElAMTOP to 
17406 before typing in each module. To do this enter: 

POKE 16388,0 

POKE 16389,68 

NEU 

I advise using a regular tape as a master, recording 
each module with the normal SAVE command before re¬ 
cording it on an operating tape using the GOTO command. 
Those who elected to use an endless tape as their op¬ 
erating must locate the place where the ends of the tape 
are spliced with a yellow strip. Never try to rewind an 
endless tape. The are designed to operate in one direc¬ 
tion only. Be sure you turn the sprocket in the correct 
direction when locating the yellow splice. After lo¬ 
cating the splice, make an audio recording, using the 
built-in mic, of one word only, such as "start" or 
"one". This will make it easy to locate the splice again 
should you need to re-record the program. The three 
modules will just fit on a one minute endless tape with¬ 
out much to spare. 

Set RAMTOP to 17408 with the commands given above. 
Type in the listing of Figure No-1, After checking the 
program against the listing, record it on the master 
tape using SAVE "RT". Now use the corrmand GOTO 141 which 
will poke the machine code into the REM statement. 
Delete lines 141 to 144, Record the second version of 
the module on the master tape using the SAVE corranand. 
Without rewinding, remove the master tape from the re¬ 
corder, replacing it with the operating tape and re¬ 
cording the module using the command GOTO 10. When the 
diagonal LOAD ccxrmand lines appear on the screen, stop 
the tape. Without rewinding, remove the operating tape, 
replacing it with the master- 

Again set RAMTOP to 17408- Type in the listing of 
Figure No,2- Check the program against the listing. 
Enter the direct commands: 


15 









T$(32) 

LET B“ (as listed belouj) 
User RAM 
2K RAM 


16K RAM 
32K RAM 
ABK RAM 

Record this module on 


B 

19409 

32745 

47129 




Replace 


65513 

e master tape using SAVE "TE"^ 
then on the operating tape using GOTO 140- When STOP THE 
TAPE appears on the screen then stop the 
the operating tape with the master tape. 

As the TE module does not change RAMTOP, you can 
clear the program using NEW. Type in the listing in Fig¬ 
ure No, 3 for the "PRT” module. After 

typing errors, enter the direct commands; 

DIM A$(i> 


checking for 


LET B=( 


listed above), 

Those using endless tape, replace REWIND TAPE in 
with spaces. Save this module on the master 


line 



using SAVE *'PRT" then on the operating tape using 
10, When STOP TAPE appears on the screen, then stop 


To operate the program, turn off the computer and 
then power up. Those not using endless tape must rewind 
the operating tape. Enter the direct cosrinand: LOAD "RT". 
Then start the tape. When the second module has loaded 
and STOP TAPE appears on the screen, stop the tape. When 
the cursor appears on the screen you can start typing in 
text. The left hand quote symbol marks the end of a 32 
character line. After checking the text, use the enter 
key. Corrections must be made before the enter key is 

, Spaces to fill out a line need not be typed* 
Any characters over 32 will be dropped. To stop text 
entry use the shifted STOP on the A key as the first 
entry of the next line. Follow the directions on the 
screen to load the LPRINT module. After the text is 
printed you have the option of printing another copy or 
reloading the text entry module to enter a new 
text, 

In the CONCLUSION of this series, I will cover 
the values for FLAMTOP and for the variable B were 
termined. 




1 

REM 1234 


10 

SAUE 

'RT" 


20 

30 

FAST 

POKE 

UAL "16383',URL 

"200 

40 

POKE 

UAL " 16389 ", UAL 

"66" 

50 

POKE 

UAL ''17095", UAL 

"62" 

60 

POKE 

UAL "17094",UAL 

"0” 

70 

POKE 

UAL '17093",UAL 

If ID 

00 

POKE 

UAL "17092”,UAL 

"113 

90 

POKE 

UAL *'16336'', UAL 

"196 

100 

POKE 

URL "16387",UAL 

"66" 

110 

RAND 

USA UAL "16514" 


120 

G05Ue 

1 UAL "140” 


130 

LOAD 

■'TE" 


140 

R ET URN 


141 

POKE 

16514,49 


142 

POKE 

16515,196 


143 

POKE 

16515,66 


144 

POKE 

16517.201 



RL 


THEN eOTO 


90" 


FIGURE NO. 


10 INPUT T% 

20 FOR Nsl TO 32 
IF T$(1J STOP 

” 90 '' 

40 POKE R.CDOE TffNl 
50 LET R=R+i 
60 IF R=5 THEN GOTO URL 
70 NEXT N 
SO GOTO 10 
90 POKE flpUPL "227'* 

100 PRINT RT SIN PI,SIN Pi;" 

RMY KEY THEN START TAPE" 

110 PAUSE UAL 
120 CL5 
130 LOAD ' 

14.0 SAUe * 

ISO PRINT AT SIN PI,SIN PI;"STO 
P TARE" 

160 PAUSE URL "120" 

170 PRINT AT SIN PI/SIN Pi; "ENT 
ER TEXT” 

180 LET P==UAL "17097" 

190 GOTO UAL "10" 

FIGURE NO. 2 


10 SAUE "PRT" 

20^PRINT AT SIN PI,SIN PIr"5TO 

30 PAUSE URL ■'120'* 

40 PRINT AT SIN PI*SIN PI;"PRI 
NT TEXT? ENTER Y/N” 

50 INPUT A* 
so CL5 

70 IF R*3”N'' then goto UAL "10 

0 ” 

00 IF R*a''Y" THEN GOTO UAL "14. 

0 " 

90 GOTO UAL "40" 

100 PRINT "REWIND TAP EXPRESS KE 
Y,START TAPE" 

110 PAUSE UAL "32768" 

120 CL5 

130 LOAD TE" 

140 FOR N=UAL '*17097" TO B 
ISO IF PEEK N^UAL "227" THEN GO 
TO UAL "180” 

160 LPRINT CHR4 PEEK N; 

170 NEXT N 
180 LPRINT 
190 GOTO UAL "40" 

FIGURE NO. 3 


Understanding And Upgrading 

TheTS1016 RAM Pack 

by Ttm Stoddard 


This is the second part on upgrading your TS 1016 
RAM Pack to 64k. Last issue we discussed the ins and 

outs of dynamic memory and how the Sinclair RAM Pack 
works. This issue it*a time to warm up the soldering 
irons1 

Take a look at Fig.l. You'll note that the circuit 
schematic looks quite similar to the one in the last 
issue* There are, however, some significant differances- 
The biggest change is the addition of selection logic 
{the 74LS13S, 74LS139}, Missing is the noisy DC to DC 
converter that generated the +12 and -5 volt bias volt¬ 
ages needed by the Older 16k DRAMS* 

Another more subtle change is the addition of the 
active low OR gate in address line 15* This brings up 
the unusual architecture used in the ZX/TS machine. The 
interupt routines in the Sinclair ROM ASSUME the display 
to be under the 32k boundryl So if y.ou add enough 
memory to extend beyond the 32k boundry and then in¬ 
itialize it, you will lose the display! TO get around 
this problem we must force the memory to "look" like 
32k during an interupt cycle. This is done by oring 415, 
the address bit that determines which 32k boundry were 
in, and Ml which occurs during an interupt cycle. Un¬ 
fortunately the Ml cycle also occurs during EVERY in¬ 
struction fetch. The effect of this is that you CAN not 
EXEXOTE PROGRAMS ABOVE 32K* However# you CAN store data, 
such as a large array above the 32k boundry which is 
what most people want the extra memory for anyway., .So# 
warm up the old soldering iron an let's go,,, 

The conversion is done in two steps and should take 
someone with "good” experience a weekend to conplete, I 


should point out at this time that neither myself not 
Time Designs Magazine is responsible for any damages 
caused to your RAM Pack or your computer by this modi¬ 
fication. THIS IS NOT A GOOD FIRST OR EVOJ A TENTH 
PROJECT, You Ml need experience in PCB repair and 
handling a low power soldering iron* I will assist any¬ 
one having trouble by either BBS canmunication (Compu¬ 
Serve ID 73127,2664: Zebra BBS ID "Tim"), or S.A.S.E* 
mail from you (85-48 66th Road, Rego Park, NY 11374)* I 
would recqmnend, if your not too confident# that you 
purchase a 16k RAM Pack from zebra Systems or other 
source, to modify. They are inexpensive (under $10) and 
will allow you to use your ZX/TS while taking a break 


from the modifications, 

A WORD ABOUT STATIC ELECTRICITY: Very siitply, it 
can destroy all the work you put into a project in just 


a few nano-aeconds* Work on an anti-static mat. This can 
be a commercial item or a piece of aluminum foil* The 
idea is to keep you, the project# and anything that 
touches the project at the SAME POTEWriAL* Use an un¬ 
grounded tip type soldering iron. 


YouMl need the following PARTS: 


(8) 4164 or equivalent 64K DRAIte 

(1) 74HCT13a or 74LS130 
Cl> 74HCT13g or 74LS139 
U) 74HCT00 or 74LS00 
16 pin 1C sockets 
Cl) IK 1/4 watt resistor 
<11) 114146 or 1V914 diodes 













YduHI need the following TOOLS: 





5) 

0) 


71 

SI 



2> 

3> 




23 watt soldering Iron 
solder sucker/wick 

small wire cutters CYcellte 73CG is Ideal! 
small needle nose pliers CXcellte 79CG Is Ideal) 

30 gauge wlre^wrap wire 
20*24 gauge solid wire 

Brenel aoto-tool with extra^small ball cutter or an Xacto 
knife 

Cra£j glue 

solder 

Antl-statlc mat 


FIVE VOLT DRAM CORVERSIOI 


Dlssasenble the case on your antl^etatlc mat. From this point on BE 

CAREFULL with the ribbon cable connecting the two PCBs, It le very 

easy to break a wire In It and not even know It 'till you have 
powered up. 

Remove all componaats from the DRAM PCB not marked In Illustration 
•^A'*. Start with the small componants first by using the solder 
sucker/wlck to remove the solder from the pad and then using the 
needle^nose pliers to work the wire loose. TAKE YOUR TIKE! When you 
get to the DRAM ICs use this msthod; take the small wire cutters 
cut all the leads on one side of the IC close to the PCB, then bend 
the IC up then back A forth to break off the leads on the other 
side of the IC. Raw use your solder sucker/wlck to remove the 
solder and old 1C lead from each of the pads. TORE VERY CAREFULLY 
HERE. DOI'T LIFT AITY OF THE FOIL PATTERlfS. Take a break after each 

DRAM removed,.... younI be rewarded with good clean job, and a ram 
pack that worksf 

Check the DRAM PCB for solder splashesT sbortSt etc. At this point 

you should only have 6 de-coupllng caps and 1 electrolytic cap left 
on the board. 

Install tha eight IC pin sockets In the DRAM looatlone placing pin 
1 toward the electrolytic cap. 

Install Jumper ^’A"' where a cap used to be as shown In Illustration 

"A*^. This Jumpers one of the multiplexed address lines to ground to 

make the ram pack a IbK version. This Jumper will be removed later, 
after testing. 

Make the 3 cuts, and 3 adds as shown In Illustration "B**, 

Carefully Install the PCBs onto the coi^uter (leaving them out of 
the case), and power up. If nil is well you should get the usual 
"K*' cursor In Just a few seconds. Check to see If tha ram was 
properly Inltall^ed by executing the following comnandJ PRIIT PEEK 
16386 + 256 * PEEK 16389. You should get 32768. If not re*check the 
above steps and find where you want wrongY 

This completes the 5 volt conversion step. 


SIXTY FOUR K CDIVERSIOI 


Your ran pack should be fully operational as a 16K pack using the 5 
volt only 64K DRAMS at this point, DO lOT COITIIUS OH UITIL THIS IS 
TRUE. 






IP » 

Tft ft rt 

pfti a 


tnm \ 


Cwi4«) V 



(vsm) 








m 

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t* 

AtV-^ 



ULL IMHPO 


a: 

»i 0) la 
HI 1A 




1 

fr 

4 

1 


ai 


tt 










mV 

ita 


PS 


St 


f4U(rr 

i4P> 







ftfH Aw/ 


(ri) rir> 
C*M) Trr 



TH 




Figure 1: Modified Sinclair RAM Pack Schematic 



Illustration A; Component Side 




Illustration B; Back Side 


Perform the cuts and adds as shown In Illuetratlons *'C'* 8 

Take the three ICs (74LB138,139,OU) and bend all leads horizontal 
■ the body except the power leads (pins 8,16 for the 74LS13B,139 
and 7,14 for the 74LS00). See Illustration '"E" . 

Using Crazy glue, and working VERY FAST glue the 74LSl3d, lining up 
the power leads on top of IC "A'* the 74LS157 on the COITROL PCB 
(the PCB with the connector on It). See Illustration for IC 
Identification. Next glue the 741.S139 lining up the power leads 
again to the 74LS13a Just glued on. Finally glue the 74LS00, lining 
up lt*s pin 14 to the 74L3l39's pin 16. 


Carefully bend back pin 
it touches pin 8 of the 
power lends are lined- 
ill ustrat Ion 



7 on the 74LS00 (top of IC stack) so that 
74LSI39 under It. After insuring all the 
and touching, solder them. Check with 



CcWTteL P^B 



^ tw Ml 

fW 11 -me ^ pw 

^ ^hML 9 mL bm v 
ft TiUPO |C 

3 - 


6) Using Illustration “P* and 30 gauge wire-wrap wire: 


Illustration C; Cuts 


Illustration D; Adds 





















































































































































































ADD VIEE FROM HERE 

TO HERE 


74LS00, PII 3 

74LS138, 

Fin 3 

74LS138, PII 14 

74LS139, 

PtI 15 

OEQ on connector 

74LS138, 

PII 4 

74LS13d. FII 8 

74LS136, 

PtI 5 

74LS136, PII 16 

74LS138, 

PIM 6 

A14 on ccnnectDr 

74LS136, 

PII 2 

A13 on connector 

74LSI38, 

Pll 1 

MI an connector 

74LSOO, 

PII 5 

A15 on connector 

74LSD0, 

FIM 4 

74LS00, PII 6 

74LSD0, 

FIIS li2 

A12 on connector 

74LS139, 

PII 13 

All on connector 

74LS139, 

PII 14 


7) Add a prepared diode with the anode ealdered to pin 15 of tlie 
74LSI36, Then add a 30 gauge i^ire from EOlCS on the connector to 
the cathode of this diode. 

6} Add five prepared diodes with the cathodes soldered to pine 

9,10*11,12,6 13 of the 74LS136. Then add a lOI-FREPARED diode with 
the cathode soldered to pin 7 of the 74LS13&. Bring the diode 
around the 1C "stach” and line up It’s anode with the other 5 

diodes, solder all six anodes foralng a "buss’’. See Illustration 
»F^ 

lext solder a IK resistor froa pin 16 of the 74LS136 C+5 volts) to 
the ’’anode buss”. 


10) Add diodes In the following table for each of the 2K blcjcks of 8K 

■’hidden” area that ^ou want to use. 


EAH AREA RAIGE 
61Q2 to 1023Q 
10240 to 12207 
12268 to 14335 
14356 to 16303 


CATHODE TO Pit OF 74LSI39 

12 

11 

10 

9 


Tie the anodes of any of the diodes used above to the 
'’anode buss”. 


Add wire from the ’’anode buss” to pins 9 6 10 of the 
74LS00. Then add a wire from pin 8 of the 74LSC0 to the pad 
shown in Illustration ”G” <thls pad runs to pin 5 of the 
74LSO0 IC ”F' on the COrTEOL PCB, 




(vwT- cifr ^ 






fAnnfirtftnnl 



CO*^€<^Ti>K 


^ fcB 


Illustration E: IC Stack 



Illustration F: Stack o£ ICs £ Signal Locations 


Eeaove jusper "A” In Illustration "A". 

11> Plug the ran pack onto the conputer and power up* If all is well 
you should get your *'K” cursor. Execute: PRIII PEEK 16366 t 356 t 
PEEK 16360. This should give you 32766. If thle works enter the 
following connand lines one at a tine: Cl) POKE 16366,255 C2l POKE 
16389,255 C3> NEW C4) PRUT PEEK 16386 +256 » PEEK 16369* Ton 
should now get 65535t indicating that the entire raa Is now 
Inltalilted and ready for use. 


12) re-assesble the PCBs back Into the case and re^test as above, This 
completes the conversion. 


OPTIONS; You can use the internal RAM socket via 
the RAM Pack selection logic- This is where I placed m/ 
ZX-LR8 ROM for high speed cassette access- The cuts for 
this option are shown in illustration “C“, and the adds 
are shown in Illustration "D". Those cuts and adds just 
isolate the RAMCS pin on the connect!or from the +5 volt 
buss it was normally connected to (the RAM Pack normally 
disables the internal 2k RAM)* Illustration "F" then 
shows ^ere to connect the wire to use the RAMCS pin to 
enable the internal RAM socket. Note that you could use 
any of the 2k selection blocks from the 74LS139 chip* 
See the schematic (Fig.!)* 

Another great option is the ability to change the 
configuration of the RAM Pack via a DIP switch. On one 
of my prototypes, I installed a DIP switch to allow en¬ 
abling or disabling any of the four 2k blocks in the Hk 
"hidden” area* The best physical location is shown in 
Illustration "F”* The way I electrically connected it is 
shown in the schematic of Pig*2. You could also use the 
switch arrangement to enable or disable any ot the 8k 
system blocks too. In fact, Pig*2 shows a combination of 
switching both the 2k "hidden* blocks and the 8k system 
blocks* After you glue the switch in place, you can cut 
a small access hole in the side of the case with the X- 
acto knife so you can change the configuration without 
taking apart the case* 

That's about it* Write and let me know how you made 
out* I*ve also designed from the ground up an expansion 
RAM that uses the new 256k RAMS (64k by 4 bit). The en¬ 
tire circuit uses just 9 chips and takes advantage of 
the newer DRAM'a internal refresh logic* If there is 
enough interest, 1*11 submit the article to TDM. 


J 


CevTWL 











7+0 

m 



— rc iiAcn rt a 

IP OP smejk 




fggb-ytmtviM - r— P 





Illustration G: Pad/Peed-Through Locations 



- f JGSci 


>1" rt 


fWi 


to iAwci 



Figure 2; Optional Pack Configuration Switch 


16 






























































































I left the last lesson vith a challenge to you to 
the sannple disassembly from Lesson 2 to eliminate the overflow 
error it contained. If you had difficulty^ refer to Lesson 4* 
The answer was given in the conparison which explained the ADC 
instruction. How many of you thought of rewriting the routine 
using the sixteen bit intructions? Did you use LD HL^tpq) and LD 
BCi (pqj? Can you see how a short Basic interface (program) 
could collect the values and call the MC routine to perform the 
addition? I trust some of you are beginning to have some ideas. 

We know how to load a register (pair) of memory location 
and perform arithmetic with the values loaded. We would/ how¬ 
ever/ find HC of very limited value if these were all it could 
do. Most of you are familiar with the Basic commands GOTO and 
003UE. In truth/ it is these instructions that give a program 
the power to do some real work for us. 

In PIC, the equivalent instructions are referred to as Jumps 
and Calls. The syntax for these instructions are given in Chart 
5. ¥ou will note a new abbreviation/ C/ which is a test for the 
condition (or status) of a flag. 

We briefly discussed the Carry flag last lesson. Here is 
how the F (flag) register is arranged: 


Flag 


7 

5 


& 

Z 


4 

H 


Z 2 1 

. P/V N 


0 

C 


S -= 
1 ^ 

H - 
P/V- 
N = 
C - 


Si gn 
Zero 

H^lf-Carry 

Parity/DverfIow 

Subtract 

Carry 

Not ui^ed 



Each flag indicates a specific condition based on the 
result of the last instruction executed. Chart 6 indicates how 
the flags are affected by the various instructions. It is 
important to know how the flags are affected as every in¬ 
struction does not affect them and many instructions do not 
affect them as you might expect. 

Enough of that, back to the Jun^ instructions. This in¬ 
struction has two versions/ Jump and Junp Relative. The mne¬ 
monics are JP and JR/ respectively. 

JP is equivalent to Basic's GOTO. JP begins executing the 
next instruction at the absolute address you specify as its 
argument. A JP 4CX)0h instruction will send the CPU off to 
address 4CXX)h to find the next instruction to execute. Your 
umps can be conditional...that is, they can test one of the 
flags and junp only if the condition is met. 

JR requires the introduction of another Hex to Decimal con¬ 
version chart/ Chart 7. You will note that the first half of 
this chart is the same as our previous Hex to Dec chart (Lesson 
1). The last half, however, indicates negative numbers. When 
numbers ace used in this fashion, they are referred to "signed 
numbers". Signed numbers merely means that the most significant 
bit (bit 7) is used to represent the sign of the number. A set 
bit (1) is a negative number and a reset bit (0) is positive. 

JR also requires a brief discussion of the register pair 
PC. PC is a special register pair not normally accessible to us. 
It is called the Program Counter and its job is to keep track of 
where the next instruction to execute is located. All Z80 in¬ 
structions are 1,2,3 or 4 bytes in length. The CPU will always 
advance PC by the correct number of bytes for the instruction it 
is about to execute. The effect of this is to skip any arguments 
belonging to the current instruction so as to be in position to 
fetch the next instruction. 

Any jump instruction causes PC to discard the address it 
contains and replace it with the new address, as specified in 
the jump instruction. Mote, PC will always contain the address 
of the next instruction to execute, not the current one. 


Sign Flag - Stores the sign of the last result. Flag will 

be set for a negative result and reset for a 
positive result (always reflects the most 
signifigant bit of the result). 

Zero Flag — Checks whether last result was zero. Flag will 

be set if result is zero, else reset. 

Note; flag “ 1 if result = 0. Natch it! 
Half-Carry- Used internally by CPU to record carry from 

bit 3 to bit 4 in registers or bit 11 to bit 
12 in register pairs. He will ignore it. 

Par tty/Overflow- Has two jobs depending on the instruction 

Last executed. 

Parity is the number of set bits in the result 
and is referred to as odd or even. Flag will 
be set if parity is even and reset if odd. 
Note; even parity generates an odd flag. Watch 
this one, also! 

Overflow records a carry from bit is into bit 7 
which effectively changes the sign of result 
in signed arithmetic operations. Flag will be 
set for overflow, else reset. 

Subtract Flag- Used internally by CF'U to record whether 

last instruction was addition or subtraction. 
Flag will be set if was subtraction operation. 
We will Ignore this one, also. 

Carry Flag- Our old friend records a carry from bit 7 to 

bit 8 in registers or bit 15 to bit lb in 
register pairs. Is also used to save the lost 
bit in the shift and rotate instructions. 

You will note that two bits of the flag register are un¬ 
used. The status of these bits are important and there are no 
instructions that affect them. 

Each flag can be in one of two states...set or reset (on or 
off). A set bit * 1 (on) and a reset bit « 0 (off). This can 
become very confusing when using the Zero or Parity/Overflow 
flags, as the flag will not be as we expect it. For instance, 
the Zero flag ^ 0 if the result was not zero. Most of the time, 
however, you can use the flags without knowing whether they are 
set or not. You need only test their status and juirp accord¬ 
ingly. 


The JR instruction adjusts the PC by adding the value 
specified to the current value of PC. In other words, JR tells 
the CPU to Junp to address X, which is Y bytes from where PC is. 
Y can only be in the range of -128 to 127 and X is the calcu¬ 
lated new address. In the case of negative values, the program 
would jump back to a previous instruction (loops) while positive 
numbers would cause the skipping over of the next Y bytes. 

JR can also be conditional as indicated in Chart 5 and 
discussed above for JP. 


line 


type 
held 
an 

that 


cccnnon to have a 


this 


When programtiing in Basic, it is quite 
such as: 

100 GOTO 10*VAL AS+1000 
There is a MC instruction, JP (HL), which emulates 
of operation. This instruction will jump to the 
in the HL register pair. This allows a routine to build up 

from tables or inputs and transfer program control to 
. We will not discuss this much further now as it 




represents some pretty advanced programning. 

CALL is our GOSL'B equivalent. It acts exactly like BASIC’s 
OOSUB. A jump is made to the specified address and a return is 
made to the instruction that would have been executed next had 
the CALL not been encountered. This is acconplished by saving 
the address in PC on the stack (we will explain the stack later) 
before making the junp. 

There is a special case of CALL# that does not require an 
address to be specified, which is know as RST. RST is read re¬ 
start / and is unique because it is the only instruction that 
uses an eight bit address. RST calls a subroutine with a one 
byte instruction. 

Some important points about RST are that it is uncon¬ 
ditional and usually computer specific (can not run on another 
Z80 based computer). Being conputer specific is due# unfor¬ 
tunately, to there already being instructions at all the RST 

addressed, which cannot be changed. This is due to our operating 

system being in a ROM type memory. All is not lost though. Since 
these are very handy instructions, Sinclair put some of the most 
accessed routines there. We will find that we can use some of 
the RST instructions, after all. 

As with any GOSUB instruction, Calls and RSTS require a 

return instruction to let the CPU know the routine has finished 
its task. The mnemonic for return is amazingly enough RET. RET 
will perform exactly the operation you would expect it to, and 


19 
























your returns can be conditional- Conditional returns allow for 
many exit points based on completing certain tasks« There are 
two special RETs which we will discuss later because they are 
used to return from the interrupts* 

We have learned about the flags and how to make jumps and 
calls based on their status- We now need to explore some of the 
ways to set these flags in order for our tests to be mean¬ 
ingful- One of the ways to do this is directly with the CCF and 
SGF instructions. 

CCF means Complement the Carry Flag- If Carry was set^ it 
will be reset and vice versa* SCF means Set the Carry Flag. The 
Carry flag will set by this instruction. 

Another way to affect the flags is with the remainder of 
the arithmetic instructions {I*ve been holding out on you 
again)* These are also listed on Chart 5, and can not truely be 
refferred to as arithmetic instructions# except for CP. 

CP# which means compare, is a neat and often used in¬ 
struction. CP sets all the flags as if a value were subtracted 
from the Accumulator# but without changing the value of the 
Accumulator I It is important to realize the result of the 
Compare is not stored anywhere# only the flags are affected* 
CP has two special forms# CPI and CPD, which are read Cofnpare 
with Increment, and Compare with Decrement* CPI performs the 
same as a CP (ML) instruction would, except that HL is in¬ 
cremented and BC is decremented. The only flag affected is the 
P/V flag which is set according to the value of BV. If BC - 0, 
then P/V ^ 0. 

CPD is the same as CPI except that HL is decreimented. The 
effect on the flags is the same* 

The next instruction is DJN2-..which is not GreekI DJNZ is 
read "decrement the B register and jump relative if B is not 
zero"* This is an extreinely useful instruction which leads to 
the B register being used as a counter. DJME can be compared to 
the Basic loop control variable- The equivalent Basic statement 
would be as follows: 10 For X = 10 to 0 Step -1 

20 (do job here} 

30 Nex t X 

In order to perform the same operation as DJNZ using any 
other register, you would need two instructions; 

D£C L 

JR NZ, Loop 

To use DJNZ, you must properly load the B register* You 
can then construct a loop to do whatever task you wish* You can 
even reuse the B register in the loop, if you properly preserve 
its value first- More on this preservation of values later* 

CPL stands for Complement* Each bit of the Accumulator is 
altered (corrplemented). For example: if the Accumulator contains 
11011101b, its complemented form would be 00100010b. 

NEG is the last unexplained instruction on chart 5* MEG 
will negate the Accumulator# which means to place the two’s 
complement of the A register in the Accumulator* if the Accumu¬ 
lator contains 5# it will be negated to «S- 

You now have about one third of the Z80 instruction set, 
and with the stack instructions next issue (they are certainly 
the [Dost used of the instructions)* You are now armed with the 
tools to write a MC program of your own design, I encourage you 
to experiment and see if you get the desired results- I will 
reply personally to all enquiries that contain a S.A.S.E., if 
you have difficulty (send 2107 S.E* 155th St*, Portland, OR 

97233)* 

With the next lesson, we will explore printing to the 
screen as that will give us some immediate feedback as to how we 
are doing and whether our routine is working. If you have any 
information on the display file and/or ROM routines# you should 
review it, in anxious anticipation. 


CHART 5 


Jv-Wjca _ 

JP nn 
JP c,n.n 
JP 

jn m 
JR c *■ 
DJM£ e 

CALL nn 
CALL c * run 
RST Hit 

PET 
RET c 


Flag 

CCF 

SCF 


CP n 
CP r 
CP 1HL> 
CPI 
CPD 

CPU 

NES 


Wh*r*j n - ifiy nunarlc eeinmt*nt 0 to 7SS 

nn • arty rutii«rlc conmtant H to 4iS53S 

r ■ any min9l* r*glater 
■ ^ any nuffloric conatant -12B to 12? 

e • mtatua 

nn “ O0h, OSh, IBh, 10h* 20h, 2eh, 30h, or 3Qh 


CHART 6 



1 

r 

1 

2 

1 P/V 

1 

» 


1 

• 

H 

f H 

b 

. 

Camm*nts 

ADPf AOC 

1 

1 


1 

B 


4 

r 

V 

1 

p 

« 

1 

B 

Q 

i « 

1 

■ 

Q add or Add 


1 

1 


1 

B 


4 

p 


i 


1 

B 


1 

B 

I 

■ 

w/curry 

ADO 

1 

m 


1 

J 

- 

! 


1 

« 


1 

1 

e 

1 

1 

1 

16 bit #dd 

ADC 

1 

■ 

* 

1 

1 

* 

1 

1 

V 

1 

B 

♦ 

1 

1 

e 

1 

1 

B 

16 bit *dd w/eirry 

AMD 

1 


1 

1 

« 

1 

• 

p 

* 

« 

1 

9* 

0 

! 1 

1 

P 

Ln^icat oparattonm 

BIT 

1 

4 

— 

1 

I 

fl 

1 

1 

— 

4 

1. 

— 

4 

h 

0 

! 1 

4 

■ 

spec 14ied b11 cpplBd 


1 


1 

P 


1 

P 


1 

B 


1 

4 


1 

B 

1 

intq tmrij 

RFS* L SET 

♦ 

- 

1 


h 


1 

* 

1 

4 



1 

Bit indtr-udllartA 

CCF 

1 

■ 

* 

1 

4 

- 

1 

B 

- 

1 

4 

- 

1 

1 

e 

1. 

1 

1 

CompI«n*nt c«rry flag 

SCF 

1 

■ 

» 

1 

4 

- 

1 

1 

- 

1 

*1 

- 

1 

1 

a 

f 0 

a 

r 

Set carry flag 

CP, sue, 

1 

a 


1 

B 

« 

1 

r 

V 

e 

B 


1 

B 

I 

! ^ 

1 

fl 

3 bit HubtrA^t or mub^ 

SBC, DEC, It 

1 


4 

B 


4 

B 


1 

B 


I 

B 


p 

fl 

P 

■ 

tract «/carry, conparv 

IMC 

1 

w 


1 

B 


1 

B 


1 

4 


1 

t 


1 

1 

1 

1 

nr mccumul ^.tor 


1 

■ 


1 

B 


1 

B 


i 

4 


1 

4 


* 

1 

•# 

L B bit dRCrement 

Dec, 4 tNC 

1 

- 

i 

- 

1 

4 


1 


4 

P 


m 

♦ 

16 bit d«CLr«nifent and 


I 

<4 


1 

4 


1 

4 


4 


1 


1 

4 

1. 

lncram«nt 

SBC 

1 

h 


1 

fi 

# 

1 

B 

V 

1 

4 


1 

•*- 

1 

I* 

1 

4 

16 bit subtract u/carry 

CPI* CPIR, 

1 

- 

1 

H# 

1 

fl 

p 

1 

4 

- 

1 

4 

1 

4 

P 

Block ssarchrsi If 

CPD, it CPDR 

1 

4 


1 

J 


1 

1 


1 

B 


4 

p 


4 

k 

1 

J 

A-IHLl, sis* I^0jP/V»l 


1 

4 


1 

1 


i 


I 

B 


4 

1 


4 

1 

1 

•9 

if BC not vquAl to 0, 


« 

r 


1 

m 


1 


1 

B 


1 

n 


1 

4 

p 

•ISB P/Va0 

CPL 

1 

9 

- 

1 

■ 


1 

— 

1 

B 


1 

4 

t 

■ 1 

4 

p 

CtHiiplani«nit accumulator 

DAA 

4 


4 

.1. 

* 

* 

1 

p 

» 

A 


1 

i 

- 

t * 

1 

4 

Decimal adjust accum. 

IN 

i 

n 

- 

4 

t 

- 

4 

1 

- 

1 

|. 

- 

1 

1 

- 

1 

1 

1 

Input raglster dirset 

IH 

« 

■ 

- 

1 

B 


4 

B 

p 

1 

B 

a 

4 

p 

0 

! 0 

4 

1. 

Input register indirect 

INI, IND, 

1 

- 

1 

m 


f 

P 

- 

1 

- 

4 

k 

1 

h 

f 

h 

Block in k out instruc- 

QUTI, QUID, 

i 

■ 


1 

B 


1 

B 


1 

B 


1 

B 


1 

fl 

1 

■ 

tionsi if B is not 

INIR, INDR 

I 

4 


1 

4 


1 

B 


1 

B 


1 

B 


1 

■ 

1 

4 

equal to 0, else Z«1 

OTIR, k OTDP 

I 

t 


1 


1 


i 

•1 


1 


4 

t 

1 

r 


LD 

1 

4 

- 

1 

- 

1 

- 

1 

4 

- 

1 

4 

- 

1. 

4 

k 

Assignment instructions 

LOI* LDD* 

! 

* 

1 

B 


« 

h 

p 

i 

•> 


1 

k 

o 

! O 

1 

Block transfers^ P/V-1 

LOIR* a LDDR 

1 

B 


1 

M 


4 

B 


4 

r 


4 

m 


1 

m 

1 

■ 

if BC is not equal to 0 


1 

4 


1 


1 

4 


1 

4 


1 

4 


I 

1 

* 

k 

else P/V-0 

□R* ti XOR 

1 

B 

e 

» 

* 

1 

B 

p 

1 

4 


1 

e 

♦ 0 

4 

B 

Logical DR accumuilator 

RLA* RLCA, 

1 

1 


f 

B 

- 

1 

1 

- 

1 

1 

- 

1 

B 

0 

! 0 

1 

1 

Rotate accumulator 

RRA* k RRCA 

1 

1: 


1 

B 


B 

B 


1 

P 


1 

B 


i 

1 

1 

B 


RL, RLC, RR, 

1 

B 

» 

1 

4 

* 

1 

B 

p 

1 

1 

# 

1 

h 

0 

: 0 

P 

B 

Rotate and shift left 

RRC, SLA, SRA 

i! 


1 

• 


1 

4 


1 

• 


1 


1 

1 

or right 

SRL 



b 

F 


1 


i 


1 

1 


t 

i 

K 

B 


■i 


Chang* 


Accord lri9 

to r#«ult 


- • Flag either unchanged or undotarttiinabl• 

e ^ Fiaq rraot 

i ^ Flag oe-t 

P - Parity cbangad according to r««olt 

V - OvarfloH chanqad according to reault 


CHART 7 

Signed Numbers—Hex/Dec Conversions 



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Zebra Syatcma juit made & ipceial purchase of all the 
Timcx/Sinclair product left in Softsync^i warehouse in order to 
brins you these fme programs at special low prices, Softsync 
started in the Timex market with excellent products, but they now 
focus on IBM, Commodore and other large markets, where they 
sell products like the Personal Accountant for much more money. 
All product is new and packaged with documentation in 
Softsync*B attractive four-color boxes. Quantities are limited, so 
act now. These products list at tl9.9S to $34.95 and are in our 
regular catalog for 117.95 to $32.95. But now our liquidation sale 
prices are at follows: 



Personal Accountant #SS04 


INVENTORY SALE PRICES: 


1 

for 

$10 

1st 

$10 

2 

for 

$19 

2nd 

$9 

3 

for 

$27 

3rd 

$8 

4 

for 

$34 

4 th 

$7 

5 

for 

$40 

5th 

$6 

6 

for 

$45 

6th 

$5 


Zeus Assembler Cat# SS05 

Machine Code programming is made simple with Zeus. This 
sophisticated programmers' aid allows the use of the full Z* BO 
mneumonic instruction set and comes with a step by step 
instruction booklet. 

Unique features include: a full screen editor, automatic line 
numbering and renumbering and mini monitor. Displays current 
registers and single stroke commands save machine code. 

Zeus Monitor and 

Dissassembler Cat# SS06 

Acclaimed by reviewers as the most comprehensive Monitor and 
Dissassembler available. 

This powerful programming tool allows you to translate 
machine code into comprehensible assembly language instructions, 
enabling you to examine the BASIC ROM, to investigate the 
workings of the Timcx/Sinclair 39B8 or to analyse your own 
machine code routines. 

With the highly versatile Monitor, you get an extensive set of 
facilities to aid the entry, inipectlon, modification and debugging 
of your own machine code programs. 


The Personal Accountant is a powerful yet purposefully simple 
accounting program for household and small business use. Using 
a time honored accounting practice known as "Double Posting 
Book-keeping" the Personal Accountant will instantly organise all 
your financial information. 

Open as many accounts as you need, balance your checkbook 
instantly, track loans, charge card purchases, expenses and IRA's. 
Generate financial reports ranging from trial balances to 
profit/loss, expense vs. income and assetts over liabilities. An 
amortisation table can calculate payments and changing rates, 
generate future value and growth tables. And a built in data base 
keeps names, addresses and other vital data at your fingertips. 

The Personal Accountant is comprehensive ycl simple to use 
with no codes to memoriie and the screen will guide you every 
step of the way. 

VOICE CHESS Cat# SSOl 

The Most advanced chess game available for the Timcx/Sinclair 
3068 actually talks to you during the game. A digitised voice 
•peaks through the computer's speaker, advising of its move, 
recommending moves for you and making facetious comments. 

Voice Chess is written in fast machine code so it responds to 
your moves quickly. 

Features include: analyse mode, recommend move, change colors 
or levels at any point in the game, save, reload and print out any 
game you pUy. Displays full Chess board in detail. 


GULPMAN 


Cat# SS03 


The cursed wormoidi are out to get control of Gulpland, 
chasing its inhabitants out of their apple orchards. Eat as many 
apples as you can to get bonus points and use your lasers to stun 
the wormoids. 15 different mases. 


CYBERZONE Cat# SS02 

Special Feature: Use your voice to activate your laser firel The 
sound of your voice sends lasers shooting at the enemy. 

Imagine yourself pitted against the Cyber's ultra accurate laser 
fire. The situation is tense as you avoid the swooping, spinning 
fighters coming to get you. 

Can you stay alive long enough to chip away at the floor of 
Cyber's spinning spacecraft? And is your aim deadly enough to 
hit the Cyber's only vulnerable spot...his left foot? 

Cyberionc Is a fast game with five levels of play and exciting 
graphics that place you in the center of the action. 


Ordering Instructions: include is.oo s&H. viSA/MC 

Accepted. 


Zebra Systems, Inc. 

78-06 Jamaica Avenue 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 

(718) 296-2385 













Dear Time Designs Reader, 


are very pleased 


Catalog 


bring you our Zebra 
centerfold 


November/December Time Designs Magazine, For 

catalogs were printed 


economic reasons 


previously 


one large batch and have become 


slighted dated. 


For that reason we are 


supplementing it with several pages of new product 
announcements, sales, and a short list of updates. 


Particularly exciting are 


new bargain 


prices we are able to offer on Softsync's very high 
quality software products, and on our TS2068 
compatible Trackball controllers. We will continue 
to strive to bring you the best support products for 
Timex computers 


and 


best 


prices. 


Please accept our best wishes for the Holiday 
season and for a happy and healthy New Year, 

Sincerely yours, 

Jane, Linda, Jeff, Tom, and Stewart 
The Staff of Zebra Systems 


Zebra 



Sellers 



For those who are ioterested^ here Is a 



short 
products 
Desigos ads 


our currently best selling 


check 



in our Time 



I 


on the various pages in 


our 1986B Catalog. 



TS2068 Trackballs (TD) 

Sprites 2068 (TD) 

Greeting Card/Baoner/Sign Designers (P3) 

TS2068 Technical Manual (PI) 

Tech Draw Jr,(P2) 

OS64 Cartridge (P7) 

Mscript (P4) 



64K TSIOOO RAM PACKS (P13) 
Machine Code Test Tool (P15) 
Discounted Books (PlO-11) 
TS2050 Modem Boards (P12) 




TS2068 

Trackball 

Only $19.95 





Originally sold for $69.95 
Specify Cal# TBTMX02 

Plugs into TS2068 Joystick Port and 

works with all joystick software. 

Bonus Feature: Also works on Commodore 64, 


VIC*20, ATARI 800, and more. Contact factory 
for more complete list. 


You c&n benefit from our recent purchase of brand new WICO 
Trackball Controllers at closeout prices. WeVe taken the model 
WICO oripnally made for the Texas Instrument 99/4A and made a 
very simple modification so it now is fully compatible with the 
Timex TS2D6S's joystick port. 

WICO is the largest designer and manufacturer of control devices 
for commercial arcade video games. If you've ever played an arcade 
video game, chances are youVe used a WICO joystick or trackball. 
You’ve experienced the superior control. The pinpoint firing 
accuracy. The exceptional durability. 

Features: Phoenolic ball offers S60-degree movement. Two optical 
encoders provide split-second movement. Quick-action fire button 
for smooth, two handed arcade response and feel. Long S* computer 
connection. Heavy duty plastic case for tong hard use. 

The WICO warranty has been voided by our modification. But we 
give you our iS-day money back guarantee and a one-year limited 
warranty from Zebra Systems. 


Timex Games $2 Each 

With your order for a T52068 trackball you can purchase any of the 
following Timex TS2068 Trackball and Joystick compatible garnet at 
the special tow price of t2.00 each for cassettes and $3.00 for 
cartridges. 


CAT# TITLE 

Cassettes at $2.00 each 

64001 Androids 

64002 Penetrator 

64004 Casino 1 

64005 Crossfire 

64006 Circuit Board Scramble 

64007 Dragmaster 
64009 Guardian 
64012 Fun Golf 


CAT# TITLE 

64014 Hungry Horace 
64013 Horace Goes Skiing 
64019 Horace and the Spiders 
64021 Blind Alley 
64023 Crasybugs 


Cartridges at 3.00 each 
74001 Androids 
74005 Crasybugs 


$5 Off Tech-Draw Jr. 

You can save $5.00 on the purchase of Tech-Draw Jr. if you 
purchase it at the same time as a TS2C68 trackball. Instead of the 
regular price of 19.95 you can get it for 14.95. See our catalog for a 
complete description of Tech-Draw Jr. and a list of printers that it 
supports. Order Tech-draw Jr. Catalog# C256. 



23 




























CRITICAL MASS 

An arcade game by Durell. 

Distributed by Knighted Computen. Cat#KCl2 $15 95 

SABOTEUR 

A martial arts arcade adventure by Durell, distributed by 
Knighted Computen. Cat#KCl3 $15.95 

MUSICOLA 

Great music program for the TS2068. 

New low pricel Cat#TEJl $9.98. 

GRAPHIST 

G raphic s soft w are from T, E. J. Associ ates. N ew 1 ow price I 

Cat#TEJ2 $9.95 


SOUNDESIGN 

This TS2068 programming utility allows you to design your own 
TS2068 sound effects and musical effects and make them a part of 
your BASIC programs. Wonderfully simple to use. From Arrow 
Software 4: RMG. Cat#RMGl $14.95 

CLONE 

Now you can make backup copies of all of the tapes that you 
thought were unbreakable. New program from RMG Enterprises 
backs up virtually any tape that you can load into the 2068 
including spectrum tapes. Includes very well written 
documentation package. Cat#RMG2 $9 95 

THE KRUNCHER 

From RMG , this utility helps you compress your BASIC programs 
BO that you can squeese more program into your machine. Works 
on TS2068 and Spectrum. Cat#RMG8 $9.95 




Working ZX81 with Zebra 15 day money back 


quarantee. Does not include any documentation, cables or power 
supply. $16,00 

Not Working ZXBVm (as is, usually easy to fix) 3 for $25 

ZX81 Power supplies when purchased with a ZX81 (new) $2.00 


Case of 50 new ZX81 power supplies 
Video Switch (used, working) 

Cassette Cables or Video Cable (used) 
ZX81 Manual (used) 

16K RAM (used, working) 

16K RAM (not working, as is) 


$50 Shipping. 

$ 1.00 
$.50 ea, 
$3.00 
$ 6.00 
$ 2,00 


BOOK BARGAINS 

Here are sotne excellent books still in stock but not in our catalog 
becousc we only have limited quantities available. We'll only take 
phone confirmed orders on these. 

Understanding Your ZX81 ROM by Logan ( 55 left) #0105 $5.00 
Machine Language Made Simple for TSIOOO (21 left) #0106 $5.00 
The Timex Sinclair 2068 Explored by Hartnell (11 left) $5.00 


Zebra Catalog Updates 

The following are typographical and other 
corrections to Zebra’s 1986B Catalog. 

Page 1 - We do not cary Dmnicalc. 

Page 5 - The correct cat# for Profile 2068 is TW02. 

Pnge 6 - The last sentence of the first paragraph is in error. 
New AjfJ TS2068 drives use blacki version 1 wafers. 

Page 8 - The correct catalog numbers for the following 

cartridges are 07-7400 Pinball* 07-7300 Flight Simulator, and for 

cassettes 06-1000 Vu-Calc, 06-1001 Vu-File, 06-1002 Vu-3D, and 
06-3000 Flight Simulator. 

Page 12 “ MTERM 0 Tape is currently priced at $24.95 not 

$29,95. MTERM 11 is not available on cartridge. We no longer 
sell Mini Xmod 1.7. 

Page 14 - We are now sold out of 03-3020 Computer Coach, 
and 03-3016 Conversational Spaniih. 

Page IS - We are now sold out of the following Softsync 

TSIOOO software: SST02 Advanced Budget Manager, SST18 
Mothership. 


TSIOOO Joystick 

Plugs into the back of the TSIOOO and 

allows a standard Atari compatible joystick to work on the 
TSKXM). Includes free joystick games tape. Won’t work on the 
TSISOC. This is a closeout. Only 40 left. Cat#Cl20 $5.00 



SPRITES 2068 

As you may already know, "sprites" are computer graphic 
objects which can be easily and quickly moved around on a 
video screen. Hints of how to write sprite software for the 
T$2068 are given in Timex's TS206S Technical Manual but it 
is not realty adequately explained. 

Now there has been a major breakthrough. After months 
of research, two TS206S diehards: Vernon Tidwell and Ron 
Ruegg, have now figured out how to use sprites on the 
TS2068. And even more importantly, they have written an 
excellent 34 page manual that explains all about if in their 
product called SPRITES 206S. 

It doesn’t matter whether you're a BASIC or machine 
language programmer - with the easy interface of the sprite 
service utility and the superb manual that explains it, you 
will be able to create your own moving sprite graphics. You 
may want to create complete games or just experiment and 
learn more about computer graphics techniques. In either case 
you’ll enjoy the ease and the amazing high speed with which 
your own graphic creations will move. 

SPRITES 206S consists of the 34 page manual and a 
cassette tape. The cassette includes a 2520 byte machine code 
sprite service utility, a SPRITEDRAW BASIC program for 
defining and moving your own sprites (including twelve sprite 
commands), and exciting sprite demonstration programs. 

Considering the quality of this product, its excellent 
documentation, the fact that there isn’t anything else like it 
available, and most importantly what it can do for you on 
your TS2C16S, this is beauty of a program, and a bargain at 
only S19.00. Be sure to order yours now. 

Order Catalog Na u}21 SPRITES 2068 Only $19.00 

ZEBRA SYSTEMS, INC 

7306 ItmiiCB Av<$niie, Wcxxflmvcn NY 11421 (71^ 296'23fl5 


24 






















i 





The Mystery of the Missing 253 


Part Three 


IBv' ui 


WKiC ± 




A Xl-i*inlc Vou 

The heading really says it all. I've been quite pleased and 
encouraged by your response to Part 1 * This is really turning 
into an "interactive series’*# as 1 *d hoped, and I want to invite 
you to keep writing and calling with your ideas and questions. 
Your're truly making these articles much better than I could have 
done alone. 

I wish I could have said all this sooner, but the publi¬ 
cation delays on my end do get in the way, I have to submit my 
"stuff about a month ahead of the publication date. The 
result is that 1*11 be submitting Part 4 about the same time you 
read this. In the same way, your first responses began to come 
just as I submitted Part 2, when it was too late for me to in¬ 
clude a mention of them. 

So you see, there *3 no escaping this little nuisance, and 
I'll just have to be content in extending a late, but very 
sincere thank you. 


" . . .And Now« 1 . , , " 

A number of you deserve much more than just a mention for 
the valuable contributions you've provided. Sadly# that's all I 
can do. Please don't be insulted if I didn't include you here: I 
have to limit this much more than l*d wish. 

The first pat on the back goes to Robert Qrrfelt, from 
Redwood City, CA. He shows that you needn't use my trick to SAVE 
the EkROH code to tape: just put your disassembler into RAM, then 
typer OOT 255,128:CXrr 244,16. This will switch the EXROM into 
chunk 4, starting at hex 8000. Really cleveri If you use a 
Spectrum disassembler, and your emulator is in the cartridge slot 
(as I use), this won't work, since it would require enabling Dock 
and EXROM chunks simultaneously. Also, if you want to disassemble 
in decimal, you can't get the code to start at decimal location 
4000. Still, this should be a big timesaver for almost everyone* 

For reasons to be seen later, I'd like to thank Eric Johnson 
of Orange City# FL, and fellow SIMCUS member Dave Schoenwetter 
for making several "dead" SCLDs available to me. 

Marty Egan of Herndon, VA has also been busily studying the 
EXROM code# and working out Timex's bank switching protocol. I've 
spent a great deal of (very pleasant) time with him over the 
phone, as we compared out notes. I hope my infor was as helpful 
to you as your insights were to me, Marty, I don't just owe you 
one...1 owe you a million. 

Marty has also suggested that I include a cross-reference 
between a few of my terms and some of the acrcffiym-like bank 
switching names that Timex included in a few spots in the Tech 
Manual. I chose to try to "expand" these acronyms in this series, 
to make the text clearer. 


TiPEX N#ni* 
BNA 

ABN 

HS 

HSP 


Ne** '^Inprowd* Nun* Uwd Nerv 

Bank Nunbar Accaas IraQiater B0> 

Aaaignad Bank i IAO, in aatup node} 
Horizontal Sal act (raQlatar 40} 

Unlvnraal Daaalect Byta <AO, In nornal made} 


TInaK alto ra^arrad to HSP aa HS-prlna, but thla aeatrad tan radundant 

I avoid acronyms as much as I can, and was surprised (and 
suitably humbled) when Rick Best, from Largo, FL asked if I 
couldn't include a glossary of terms in my articles: explanations 
of things like AROS, LROS, SCLD, ect. Well, 1*11 certainly be 
glad to explain them, (It's amazing how we can let acronyms be¬ 
come a part of our vocabulary without even realizing iti) 

AROS (Af^lication ROM Oriented Software) and LROS (Language 
ROM Oriented Software) are the two types of cartridge programs 
that the system can run- TM5.0 tells about these in detail. Note 
that AROS and LROS are "nested acronyms": that is, one Of their 
letters actually stands for another acronym. (A sign that these 
things have long since gotten out of hand. I gleefully enjoy 
pointing out such verbal perversities*) 

The term SOLD probably stands for either Semi Custom Logic 
Device, or Standard Cell Logic Device, (both ace true) and 
usually refers to the specially made "workhorse chip" inside the 
TS 2068. It appears that this term was intended to refer to any 


"special" chip to be used in TS 2063 products, and so I've also 
used it to refer to devices that we can only speculate about. 

Another reader who's sent a large amount of infomation is 
William J* Pederson, owner of the Widjup Co, Mr, Pederson tells 
me he has a bank switching system working, which he expects to 
incorporate into a product, Mote that some of his bank switching 
concepts are VERY different from what we'll be discussing here. 
Interested readers may wish to drop him a line to find out what's 
available. 

If you've written me with a request for a reply, please be 
patient. I get swamped sometimes, and my time for writing replies 
is limited. Between queries on my articles in the newsletter for 
the SIMCUS user group and now my articles here, (not to mention 
actually WRITING the articles) things can get very busy. But I 
will get to you just as soon as I can. 


We talked hardware last time, but some updates may be 
useful. You may have noticed that it requires a huge quantity of 
TTL chips to inplement the functions we've described. But there 
may be easier ways to do it. Marty Egan is investigating ways to 
persuade a 74L3S10 chip to do some of the grunt work, and I might 
suggest looking at an AMD2901 bit slice chip to do the same. 

Further, if we wish to rewrite the READ_BS_REG and WR_BS_REG 
routines, as was suggested in Part 1, a really dramatic drop in 
parts count seems possible. Since these routines are the only 
ones that actually access the bank switching hardware, they can 

be changed to control circuitry that's simpler to build. Since we 
already have to make massive bug corrections to both ROMs anyway, 
changing these two is trivial* 

Last time, I said that the RESET signals in my block dia¬ 
grams were probably not what Timex really intended, and that si^ne 
odd "unlock" code was instead intended to disarm some power-on 
"lock up" circuitry. I'd mightily appreciate it if you'd forget 
I'd ever said this. (Sometimes we look at a simple problem and 
imagine complex solutions. Sorry, gang.) The odd code will be ex¬ 
plained later. The reset signal really should be there, but i 
probably doesn't go to the backplane's RESET line. 

This is because the RESET signal desn't go to a pin on the 
standard TS 2068 SCLD either, and so wouldn't reset the standard 
Horizontal Select register. If RESET only worked on an expansion 
bank, then applying that signal could result in some chunks not 
being allocated to any bank. That would hang the machine up, were 
it to exclude chunk 0. 

Were does the signal go, then? A quick look at the sales 
literature for the NCR Corporation's standard cell devices (of 
which the 2068's SCLD is one) shows that they can include a 
power-on-reset circuit right on the chip. I've extracted the 
actual silicon chip from a dead SCLD, and sure enough, near one 
edge, is the large capacitor needed to perform such a function. 

(Well, it LCX5KS large, at &00X mag.) The SCLD circuits needed to 
control an expansion bank probably would have had the same 
function inside. As such, both TS 2068 and its expansion banks 
would have gotten their Horizontal Select registers reset ONLY at 
Power-Up. That way, if an expansion bank were in control of chuzik 
0, and a RESET occurred, someone would still be In control. 

It turns out that Chapt.5 of the "T/S 2068 Intermediate/ 
Advanced Guide" (SAMS) has a tutorial on Extended Bank Switching, 
which has useful information* Unfortunately, that chapter was 
obviously written before the 2068's design cycle was conpleted, 
and a lot of its infocmation has been rendered incorrect by en¬ 
gineering changes in the machine, it shows the old scheme, with 
I/O ports FC and FD as bank switching controls# making no mention 
of the memory mapped I/O scheme we can see in the TS 2068 code* 
It also makes no mention of the Universal Deselect Register, and 
the bank switching exanple given sometimes sends data out in 
nybbles# and sometimes as a byte. 

Among the more useful gems to be found is the fact that bit 
0 of a bank's status byte (bit 0 of register AO, to us) would 
have been set to 0# if that bank had caused an interrupt. The 
"Interrupt Priority", shown in the syscgn table last time, 
affects the final renumbering of the banks* (High priority gives 
a low bank number.) This means that if we poll each bank to learn 
if it caused an interrupt, starting with bank tl and working up- 












ward# we will have automatically first checked the ones that 
demand a fast response. 

As a final {and totally unrelated) hardware note# the de¬ 
signer should use caution in designing a Daisychain circuit* 
Since the clock signal is generated separately by each bank (asJ 
showed it), the Daisychain flip flops aren't really being clocked 
synchronously, as is required for a shift register. This type of 
situation requires the use of master-slave flip flops, or two 
flip flops in a master-slave configuration. This will prevent one 
flip flop from changing its data before the next one clocks it 
in* If all the banks to be used are on the same circuit board 
however, only a single clock signal is needed, and synchronous 
operation is possible. 

This is a reasonable question. With considerable circuit 
complexity and ROM bugs galore, reconstructing the thing would 
first seem like an exercise in self-punishment. There are already 
simpler expansion schemes available. 

As it turns out, this would be a very bad method if all we 
wanted was extra memory. We can now buy HAM cards that plug into 
the cartridge slot# and one of the available disk systems can 
"^switch banks" that overlay one another in the Dock bank. User 
group newsletters have published various "RAM in the Dock slot" 
methods. (I published one in 19841) But the level of 2068 soft¬ 
ware being developed today doesn't even make full use of the 
machine. Why would we need another way to expand it? 

We don't siEnply need more memory, but we CAN use many of the 
ui^ocumented (and presently bug laden) capabilities that are 
hidden in the ROM. If you're aware of the stream-and-channels I/O 
system tht the 2068 uses, you understand how it's possible to 
LOAD in a "print driver" program that redirects the Basic LPRINT 
and LLIST commands to a large printer. The 2068 tries to expand 
on this "Spectrum-based" theme allowing such print drivers# or 
any other software for an intelligent I/O device# to be located 
permanently in an expansion bank. These programs would take up 
NONE of your Home Bank memory and so wouldn't conflict with any¬ 
thing else running there* 

But there's no reason for an I/O device to completely domi¬ 
nate a bank. While the extra memory space could have been taken 


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up by sojnething like an interrupt driven printer buffer# it sould 
also have been possible to include extra RAM# or utilities in a 
ROM* Further banks might have contained a disk operating systein, 
or spiffed-up versions of the 40/64/80 column display utilities 
in the Technical Manual* And they could have been made directly 
accessable from Basicl No PEEKS# POKE^# or USR calls should have 
been needed* 

These things just scratch the surface. The point is that the 
expansion banks, and some extra BEU circuitry similar in function 
to Sinclair's Interface One for the Spectrum# would have easily 
extended the TS 2068's repertoire of Basic coranands to handle 
some very nifty I/O functions# and they'd have been iinmediately 
available when you powered up your machine. We'll begin a dis¬ 
cussion of the 2068'3 I/O system and extended conmands later on. 
Until then# keep in mind that this is where the extended bank 
switching system would have really made the 2063 shinei 

TaK 1 Oat'S O-r O 3. 

Let's first consider Flowchart 2# which describes the BANK 
ENABLE routine in the RAM Resident Code, To use this, we woul? 
first put the bank number in B# and the Horizontal Select byte we 
want for the bank in the C register. This will work for the 
standard banks and expansion banks both. No one really uses it 
for the standard banks at the moment: it's a lot easier to pro¬ 
gram the standard banks directly. As we'll see# that's not the 
case if there are any expansion banks in the system. 

At 64A2, we check if there are any expansion banks. If there 
are, we run some code to deselect the chunks specified from any 
expansion bank that might have them. Note that if no expansion 
bank has them, this can't hurt# and if we're about to give the 
chunks to a bank that already has them# this momentary loss won't 
be noticed. At 64B7# we check if it's the Dock bank we're 
selecting* If so, we program it directly# and we're done. 

If not, we check if we're selecting the EXROM bank* If so, 
we pretty much do the same thing# except the code only allows us 
to give chunk 0 to that bank* Remember# that's the only chunk 
originally intended to be used there. 

If it's not the EXROM bank# then it's either the home bank 
or an expansion bank. In either case# it doesn't hurt to try to 
give it to the home bank# because an expansion bank will override 
this if it has to. We do this at 64EC* The code from 64F6 to 6505 
appears benign# but useless. 

At 6506# we see if we were selecting the Home Bank. If so# 
then we're done* Otherwise, we send the bank number to register 


80 (Bank Number Access), and the the Horizontal Select infor¬ 
mation to register 40* And that's that* 

Flowchart 3 is a bit of an embarassment# because it refer¬ 
ences that incorrect "unlock" scheme I asked you to forget* (You 
don't remember# I hope*) My explanation will correct two errant 
lines in it. Since I first thought this routine controlled 
special hardware# it was mentioned last time. Unfortunately it 

doesn't# and now it would be more appropriate if I first describe 
the routine that CALLS it. That's the routine that builds the 
SYSCOW table. 

OActdv’ # WI-iArA Oo SYSCOMm ComA F'T'OfnT 

Well, we're mature enough in our understanding of bank 
switching that we know that the stork does NOT bring theml The 
high level initialization routine (Flowchart 1# in Pact 1 of this 
series) CALLS the routine to build the table. Shown here in Flow¬ 
chart 4, it works as follows* 

We start by pointing to the SYSCGN table and assuming there 
are no expansion banks (we'll update this assunption if and when 
we find some,) We then transfer the 4 LROS bytes into the SYSCOfi 
table, (TM 5*1,1 explains these bytes.) If no LROS is present# 
the S AROS overhead bytes are transferred (see TM 5.1,2). In 
either case# if the device wasn't present# its space is marked to 
show it inactive. The "bug" described in TM 6.1,4 can be cor¬ 
rected by having the JR at XOAlA go to XOAlE# if no LROS is 
present. 

At X0A3E# we point to the SYSCON space for the first ex¬ 
pansion bank and enter the setup mode* In this mode, anything 
written to register AO will become the Assigned Bank Number of 
the bank selected by the Daisychain. Also# during the bank in¬ 
itialization# the HL register is always supported to point to the 

SYSCON location we're working with. 

At X0A4C, we CALL routine that tries to install a bank 
number# checks to see If it succeeded, and ends the setup mode, 
if not. Returning from that routine, if we've run out of banks^# 
we leave the setup loc 3 p to X0AD4, mark the end of the SYSCCW 
table, and CALL a routine that RE-ASLIGNS the bank numbers# 
according to their value in SYSOON 17, This is called the In¬ 
terrupt Priority, 

[Editor: WCHl Wes# we ran out of space alreadyl And just when it 
was getting good. We will all have to hold on to our hats 'til 
next issue!] 




No# this is not about modemsthis is about using the TS 
2068*s sound chip to have a little fun- We leave it to the 
individual as to how enthusiastic one's fun becomes. 

What we plan on doing here is simulating the tones produced 
by a touch tone type phone. Each button or key on a tone phone 
produces two tones when It is pressed* Since the 2068 has three 
channels Of sound on the sound chip (plus another if you include 
the BEEP command), we easily have enough equipment to do the job* 
In order to find out what tones are used I had to do some 
investigation. Luckily, a friend of mine at the plant where I 
work was taking an electronics course# and had a book at home 
that contained the information.,*and so# we're in business* 
The diagram shows the layout of a standard tone phone key¬ 
pad, TO the left of each row of numbers is the frequency for one 
of the two tones produced by that number key on the phone* At the 
bottom of each column is the frequency for the other tone pro¬ 
duced by that key. For example, if you press the "1" key on a 
phone it simultaneously produces a tone at a frequency of 697 and 
a tone at the frequency of 1209, 

What we need to find is the coarse/fine values for the tone 
registers of the sound chip* On page 194 of the TS 2068 User 
Manual is a short program just for this purpose, A little 
rounding of numbers is required to get the values that come 
reasonably close to producing the tones we need. 


Once this is done# a short subroutine like the one in the 
listing can be written to simulate tone dialing. The example 
listing is based on the assumption that it is part of an address 
book type file. In this case# the file is stored in a string 
array—d$—whose DIMensions are something like 75 different files 
each 128 characters long [DIM d$(?5#12a)]* The phone numbers are 
stored starting at the 117th character in each file. 

Let's review the listing; Line 2850 executes the command to 
open the sound chip channels# A and B, and sets up the FOR/NEXT 
loop for reading the phone number off the file. Lines 2852 and 
2855 skip over characters which are not numerals, but are usually 
found in phone numbers. Line 2657 figures which line further 
belcw to call based on the number it is “reading" and calls it 
[GO SUE 2860+nJ. Lines 2860 thru 2869 do the actual execution of 
the tones. The last digit of the line number corresponds to the 
nuiTber of the telephone key which is being sifrwlated. Line 2870 
off the tones and gives a proper break (silence) between the 
current and next tones- Line 2680 ends the subroutine and RETURNS 
you to your inain program, 

WARNING; You should not use this on your phone as your 2068 
in not FCC approved for use as telephone dialing equipment. This 
is inerely for simulation and fun. You certainly don't want the 
boys from Washington knocking on your door. 

Enjoy your Tone/Phone 20631 


2640 
Z64Z 

2632 

2635 
2637 

2636 

2646 

2641 

2642 

2643 

2644 

2643 

2644 

2647 
2646 
264^ 
2676 
2673 
2666 


PRINT 'Pf*** D to dial* 
60 TO 2642*(INK6V4>*d*) 


60UNa 7.40: FOR d-117 TO 126 
IF dKfXdJ-*-* |HK£N 60 TO 2673 
IF dttTMd}-* - THEN 60 TO 2666 
LET n-VAl, (dt(F>(d>): PRINT HU GO 
CO TO 2876 

SOUND 8*13iO.lS^6*ll4il*0#2.62i3,0: 
SOUND 8*13t0*1310*13411.012,96)3,6; 
SOUND 0 1 13 f 9 I 1 31e * 1 34 I 1 . 0 1 2 , 621 3 P 6 ; 
SOUND 6.13 1 9 P 13 I 0 1 134i1 ,01 2, 74) 3 , a: 
SOUND 6,1319.13)0,142ilr0i2,96)3*6: 
SOUND 6,l3l9>13)fl*l42il.0i2,B2l3.0; 
SOUND g * 13i9 P13)0 * 142#1.e12 P 74 13,0: 
SOUND 8,13i9,13i0*126ilpei2p96i3.0^ 
SOUND 6,1319.131e,126«1> 612,62)3 * 0: 
SOUND 6.1319 p13)e.1261 1P 012 * 74 ) 3 * 0: 
PAUSE 10: SOUND 6*0#9.0: PAUSE 1 
NEXT d 
RETURN 



SU6 2640+ 

RETURN 

RETURN 

RETURN 

RETURN 

RETURN 

RETURN 

RETURN 

RETURN 


RETURN 


RETURN 



E97 

1 

2 

3 

77® 

4 

5 

6 

852 

i 

7 

8 

9 


i 

e 

S 


1209 

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SIMPLY MUSIC 



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tiiitttttiitttttttttintttattttit 

20 PAPCR Ii BORDER li INK 7s C 
LS t PRINT AT 10f7j FLASH 1J*PRe 
PARINtG SCDRE“i DO 3UB OOOO 

30 LET p^O* LET vb>l3s LET v»* 
LET va«I3] LET ^«0i DO SUB 5 


13i 

00 

40 


hl-Oi LET tfl-Oi LET #1- 


0 

50 LET b-Oi LET d-Oj LET f-0 
fiO LET b«b-lt LET d^d-li LET T 
-f-1 

70 IF lNlCEVt<>"“ THEN 


DO SUB 


200 


75 IF q THEN PRINT AT 10,15j" 

» 

76 IF NOT q THEN PRINT AT 10, 
I3t ^7^ 

77 LET q«NQT q 

00 IF b<>0 AND p THEN >8,0 
as IF b<-0 THEN LET bl-bl-t^li 
LET b-mll,3,blli LET »v-v«i IF « 
il,I,bl}-0 THEN LET «v-0 
90 IF d<-0 AND p THEN >P,0 
IF d<-0 THEN LET dl-dl+ls 


LET d-*<2,3,dl)i LET awai if « 
t2,l,dl>-0 THEN LET av-0 
lOO IF f<wO AND p THEN >10,0 
105 IF ■f<-0 THEN LET fl^tl*lj 
LET LET bvvbs IF « 

(3, l,fl]«^0 THEN LET bv-0 
no IF bl>nl DR dl>n2 OR -f 1 >n3 
THEN GO TO 400 

120>0,ftCl,l,bl})l,*(l,2,bn s2,m 

I2,l,dl3 I3,si2,2,dnf4,v(3,l,f 1> 
l5,m(3,2,fll;a,»v|9,.av|l0,bvi DO 
TO 60 

190 REn Adjust Svttlrpga 
200 LET 14-INKEY*1 IF !*»-“ THE 
N RETURN 

210 IF Oft !*-"&• THEN L 

ET vb-vb + li IF vb>15 THEN LET v 


b-0 

320 IF OR im--*- THEN L 

ET va*va + lt IF v*>lS THEN LET v 

• -0 

230 IF DR It-'m'* THEN L 


P 

14 


ET vH-v's-i-ls IF v«>l5 THEN LET v 

c-O 

240 IF 1*-“S' OR i *-■*»" THEN P 
RINT AT 12, Oj "SOPRANO “?AT 12 
,8:; VS) at 12, 13) > FOR 1-1 TO vft 
PRINT PAPER Ej" ")j NEJtT Is 
i*vs TO 13i PRINT PAPER Ij** 
t NEXT i 

250 IF i*-"A'* OR i*-"*" THEN 
RINT AT 14,Oi"ALTO “lAT 

,B)va)AT 14,13)1 FDR 1-1 TO vat 
PRINT PAPER i.l*' ‘')i NEXT It FOR 
i-va TO 15s PRINT PAPER 1)* *i 
t NEXT 1 

260 IF DR l*-«b* THEN P 

PINT AT 16,0)“BASE “jAT 16, 

B;vb)AT ]6,13f] FDR i—I TD vbi P 
PINT PAPER 2)“ *11 NEXT li FDR 
1-vb TO 15t PRINT PAPER Ij* -j s 
NEXT i 

270 IF i*-"p* OR i*-“p" THEN L 
ET p-NOT pi PRINT AT ia,Oj*FTiras 
ing is (“not * AND py|:”L*gato. 

200 RETURN 

400>B,0)9,0110,Os PRINT 40)AT I 
,2)“Pr»** any K*y to Continue,"* 
PAUSE Oi GO SUB 500s GO TO 40 
500 CLS t PRINT AT 3,B)*Slaiplv 
rki*ic“i PRINT AT 6,0)t*i LET it- 
"S"t GO SUB 2401 LET i*-“A“t GO 
SUB 230t LET i*-"B"i GO SUB 260 
SlO PRINT AT 20,0) "Press S ’fof' 
SOPRAM3, A #or fa^TO B B 

ASE, P for PHRASING* 

520 PRINT AT 18,0)“PHrasing is 
"l (“not " AND pJI"Legato. * 

330 PRINT 40) INVERSE 1)" Press 
“"ENTER** to Start Song. “ 

540 GO SUB 200t IF i«<>CHR« 13 
THEN GO TO 340 

330 PRINT 40)AT 0,0)TAD 31)" ") 

TAB Si)" "j return 

eooo Din s{3,3,4oon>0,0) i,0)2,0 

)3,0)7,36)8,0)9,0)10,0)11,50)12, 
120)13,10 

aOOl RESTORE BlOOt READ t«i READ 
nit FOR i-1 TD nit FOR J-1 TO 3 
t READ s{l,J,£li NEXT Ji NEXT i 


o . 


mic 


0002 RESTORE BllOi READ n2t FDR 
i-1 TO n2E FDfl J-1 TO 3i READ si 

2, J,in NEXT Ji NEXT t 

©003 RESTORE S120i READ n3i FOR 
1-1 TO n3l FOR J-1 TO 3s READ s( 

3, J,l»s NEXT Jl NEXT i 

B004 DATA 0,192,32,16,60,60,60,2 
53,0,3,4,B,60,60,60,233 

aoOS RESTORE 0004i FDR i-0 TD 15 
t READ bt POKE USR *a“+i,toi NEXT 

0006 RETURN 
B098 REn 

Canon in D 
by Pachebsl 



^ XSJCT 







0099 REM 
0100 DATA 


SOPRANO 

* Canon in D 

by Pacheb 

et“,S6,119,1,B,245,l,B,190,1,0,0 

4,2,B,51,2,a,239,2,a,31,2,B,243, 
1,0,74,0,0,04,0,6,94,0,0,99,0,0, 
112,0,8,125,0,3,112,0,8,99*0,0,7 
4,0,3,84,0,6,94,0,6.99,0,3,112,0 

,e,125,0,0,112,0,6,99,0,8 
0101 DATA 74,0,3,64,0.0,94,0,6,9 
9.0,6,112,0,0,125,0,6,112,0,6,99 
.0,0,74,0,9,04,0,3,94,0,6,99,0,6 
,112,0,6,125,0,0,112,0,0,99,0,8 
8102 DATA 74,0,0,84,0,3,94,0,0.9 
9,0,0,112,0,5,123,0,6,112,0,6,99 
,0,0,74,0,8,04,0,0,94,0,8.99,0,3 
,112,0,6,125,0,6,117,0,0,99,0,20 
0109 REn fiiL TO 

0110 DATA 120,119,1,3,245,1,0,19 
0,1,0.84,2.6,51,2,0.239,2,6,51,2 
.8,245,1,0,119,1,6,245,1,0,190,1 
,6,64,2,0,31,2,6,239,2,0,51,2.6. 
243,1,6,94,0,0,99.0,6,112,0,0.12 

5.0,6,141,0,0,149,0.8,141,0,0,16 
7,0,0 

Bill DATA 94,0,4.125,0,4.99,0,4, 
125,0,4,112.0,4.149,0,4,125,0.4, 

149,0,4,141.0,4.160.0,4,149,0.4, 
100.0,4,141,0,4,183,0.4,167,0.4. 
141.0,4,74.0,2.125,0,2,94*0,2.12 
5,0.2.99.0,4,123*0,4.94,0.2,149, 
0*2*112,0.2,149,0.2,125,0.4,149. 
0.4.112*0*2,100,0.2,141.0.2,180* 
0,2,149*0*4,100,0,4,112.0,2,160* 
0,2,141,0.2,166*0,2,167,0.4,141. 
0.4 


6112 DATA 74,0,2,125.0.2*94*0.7. 
125.0,2,64*0,2.123,0,2,99,0*2,12 
3,0*2,94,0,2.149,0*2,117.0*7,149 
,0.2,99.0.2,149*0,2,123,0*2,149, 

0,2.112,0,2.180,0.2,141,0.2,133* 
0*2,125,0,7.100,0,2,149.0,2,166, 
0,2,112*0,2.103.0,2,141.0,2,163* 
0,2*99,0,2*167,0,2,125,0,2,141,0 

f 2" 

8113 DATA 94,0,2.123.0*2,94,0,2. 
123,0.2*99.0,2,123*0,2,99,0*2,12 
5,0,2*112,0,2, 149,0.2,112,0,2.14 
9,0,2,123,0,2,149*0*2,123*0,2,14 

9*0,2,141,0,2,103*0,2,141,0,2,IS 
0,0,2.149*0,2*133*0*2,149,0*2*16 
0.0*2,141*0*2,133*0,2,141.0,2*10 
0,0,2,125*0,2,167*0*2,125,0*2.14 
1*0*14 

0119 REn BASE 

8120 DATA 56*119,1.3,245,1,0.190 

, 1 * 8 * 04 * 2 . 0 , 51 , 2 , 6 , 239 , 2 , 3 , 51 , 2 * 

8*243,1,6,119*1,0,243,1*0,190.1, 

8,64,2*0*31,2,6,239,2.6,51,2,8,2 

4S,1,0*119,1*0,243,1,8,190,1,3,0 
4,2,a,^1,2,8* 239,2,0,31,7,0* 243. 
1*0 

6121 DATA 119,1,0,243*1,0,190.1, 
8*84,2.0.31,2,0,239,2,3*51,2.3,2 

43*1,0*119,1*3*245.1,0*190*1,0,0 

4*2*0*31.2,3*239*2,0,51,2*0*243, 

1* 0*119,1,6* 745,1,8 190,1,0,34.2 
*6,51,2,3,239*2,0.31,2*6*245,1,0 
0122 BATA 119*1,0.243,1*3,190.1, 
3,84,2,0.31,2,0*239,2,3,51*2*0,2 

45*1,0,119,1*0*245.1,0,190,1.0,6 

4,2,0*51.2,8*239.2.0,51*2.0,243, 
1*0.119,1,0*745,1.3,190*1*0*04,2 
,0,31,2,3,739.2*3.31,2*6*245,1.2 
0 

9999 SAVE “Simply M" LINE 


-gives yoji tie prettiest letters that 
you* 11 ever see from a coaputer^ It*B DATA 
BASE Jets you edit and move data at tflll. 
Ft*s KAIL MERGE Jets you create or LOAD sail 
list files far PERSONAL FORK LETTERS. 
HEADERS, FOOTERS, BLOCK INDENT, Repeat Print 
reports, do InYolces, outlines, AUTO 
LETTERHEADS, AHTO SIGN OFFl A caaplete 
ADMINISTRATIVE PACKAGE far hoae or office, 
$39. 95 CJiecl' or M/0.^ 

Specify type of Interface, and for 
Cassette, Micro Dr, or AERCO FD Disk, 
Supports all printers, TO page illustrated 
aanual, plus phone Info service. 
Guaranteed. 

Bill Jones, CuJ/ ^fJcro Electronics, 
1317 Stratford Ave, Panama City, FL 32404. 
904-371-4513 Inquiries Nsicojoe. 




SIHPLT f^ic la an all Baaic program that uaea th# thrn 
SCUND qhannala of tha TS 2063 to create njaic* Each "voice’ can 
be adjusted before and while the rauaic ia placing (although the 
jruaic ia interupted while the adjuatment la made). Phrasing can 
be aelected as Legato (amooth], or not amooth, h tiny iDetrcmofne 
ticks off the beata while the nxiaic playa* 

The program creates a "maical ecore" by READing In values 
from Data atatenants* Each tone conaiats of three partSp a FINE 
TUNE value* a COARSE TUNC value, and the duration (in beats). See 
chapt*21 of the 2068 User Hanual. Note durationa are all rela- 
tiva, but in the present aong, a HtfXE note geta 8 beata p a HALF 
note geta 4, a OUAFTER note geta 2, and an EIGHTH not* gets 1 
beat* RESTS are Input aa 0 (earo). The HUStCAL 50CRE begins with 
the DATA statement in line 8100, First ia a title (in quotea). 
The first nin^r is the nimber of notea played by this voice. 
Voice 1 in this caae la the Soprano voice* Ttia second nijat>er 
le the FINE tune value, the third value (1) la the CCARSE 
tune value* and th* fourth nuitber ia the duration of the firat 
tone, B beats, a whole note* The following nusbers continue to 
define th* iwsical score of vole* one, Lina 3110 starts the 
nuslcal ecor* of vole* two, Th* firat mmfcer defines the nui^r 
of tones (and teats] played by this voice. This is followed by 
th* values that dafin* these tones, Lin* 8120 starts th* luaical 
score for the third voice* 

This particular arrangement of "CANON IN D" starts with all 
three voices in hannony. and it sounds as if there is only one 
voice. After a few bars* th* aecond voice appears* and a abort 
tim* later* the third. Though simple* the music is effectiveI 

Listing botesj Lines 75 and 76 each hava a "7“ in quotes. 
Thee* are UDG "A" and "B" characters reflectively. These are the 
tiny metronome defined in lines 8004 and 3005, Lines 80 , 90* 
100, 120* 400, and 8000 all have "hracketa" in them. This ia 
really the Basic 80 und command* and lauat be typed with th# key¬ 
word SOtMD. About the only way to debug this song, is to listen 
as it plays and seek out the "kinks’. When you INPUT data from a 
printed score* you can actually follow the maic one voice at a 
tin* and find your errors. If the program plays too alow, it can 
be speeded up by deleting lines 70 to 77, If you want only Legato 
(smooth)* delete lines 80* 90, and 100 also. SAVE the program to 
tape after you have typed It in by ’RUNing 9999", The pcograin 
will auto-run when It loads, "PREPARING SCORE" will flaeh on the 
screen as the DATA is read. When coiif>leted, you will be able to 
adjust th# voices by pressing "S’ for Soprano (voice 1), "A" for 
Alto (voice 2), and "0" for Baas (vo'ic* 3). Press ’P" to t^ange 
the phrasing. Press "ENTER" to play the song, 

28 




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The FootePrint 
Printer Interface 

• foT Cchcronics pinllel printers 

4 works in both 2066 and Spectrum mode 

• cdmpatible with OS-64 6t Spectrum emulators 

• EPROM socket and on/off switch on board 

• works with both Tasman and Aerco driver software 

• plup into cartridge dock—door completely 
closes with cable running back under computer 

• frees up rear edge connector allowing other 
peripherals to be used; less chance of a crash 

• print driver software for LPRINT* LLIST, and 
COPY included for 2066 and Spectrum modes 

Foote Print Interface w/iofcware £l cable 
FootePrint with OS-64 option included , ,$65^ 
Bare board £l instructioni only .$15®® 

Cable only for use with bare board ..... . .S 15“® 
All prices are pre-pa id and include shipping charges. 

FDQTE’^ SQFTlUPiBE 

R O. Box 14635 — Qainesvjlle. FL 32604 
904/462-1086 (6 pm ■ 9 pm EDT) 


































* 



by Paul Bingham 


large and warm response to the LTLTRA-EIAS^ DESIGNER 
GRAPHICS Program for the 2068 (which appeared in the July/August 
1986 issue of Time Designs attests to the many 2068 users 
yearning for ways to use UDGs effectively. Many sent listings of 
enhancements they had added# some sent tapes, one wrote to say 
he had been looking for this program for a long, long time and 
wished I had written it sooner. 'Truth is, so do II I think all 
this renewed interest in our 2068's graphic prograirming abil¬ 
ities is great. 

In the first article I made mention, "that there were only 
21 of themr"-^DGs that is. Mell, as things turn out I was wrong 
again! So what appears here is son® new program lines to soup up 
the old version 1.0 so it will do 115 UDGs at a whack instead of 
just 21. I call it "SON OF UDG", 

Now if you crack your 2068 manual open to page 262 you will 
find the name CHARS listed. By reading the content note you will 
discover that by altering the address in CHARS we can set up an 
alternate table of letters and symbols in RAM and the 2068 will 
use them Instead. How exciting 1 Hew symbols, new fonts, new 
graphics—its all possible, CHARS covers the Character set 
starting with the space (ccxie 82} and through to the copyright 
symbol (code 127). This is in diference to an article on fonts X 
just read in SWN. The entire set is not pointed to by CHARS, 
only CHR$ codes 32 through 127. 

Check the listing of these characters in the manual's 
Appendix B (page 240 and on). Now lets experiment. Type in the 
short Listing II. This looks in the table in ROM and lists the 
values for each of the eight bytes which conprise each char¬ 
acter. Character #124 and 1126 list eight bytes the same as the 
rest, but the manual states they are STICK and FREE. What the 
table lists produces a vertical bar symbol and a reverse quote, 
just like the SPECTRUM, But elsewhere in the ROM, the 2068 
ignors this and prints STICK or FElEE...two commands the SPECTRUM 
does not have. Because of this fluke "SON OF UDG" ignors #124 
and #126 as well, so as not to cause problems. 


Figure 1 

120 = 0 , 0 , 63 , 4 . 0 , 16 , 40 , 63 , 0 , 

121=0 # 0,63 ,63,63 , 60 , 4 , 56 . 

122 = 0 , 0 , 124 . , 8 , 16 , 32 , 124,0 , 

123 = 0 , 14 , 3 , 48 , 8 , 8 , 14 , 0 , 

124 = 0 , 3 , 8 , 8 , 8 , 8 , 8 , 0 , 

125 = 0 , 112 , 16 , 12 , 16 , 16 , 112 , 0 , 
126 = 0 , 20 , 40 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 

127 = 60 , 66 , 153 , 161 , 161 , 153 , 66 , 60 , 


Figure 2 



The program keeps track of what CHARS is set to at any 
given time, but in your own programs you imist change the con¬ 
tents back to the original values before, say breaking or 
listing. If you don*t every symbol will become total gibberish* 
In that case try POKES to put things as they were: 23606 should 
be 0 and 23607 should be 60* In the program OGSUB 610 will per¬ 
form the same service. 

The "SON OF UDG" program uses all the same keys as the 
original plus the "a" key which is a screen toggle. One is the 
old graphic work slate, the other is a current list of 115 
Characters (see Fig*2)* You will be asked upon switching screens 
if you will be returning or wish the work slate's contents dis¬ 
played* This is so if you toggled in mid-stream to check some¬ 
thing that your current efforts won’t be obliterated* SAVE and 
LOAD have also been modified to proper size for all 115* 

In order to get your old listing up to "SON OF UDG" status 
you will need to do the following: 

1. DELETE lines 10 thru 20, 36 thru 39, 43 thru 110 
350 thru 520, 9010 thru 9050, 9095 thru 9120, 9220 
thru 9225, line 25, and line 200 
2- Alter ''6536Q, 159" in lines 20 St 29 to "64590, 941" 
3. Alter "20'' in line 190 to "750" 

4* Alter line 9060 by removing "PAPER 5:'* command 
5* Alter line 1 to include "SON OF" so you know later 
6. Add all the lines of Listing #2 

And thats all there is to it! You are of course welcome to 
make any alterations or enhancements you wish to the program 
(Several found grids on the work slate to be helpful last time# 
for exanple] * * *and feel free to send ideas and cocnnents to me 
also. If you would like a conplete listing of the entire "SON OF 
UDG" program the way it is supposed to look, just mail a dollar 
and 1*11 send you one. Write Paul Bingham, P,0* Box 2034, Mesa, 
A2 85204. (If you're not up to typing, 1 will send copies of 
the complete program on tape for $5.) 

Listing 1 

i REM 2068 CHR$ Table Peeiier 

10 FOR f=32 TO 127: PRINT f;"= 

I' I J ^ 

^ 20 FOR l=faS+l536e TO f*a+lS36 

30 PRINT PEEK i :: 

40 NEXT t: PRINT NEXT f 


Listing 2 

10 CLEAR 64597; GO 5US 300- FO 
R t=15616 TO 16334; POKE it+4398 
2J,PEEK 1 : NEXT t: FOR 1=65523 T 
O 6SS35: READ 0: POKE t.O: NEXT 


1: FLASK 0; CL5 ; GO SU© 9015; G 
0 SU8 9520; DATA 0,0,63,252,252, 

248,0,0 


20 

DIM 

K (257) : DIM C (4) : 

FOR 

t 

=1 TO 

i 4: 

LET C (t) = 

32: NEXT 

t ; 

DI 

M d(32): 

DIM U 1203 

; LET 

cs 

=7: 

LE 

T at = 

7 : LET px=5: 

LET py 

=1 

; INPU 

T "Press 

ENTER to 

continue 

ri 

■ ■ ■ 


$: GO 

1 TO 

105 




25 

GO TO 350 





36 

0 

37 

0 

33 

Lrr 

S =1: LET 


GO 

TO 

41 

LET 

S=9; LET 

qx *1: 

GO 

TO 

41 

LET 

S=17; LET 

qx=0; 

GO TO 

4 

10 






39 

LET 

S=25: LET 

qx=i; 

GO TO 

4 

10 







42 

INPUT "Ist:"; 

C tl) i '■ 

2nd ; " 

j C 

<2J ^ ■■ 

3rd:";C(3);" 

4th ‘ " 


i4) 



43 IF ci=90O0 THEN GO 8US 350; 


GO SUB 600: PRINT AT 0,1;CHP* C 
(1>;CHR* c(2HflT l,l;CHRi c(3);C 
HR$ C(4): GO SUB 610; FOR t=6 TO 
18 STEP 4: PRINT AT 0,t;c(l+(t- 
6)/4): NEXT t; PAPER 1; RETURN 


29 







Pk iB 


tS = 


FOR t =1 TO 4.: IF t < =2 
LET yl=l; LET Xl=tIMT 
0+i; GO TO ^6 

4^5 LET yl:c9: LET x 1 = (INT tt^O/ 
12))*S+4 

46 IF C(t)>143 THEN LET h=(t it 
j-144J*3+65363: GO TO S3 

47 let h=(c(t)-321*3+64593 

S3 FOR m=h TO h+7: LET al:?PEEK 

m 

64 FOR <45:3 TO 1 STEP -Ir LET a 
l=al/2- IF ifTT ai-rai THEN PRPER 
O: PRINT ftr yi,Xl+g;CHR$ 143. ; L 
ET al^INT al: GO TO 66 

65 PAPER 7: PRINT AT yl,Xl+9.C 
HRS 123; 

66 NEXT 9: LET yl=yl+l; NEXT m 

NEXT 1: RETURN 

103 GO sue 9033: GO SUB 9520 

105 PAPER 1: PRINT AT CS.26;" 

; PAPER 7: PRINT AT CS.26;CHR* I 
64: IF C1=9600 THEN GO SUB 3000: 

80 TP 110 

107 GO SUB 600: GO SUB 610 

110 PAPER 1: PRINT AT CS.2S 

IF CODE lNKr/S=Sl THEN LET 
C£+l GO TO 120 

200 IF CODE INKEY$=97 THEN GO 5 
UB Ci 

210 GO TO 105 

350 PAPER 7: IF Ci=9000 THEN PR 
INT AT 0,1;" ", AT 0,6;" ";AT 

0,10;" ";AT 0,14;" ";AT 0,13 

" AT 1,1;" ", AT 21,16;" 

": RETURN 

360 FOR m*21 TO 24: GO SUB m: N 
m : RETURN 

FOR h=x TO X+7: FOR 1=9 TO 
y+7; PRINT AT h.t;GHR4 123 NEXT 

X : NEXT b: RETURN 

410 INPUT "CHRt Number(Ctt) as S 
tc^rag£:"ivn: IF vn>31 AND vn<12S 

AND vn<>l24 AND vn<>l2B OR xn>l 
43 AND vn«165 THEN LET £=vn: GO 
TO 420 

415 INPirr "Illegal, entry!—hit 
ENTER";v$: GO TO 410 
420 IF €>127 THEN LET J=INT (£/ 
LET iu=€- 143: LET i =65360+3*111 

GO TO 430 

LET i=INT (S/8): LETyy=e*3a 
i =64590+8*m 

LET ru=S: FOR t =i TO i+7: P 
OKE t,dtru): LET ru=ru+l; NEXT t 
435 PAPER 7: IF Ci=900G THEN GO 
TO 530 

500 LET LET f=€: FOR b=13 

+J TO 21: GO SUB 600: PAINT AT h 
,11;CHR* €;AT b,23;CHRS f- GO 5U 
e 610; PRINT AT b,13;li;AT h,19i 
f,: PAPER S: BRIGHT 1; PRINT 
;: PAPER 7; BRIGHT O: 

3: LET f*f+l: NEXT h 
505 IF CODE CMRt €=124 OR CODE 
CHRS £=126 THEN RETURN 
510 GO 5US 600: FOR h=19 TO 21: 
PRINT AT b,j+l;CHRS €: NEXT h 


- +B 


8 ) 


1+ $* 


LET fci=fci+ 


9X = 


GO 


9 X =2: LET 


520 IF j(2 THEN PRINT AT 19,J+7 
;CHAS €: GO 5UB 610: RETURN 
525 PRINT AT 20,j+S;GHR$ e 
5US 610 RETURN 
530 IF €<S0 THEN 
gy=23- GO TO 560 
535 IF €^70 THEN 
9y=48: GO TO 560 
540 IF €<90 THEN LET 9X=10: LET 
gy=60: GO TO 560 
545 IF €<110 THEN LET gx=14; 

T gy=83 r GO TO 560 
550 IF €<128 THEN LET gx=19: 

T 9 y= 10 S: GO TO 560 

LET gx=24: LET gy=l43 
PRINT AT 21,16,1,AT 0,6+INT 
(S/8)*4;" ";AT 0,6 + lNT ts/3) * 

4,€: GO SUB 600: PRINT AT 9X,1+I 
NT (s/17i;CHR$ €;AT gy-£,9x;CHRS 
t: GO SUB 610: RETURN 
600 POKE 23606,86: POKE 23607,2 
51: RETURN 

610 POKE 23606,0: POKE 23607,60 
: RETURN 

785 IF Ci=9600 THEN GO SUB CS+2 
0: RETURN 

790 IF ci=9OO0 AND C£=S OR CS=8 
OR C£>15 THEN GO 5U8 CS+20: 

URN 

795 RETURN 


300 FLASH 1: PRINT AT 17,3;"JeS 

em€ neti": return 

9000 GO SUB 9015: INPUT "Display 

previous upon? ";ns IF ni<>"n" 

THEN LET tX=5: LET ty=l; FOR t= 
1 TO 256; GO TO 9003 

9001 RETURN 

9003 IF *;(t)=l THEN PAPER 0; PR I 

NT AT ty,tx;CHRi 143: PAPER 7: G 
0 TO 9010 

9005 PRINT AT ty,tX;CHRj 123 
9010 LET tX=tX+l: IF tX>20 THEN 
LET lx=5: LET ty=ty+l 

t: GO SUB 34 RETURN 
Ci=960O: BORDER 1: PAPE 
R 5: BRIGHT 1: FOR t=0 TO 21; PR 
INT AT t,0;" 

' - NEXT t 

9225 PAPER 7: BRIGHT 0 
9520 PAPER 1: BRIGHT 0: 

TO 21: PRINT AT t,26;" " 

9530 BRIGHT 1: FOR t=0 TO 21: 

IHT RT t,27;" ": NEXT t 

9540 BRIGHT 0: PRINT AT 0,27, 
RSE";AT 7,27;"SUATH";AT 8,27;"SR 
UE ”;AT 9,27;"CODES";RT 15,27; '5 
TORE";AT 21,27;"PRINT" 



t = 
NEXT t 


9550 BRIGHT 1 : LET a=23; LET 4=1 
: GO SUB 9500 

9560 LET j=10: GO SUB 9500: LET 
j=16: GO SUB 9500 
9570 PRINT AT 6 ,a;"roiil": PAPER 7 
: BRIGHT 0: RETURN 

9600 INPUT "Returning to current 
u;oni7 ";nS: IF ntt>"n" THEN pap 

ER 7 GO SUB S00: LET tx=5: LET 
tys:l; FOR 1=1 TO 256: GO TO 9602 

9601 GO TO 9608 

9602 IF INT CATTR 11y , tX)/SS <>7 
THEN let Rtt)=l: GO TO 9605 

9603 LET fc(t)=0 

9605 LET tx=tx+l; IF tx>20 THEN 
LET tx=5: LET ty=ty+l 

9606 NEXT t 

9606 LET Ci=9000; FLASH O 
R 5. PAPER 5: BRIGHT 0 
TO 21: PRINT AT t,0;" 

": NEXT t 
xp =32; 

X t =0 ; 


BORDE 
t = 


9610 
=49 : 
720 
20 
P=43; 
9630 
P=63 ; 
9640 
P =8 3 ; 


bb =0 : 
lyp = 



LET y p 
GO SUB 


Xt =11 


U;P =103 


XP =50 

Xt =4 
XP=70 
Xt = 

Xp = 

X t =12: 

XP =100: 

GO 5US 9720 
xp =110 


LET yp=69; LET U> 
00 3US 9720 
LET yp=89: 

GO SUB 9720 

U|& —QQ - 

GO SUB 9720 
yp=109: 



Ul 


lU 



yp=127: L 
GO SUB S720 
yp=l64: 

LET bb=l: 


X 1 =16 

9670 LET XP=144: 

WJp=143: LET xt=21 
SUB 9720 

9680 RARER 7: PRINT AT 0,6; 

": PAPER 
16,25;" 'iAT 16,19; 

- ";AT 0,0;"1 3";AT 1,0;"2 


i 

¥<¥ 


PRINT 
";AT 18,19 

4 


9690 PRINT AT 0,5;"1";AT 0,9;"2" 
;fiT 0,13;"3",AT 0,17;"4"; BRIGHT 
1: PRINT AT 3,0;"Ctt:";flT 0,21;" 
UDG:AT 20,16;"addr:"; PAPER 7 
BRIGHT 0: PRI^^^ AT 21,16, "63553 
";AT 0,1," ";AT 1,1;” " 

9700 BRIGHT 0: RETURN 

9720 FOR z»xp TO yp : LET aa=z-U!p 

: PAPER 5: BRIGHT bb: PRINT AT a 

9730^POKE 23606,86: POKE 23607,2 
51: PAPER 7: BRIGHT Or PRINT CHR 
% z: POKE 23606,0: POKE 23607,60 
: NEXT 7 : RETURN 


Renew Yxir 
Subscript ion l^ay 


XMEX RELAXeO BSS* 


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30 


GREAT BOOKS 
FOR YOUR SINCLAIR 

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CONTROl THINGS with your 
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ZXBli Programming (or Pool Applicalions 

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BASIC2 text.... Ex tending the use of MTERMII 

by Michael E. Carver 


lEntftr la ihdv* BASIC 

I Call via PftIKT USB 


If you have spent any time on a local Bulletin Board 
System, you will have certainly found the mighty, but humble, 
TS 2068 in the minority* I have had the occasion to offer BASIC 
programs to fulfill a few BBS users^ requests* However, Sinclair 
BASIC is incompatible with other computer BASICS. With the help 
of BASIC2text, one can upload a Sinclair BASIC program via MTERM 
II to another brand of computer* On the receiving end, the re¬ 
ceiver can print out the text/program and key it into their 
ccnrputer, making needed alterations. Some computers can compile 
a text file into BASIC format, allowing some receivers to simply 
tailor the text file to their system requirements without having 
to key in the program* 


Sinclair BASIC is stored in the machine using many control 
codes (number slugs, floating point numbers, line length, ect.) 
and single codes for Tokens (IP, THEN, GO TO, ect*)* BASIC2text 
will remove any non-ASCII control codes and expand the Tokens to 
their full ASCII equivalents. 

To use &A5IC2text, first tX}AD a BASIC program, set RAHTOP 
to G4900 (CLEAR 64899), then LOAB in the machine code version of 
BASIC2text (LOAD *BASIC2text"CODE 64900). BASIC2text is run in 
two separate steps* PRINT USR 64909 will move the actual BASIC 
program to high memory, allowing room to build the text file. 
When this step is complete, a message will appear on the screen 
prompting you to Press Any Key to reset memory* RATfrOP will be 
raised to 28416, protecting the area for the text file* The 
screen will black out and the copyright message will appear. The 
machine is now ready to translate the moved BASIC into a text 
file (use PRINT DSR 65042}* The program will new convert 
Sinclair BASIC to an ASCII text file starting at 28416. When the 
translation is complete, a message will appear on the screen 
providing information on the start of the text file and its 
length* Follow the prompts to SAVE a copy to tape. IWPORTANT 
NOTE: Both routines must be called with the PRINT USR* * .not the 
commonly used RANDOMIZE USR* This will insure that the messages 
will appear on the screen. 

To send the text file via MTERH II, load MTERM*s buffer 
with the text file. 1 prefer to use LOADER IV* If the length of 
the text file is larger than the buffer area, it should be saved 
in two parts, allowing two smaller text files to be loaded and 
sent separately via MTERrt. 

BONUS: I have two different printer-drivers for a full-size 
printer, both of \^ich do not faithfully reproduce a BASIC 
listing. By using the text file produced by BASIC2text, a 
faithful copy of the listing can be sent to a full-size printer* 
Set the driver*s margin to 32 characters wide, and use the 
following BASIC program to print it to your printer: 


iO FOR X-atart of text file TO 
«n4 Of text file; LPRINT CHR* PE 
EK X;: NEXT X 


ENTERING BASIC2t»xt 

in order to save space, I have not provided a BASIC program 
to install the machine code* If you have access to an assefnbler 
I would suggest enterign the program via the mnemonics. If you 
do not have and asembler or a favorite machine code loader use 
Listing 2, and enter the OP Code column in the DATA statement 
lines* 


the author can provide a copy of this program on tape for 
$4.00 (includes shipping). Please send a check or money order 
to; Michael E. Carver, 1016 NE Tillamook, Portland, CE 97212. 
Please specify "BASICZtext"* 


nun galls 

NE U aqu DD 1 D 

PR_STRIHa aqu 21DB 
TD_TABLE *qa 009S 

PO^SEakch aqu *770 

K_SCAN aqu D2BO 


Lifting i 


SYETER VARIABLES 

PROS aqu 3C37 
VARS aqu SCAB 
RARTOF aqu SC8Z 



ORIOtM 

FDa4 Cd4TG0dl 


Addr* 

«m Op Cod 

■ l^n0RiE3nlca 

L*o«i 




VARIABLES 



FDe4 

00 

fl_FLAO 

d*tb 

OO 

FD03 

0000 

t40VED_BAS 

dBtiMi 

OOOO 

FDe7 

GOOD 

woueo^END 


DOOO 

FDBT 

OOGO 

BAS.LENO 

daf ^ 

GOOO 

FDfiS 

0000 

T_FILE 

d#f IN 

00 00 


Nqtaa 


|Aqqr*a* of aova4 BASIC 
land of nevad BASIC 
Ilangth of BASIC 
tcurrant polntar in Taset O 'A 

M lt« 


FGBD 

ED4aS30C rtOVE_BA31C 

Id be p tPROdJ 


FDf 1 

2A4B3C 

Id hip 1VARBI 


FB94 

EI342 

abc hlpbc 

1f 1 nd 1an^th of 


23 

Inc hi 

) BASIC prosi'Am 

FDT7 

23 

Inc hi 


FD« 

E3 

puatii hi 



Ci 

p np he 

iFrograa langth 

FDTA 

ED4307FB 

Id lfiAB_LENDIpbe 


FC7E 

ED3BBZ3C 

Id dap<RARtDPl 


F0A2 

EDS3B7FD 

Id tROVES^EN]}} pda 

land Df Nbvad 

FOAa 

2A4BBC 

Id hip <VAR$} 

1 BASIC 

FDAV 

EBBB 

Iddr iRava BASIC 


FDAB 

13 

Inc da 


FQAC 

ED33BSFI^ 

Id tROVEB.BASI . da 

latart of pou*d 


RAMTOP And KEU 

Symtaa 

BASIC 

FfiBO 

11DBFS 

Id dBpRQVEB.RSO 


FCiS3 

013AOG 

Id bCpOOSA 

laamaa^a lan9th 

FOBO 

CSDBZi 

cal) PJt.STRlMO 

iPrtnt Rdasa^a 

FDBT 

CDBGC2 WAIT 

call K_SCAH 

t Wa11 unt11 no 

FDDC 

71 

»d a.a 

ILay la pra*«a4 

FOBD 

FEFF 

Cp IFF 


FOBF 

20FO 

JP nXpUAIT 


FDCi 

7A 

Id Fpd 


Ft3C2 

FEFF 

CP FF 


FGC4 

20F3 

JP nXpUAIT 


FflCA 

COB002 HG.KET 

cal 1 K^ECAN 

I watt until a 

FDCO 

7B 

td apa 

Ikajr la praaaad 

FCCA 

FEFF 

Cp FF 


FDCC 

2SFa 

JF 1*N0_KEV 


FSCE 

llOGAF 

Id dapdFOD 

iNaw RANTOP 

FDBl 

ED33fi73C 

Id IRAHTDPlpda 


FOBS 

CDIDOD 

call NEU 

1Raaat Ranory 

FDD9 

1dOOOO HOVED.MSQ 

dafb jApOOpOO 

1 PRINT AT OpDl 

FDOB 

4Z4i^34F43ZO 

dafa 'BASIC * 


FBEl 

48417320 

dafa "had " 


FBES 

OZ63A34EZD 

dafa *baan " 


FDEA 

4D4F744S442EZQ 

dafa "aovad. " 


FOFl 

140200 

dafb idpOZpOO 

tPRlNT AT 2p0l 

rDF4 

303243333320 

dafa 'PRESS " 


F&FA 

414E3F20 

dafa «ANr " 


FDFC 

49433920 

dafa 'KEY • 


FE02 

344F20 

dafa 'TO " 


FEOS 

434043413ZZO 

dafa "CLEAR • 


FEOB 

40434B4F32392C 

dafa "REHORV." 



iPrDgraa to tranAlAita tha aovad BASIC tn 
iCall via PRINT USIt 6SOAZ 

taxt fll* 

FE12 

2AB23C BET^UF 

Id hi* CRAHTOPl 


FEX3 

zzesFD 

Id lT_FILE),hl 


FE18 

3ie4FD 

Id h]*BFLA0 

1 pro^raa fla^a 

FEiB 

3400 

td fhll.OO 

IGlaar fla^a 

FEiD 

ZABBFB BtART 

Id hiptMOVED_BAai 


FEZO 

34 LIMC^NO 

Id d, ini 1 


FEZl 

23 

Inc nt 


FEZ2 

3E 

Id a,(ht) 


FEZ 3 

Z3 

Inc hi 


FE24 

23 

Inc hi 

tmklp lan^th of 

FCZB 

23 

inc hi 

1 1 ina 

FE2A 

E3 

puqh hi 


FEZ7 

£3 

pqah hi 


FEZ« 

01 

pop be 


FEZO 

2AB7FB 

Id hi,IHQVED^ENbj 

ichach for and 

FE2C 

AF 

HOP a 

lof BASIC 

FE2D 

ED4Z 

dbc hip be 


FEZF 

DZAEFE 

Jp nCiNQT^QdNE 


FE3Z 

Ei 

pap hi 


FE33 

1174FE DONE 

Id dapSAVE.HSa 


FE3A 

013700 

Id bc,G0T7 

laaaaas# lan^th 

FE37 

CDDB21 

call PR.STRlHa 


FEIC 

2ABBFS 

Id hl,1T_FlLE) 


FE3F 

11O04F 

Id dapADSd 

iTaat fllB Start 

FE42 

ED32 

Abe hi pda 

Id pf bytaa In 

FE44 

2B 

dac hi 

Itaxt flla 

FE43 

111027 

Id dap2710 

1IDOOOd 

FE4a 

CD49FC 

call convert 

1 to daC1na1 

FE4B 

liE803 

td dap OSES 

1lOOOd 

FE4E 

CD49FE 

call convert 


FE51 

114400 

Id dapOOdd 

1 lOOd 

FES4 

CD49FE 

call CONVERT 


FE37 

i1GAOO 

Id dapOOPA 

1 iOd 

fesa 

COdTFE 

call CONVERT 


FE3D 

1lOlDO 

Id da,OOOl 


FE40 

CD49FE 

call CONVERT 


FEA3 

3EFD 

Id a*rtf 

IlDMar Bcraan 

FEfrS 

CB301Z 

cal 1 1230 

Ifor output 

FEAB 

C9 

ral 


FE6F 

AF CONVERT 

Kbp a 


FEdA 

3C COUNT 

t nc a 


ft At 

EG32 

afac h1p da 


FEAD 

3402 

jp C,PR„LENOTH 


FEAF 

1BF9 

Jr COUNT 


FE71 

19 PR^LENOTH 

add h1,d a 


FE7Z 

C42F 

add ap2F 

1 obtain CKRa coda 

FE74 

07 

rat iO 


FE73 

C9 

rat 


FE7A 

1400 BAVE.nSO 

dafb IdpOOpOO 

]PRINT AT OpDl 

FE7ft 

oo 

nop 


FE7F 

344F207341744320 

dafM "Td aai,# ■ 


FEBl 

424133494320 

dafM "BASIC * 


FEe7 

4173207443787420 

dafa "aa taxt " 


FESF 

44494C4S3A 

data "fllai" 


FET4 

ODOD 

dmih ODpOD rlina4»»4 * * " 

FEFA 

3341344320 

dm^rn. ^SAVE * 


FE4B 

224E4i4D432220 

dmfm 


FEA2 

434f444320 

dmfm 'CODE ^ 









FCA7 

FEAS 

FEAE 

FEAF 

FEHI 

FESA 

FEB7 

FEBA 

FEBB 

FECO 

FEC3 

FEC4 

FECA 

FECe 

FECA 

FECe 

FECE 
F EC F 
FEDO 
FEDt 
FED3 
F E D3 

FEPB 

FEDA 

FEDB 

FEQE 

FEBF 

FEEi 

FEE3 

FEE3 

FEE7 

FEES 

FEES 

FEES 

FECE 

FEFO 

FEF3: 

FEFA 

fefa 

FEES 

FEFA 

FEFS 

fefe 

FFOO 
FF03 
FF04 
FFOA 
FF07 
FFOB 
FFOC 
FFl 1 
FF13 

FFl 3 
FFlA 
FFiF 
FFIA 

ffid 

FFIF 

FFII 

FF23 

FF24 

FF2A 

FF2a 

FFZA 

FF2C 

FFZE 

FF30 

rF33 

FF33 

FF37 

FF3» 

FF3B 

FF3D 

FFAO 

FFA3 

FFA3 

FF47 

FFA9 

FFAB 

FF4D 

FF4F 

FF31 

FF33 

FF33 

FF37 

FF39 

FFSA 

FFSB 

FF3F 

FFA2 

FFfi3 

FFA3 

FFAB 

fFab 

FFftE 

FF71 

FF73 

FF76 

FF77 

FF7A 

FF7B 

FF7C 

FFBS 

FFa3 

FFBS 

FFa7 

FFft* 

FFac 

FFSS 

FFOF 

FFF2 

FFt3 

FF74 

FF73 

FFA7 

FFte 

FF7A 


323034313A2C 
03 

E8 N3T done 

1E20 

OlEBOZ 

COEAFF 

014400 

CSB6FF 

010 AOO 

CCB6FF 

7D 

FEZO 

2802 

£630 

C0C7FF STORE 

El BOOT 


200A 

F3 

3AB4F& 

EEOi 

32e4F8 

Fl 

FEOD ENTER 

2817 

FEOE 

200F 

El 

010300 

E&4A 


taoD 

FEZO NOT_SLUO 

3002 


18S7 

FE7B 

30ZA 

F3 

3AB4FD 

CSSF 


PRINTABLE 

ASOir 


Fl 

FEOD 

CC19FF 

FE3A 

CC17FF 

CBC7FF 

FEOa 

20 B a 

EL 


F3 UNREN 

3A84FD 

CBF7 

32B4FD 

Fl 

09 

FE80 NONASCII 

3010 

FE7C 



2808 

2184F0 

CB4A 


€834 

20BF 

DdlF 

CB77FF 

CD4EFF 

1S8B 

FEFO 

3004 


EXPAND 


BLOCK_QRAFH 


IBAS 

FEA3 ORAPHICB 

3004 

044F 

iaA3 

FEEA TOKENS 

200A 
FS 

3AS4F0 

CBD7 

3204FS 

Fl 

04AS NOT_REM 

CS77FF 

CSAEFF 

C3CSFF 

3A04FD TOKEN_FLAQ 

CSCF 

3204FD 

C9 

119400 TPKEn4_1 

F3 

CS7C07 PO_TAaUE 

340C 

3Aa4FS 

CB4F 

2009 

3e20 

CDASFF 

lA PO_EACH 

EA7F 

CSA3FF 

lA 

13 

07 

30F3 

D1 

FEAB 

2B03 


a4+w "20414,“ 

nop 

•K ri«,h] 

14 *,20 
14 bc,03Ee 
C4l1 OyT_SP_NO 
M 0C.0044 
call 0UT_SP_NO 
14 bC,OOOA 
call QUT_SP_WO 
Id m,I ” 

CP 20 

jr 1,STORE 
*44 A,30 
EBll STDRE_CHAR 
pop hi 
14 4,fhll 
1 n c h 1 
push hi 
Cp 22 

jr nx,ENTER 

puBh aT 
Id 4,fOFLAOI 
Her 01 

14 iOFLAOl.B 
pap Af 
Cp OD 
Jr X,ASCII 
Cp OE 

Jr nx,NOT_aLuO 

pop hi 
14 bep0003 
Adc hi I be 
push hi 
J r BODY 
cp 20 

iP hepPRINTABLE 
Jr aODT 
Cp 7B 

Jr PC p NONASC11 

pUAh At 
Id AtlOPLAai 
TAA 1r a 
Id fOFLAOlpA 
pop Af 

cp 00 

E^All ZpUNREN 
Cp 3A 

CAM ZpUNREH 
emll StORE.CHAR 
Cp OD 
Jr nZ|BODY 
pop hi 
Jp LlNE_NO 

puAh Af 
Id AptRFLAOl 

rAA 2tA 

Id IBFLAOlpA 
pop Af 
rat 
Cp BO 

jr nCpBLDCK.QRAPHC 
Cp 70 

J r z t EXPAND 
Cp 7E 

Jr Z,EXPAND 
Id hlpBFLAQ 
bit Op Chii 
Jr hZpASCii 
bit 2,Chi 1 
Jr nZpASCII 
Aub IF 

CaI] TOKENS.1 
e A11 T DKE N_FLAO 
Jr BODY 
Cp 90 

Jr nCpDftAPHICS 
Ld ApZO 
J r ASC11 
cp AS 

Jr nepTOKENS 
Aub 4F 
jr ASCII 
cp EA 

Jr nXpNOT.REM 
puAh At 

Id Ap fQFLAOl 
AAt, 2pA 

Id ffiFLAOr, A 
pap Af 

Auh AS 

call TOKENS.1 
call TOKEN.FLAG 
Jp BODY 
Id Ap(QFLAO) 

A*t IpA 

Id lOFLAOlpA 

rat 

Id d*pTO.TABLE 

pUAh Af 

CAll PO.SEARCH 
J r e t PD.EACH 
14 A,CaPLAOl 

bit ipA 

jr rllpPO.EACH 
Id ApZO 
call PO.,SAU£ 

Id Ap td«l 
And 7F 

CAll FO.SAVE 
14 ApCd.Al 
inc 4* 

Add ApA 

jr nCpPO.EACM 
pop 4m 
cp 48 

JF iiFO^TRSP 



FF9C 

FEEZ 


ep 02 


FF7E 

SE 


r»L c 

f convert 1 Ins 11 

FF7F 

7A 

PO.TBSP 

Id A.d 

1 t.a inAi 1 

FFAO 

FE05 


cp 03 

1lOOOd 

rrA2 



r»t C 


FFAS 

3EZ0 


Id ■,20 

1 lODd 

FFA3 

S3 

ro.savE 

bu«h d« 


FFAd 

Sf 



1 lOd 

ffa> 

CDCTFF 


GAM SrORE.CHAB 


ffaa 

DF 




FFAS 

Si 


pop da 


FFAC 

CF 


rat 


FFAD 

71 

OUT.SP.Z 

Id a. a 

(Obtain CKfta CDd# 

FFAE 

FEFF 


cp FF 


FFBO 

zooc 


Jr hLpPH.DIQlT 


FFS2 

3E00 


Id a,00 


FFSd 

teoA 


jr PH.OIOIT 


FFB6 

AF 

OUT SP KO 

Mor » 


FFS7 

EDflZ 

OUT.SP.l 

Fbc hl.be 

1 Quiotaa 

FFliT 

3C 


1 nc a 


FFBA 

30F1: 


Jr fiC,OUT^ap_i 


FFBC 

OF 


Add hi,be 


FFBS 

3D 


dae A 

t Tnggl# BuDtw* 

FFSE 

:zeED 


jr z,ouT_SP_2 

t-P 1 

FFCO 

FE70 

PR.PI0IT 

cp 20 


FFC2 

ZEOS 


J r z,STORE.CHAR 

V€HJEH 

FFC4 

CA30 


add A.30 


FFCA 

1 IFFOO 


id da.OOFF 

iMkambvr Vlug 

FFC7 

E3 

&TORE_€HAft 

tF 

pmah hi 


FFCA 

ZAEBFD 


Id hl,IT_FlLE( 

1SASIC Pointer 

FFCD 

77 


id ihiipA 

|«k|p floating 

FFCe 

Z3 


inc hi 

Ipslflt nunb#r 

FFCF 

SZBEFD 


id IT.FILElphi 


ffdz 

El 


pop hi 


FFG3 

CF 


rat 

ICOntrQl Cad«7 






note; 

Cad* from PF77 * FFCA 

h A a ba an b p r 


Hh 1 eh 

hand 1*4 

LLIST with n^Cmmmmry chEngaa 

VASeti? 






iR»AAt TokAn flag 


E n t mr 

t REH f]A9 


] If 
1 r 
Ilf I 

IrAAVt REM flA9 
lEhtarT 


IREN flAg 


(Block OraphlcA? 


I STICK? 


1 free 


IOu Q t AA f1 AS? 


I REM flag? 


1 Off AAt 


iUaaf grAphtcA? 


1 Sp 


lUmAr grAphlcA? 


iMAkA ASCII 


IREN 


ISal REN flag 


iSaL TokAn -riAg 


IbABA mddrA 

ITokAh TAbl 
If1nd Tekan 
1 Lab1a mnd 


A bf 

In 

Lota 


1 TDl<an f 1 Ag aat? 
IPrint apACA 
Ilf naadad 


ICAncAl Any 
11nvarLad bit 


I 1 f InvATtAd 
land Df TokAn 
I trail Ing i 


iPrlnt trAlling 


I 


IPrint linA N 

I AA daciAAl 


tSp 


lObtAln CHR« cod# 


frnm LhA RON 


Listing 2 

9000 CLEAR 64899: LET 
TORE : FOR 1-0 TO 73: READ d«: L 
ET «S*A« + d«: NE)(T I 
9010 IF LEN THEN PRINT 

FLASH lI'lT^ror In N«chln« Cads D 
ATA Lln#* 9923-9990"*'"Plea 

>« correct before continuing'': S 
TOP 

9020 LET eddress^64900: FOR t»l 
TO LEN »e-l STEP 2 

9030 POKE eddreasTlNT (C1-11/21, 
«COPE e*(l)-(4a AND CODE e«Ul<5 
PI-173 AND CODE a*1117641)^i64CO 
«Stl+il*f48 AND CODE aVIlFlX 
)-f57 AND CODE e«(l9i)>64) 

9040 NEXT 1 

9070 GLS ; PRINT "Medline Code h 
ee been Loeded Into memory."* 

a eny key to SAVE It VERIFT 
BASteZiext": PAUSE O: SAVE "BA 
SlC2text"C0DE 64900,392: CLS : P 
RtNT "Rewind end pley tepe to Ve 
Plfy": VERIFY "BASICZtext* CODE 6 
4900,792 

DATA "0000000000000000" 

DATA *001D4B53SC2A4B3C" 

9927 DATA "ED422323E3C1ED43" 

■ ■ .Continue this pettern 

ueing Lln* number* 9920-9997 
increment* of 1, • . 

9998 DATA "FD7723228BFDE1C9" 


* m 



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quire about Item »H04. The Price Is now reduced over 30% to $277.00!! It’s also availabe 
with Full Height Drives for Much Much LESS! CaH us up on our 24 HOUR 0 LINE for Ins¬ 
tant Information! Just another one of the IncrecJIble Quantum Computing Bargins we 
always make available to our Fellow QL Users & Admirers. Get our QL USER CATALOG for 
ALL of them! NOTE: FREEWARE with ALL 1st Purchases! Just Enclose A BLANK 
Mlcrodrive Cartridge. We will Return it to you FULL!!! ALL Disk Drive Orders will get the 


FREEWARE on a FREE Floppy Disk! Get 


Maps, Clocks, Machine Code 


Graphics Demo, File Master, etc.! Don’t Miss Out On This!! 


Order From: QUANTUM COMPUTING, Box 1280, Dover 

To CALL The Q Line Dial: (201) 328-6846 

You Must ACT NOW!!! 

It’s a Limited Intro Offer! 


I 


07801 



















Sharp’s Inc. 

Rt. 10, Box 459 
MechanicsvHIe, VA 23111 
(804) 746-1664 or 730-9697 

COMPARE OUR PRICES! 


QSOUND/QPRINT 

A sound generator board 
THE EDITOR 

$129.95 

$34.95 

METACOMCO: 

PASCAL 

$79.95 

10 times better tbao Quill 


BCPL 

$69.95 

512 K RAM 

$164.95 

APL 

$99.95 

DISKI/F 

$124.95 

LATTICE ‘C’ 

$99.95 

QFLASH 

$29.95 

LISP 

$69.95 

512K&DtSC l/F 

$289.95 

ASSEMBLER 

$45.95 

CENTRONICS t/F 

$34.95 

BOOKS: 

$8.95 EACH 

SUPERCHARGE 

$69.95 

MACHINE CODE PROG, 


AQUANAUT 471 

$25.95 

ODDS COMPANION 


THE KING 

$25.95 

QL GAMESMASTER 


CL PAINT 

$34.95 

INSIDE THE SINCLAIR QL 


SPRITE GENERATOR 

$24.95 

USING GRAPHICS ON THE QL 


QL MOUSE 

$129.95 

ADVANCED PROGRAMMING ON QL 

SUPER ASTROLOGER 

$29.95 

DATABASE MANAGMENT QL 


WAR IN THE EAST 

$27.95 

QLSUPERBASIC 


SUPER TOOLKIT II 

$54.95 

PROFITING FROM THE QL 

. 

QL PRINTER 

$219.00 

QL COMPUTING 


ROM DISASSEMBLER 

$34.95 

(MANY MORE TITLES) 


MICRODRIVES IN STOCK AT $9.95 FOR (4) 


& MASTERCARD ACCEPTED WITH 3% SURCHARGE. ALL PRICES INCLUDE SHIPPING. 

WRITE FOR OUR NEW 6th EDITION CATALOG. 



1 MODE 256? CLS?PAPBF 0:PAPER #6j0?lNK 7?CLS #0;PRrRT" SI UCLAIR QL” 

2 AT 3,0? PRINT ”-------; PRINT; PRINT: PRINT" THIS 


IS AN ETCH-A-SKHTCH" 

3 PRIST" PROGRAM CREATED FOR THE STRANGE” 

4 PRINT” AND DEMENTED: POSSIBLY FOR THOSE" 
n PRINT" VE BELIEVE THAT THIS PROGRAM ” 

12 PRINT" WILL PROVIDE MINUTES OF ENJOY-" 

13 PRINT" 2CENT, SECONDS OF ECETACY, AND A" 

14 PRINT" BETTER OUTLOOK ON LIFE, THE UNI-" 

15 PRINT" VERSE, AND EVERYTHING," 

16 PRINT" < TV MODE >":PR I NT:PR I NT 

17 FOR K=1 TO 35 

IS PRINT I 

19 NEXT K 

20 PAUSE 100 


Q I— 

EH T O H ES 

By David and Robert Johnson 



22 PRINf'DO YOU VISH TO SEE THE DIRECTIONS";,"CY/N>" 

23 IF DI*-"N" THEN GO TO 40 

24 CLS:CLS #0;PRINT" DIRECTIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS?" 

25 PRINT:PRINT;PR1 NT" USE?" 

26 PRINT?PRINT "0-FOR UP" 

27 PRINT:PRINT "L-FOR DOWN" 

26 PR I NT;PRINT "P-FOR RIGHT" 

29 PRINT?PRINT "O-FOR LEFT" 

30 PRINT:PRINT "Q“FOR DRAWING COMMANDS" 

35 PRINT:PRINT "T-FOR TEXT COMMANDS" 

45 PAUSE 300: CLS:CLS #0 

42 PRINT "TO BEGIN" 

43 PRINT;PRINT"1> DRAWING" 

44 PR I NT;PR I NT"2> SEE A PICTURE" 

45 PRINT:PR I NT"PRESS 1 OR 2";INPUT YESS 

46 IF YES*-"1" THEN GO TO 349 

47 IF YES5="2" THEN GO TO 160 
46 GO TO 40 

120 IF E1="Y" THEN GO TO 160 
130 IF ES^"N" THEN CO TO 322 

140 GO TO 110 

150 LET m = CHRACg3>;LET L» = CHRSC93) 

160 PRINT DS;"OPEN POINTSl" 

170 PRINT Dt;"READ POINTSl" 

180 LBYTES ludvl^POlNTSl, 131072 

210 PRINT D»:"CLOSE POINTSl" 

211 PAUSE 100 

349 CLS;MODE 512 

350 PAPER #0;7iINK #0i0:CLS #0? PRINT #0;"0=UP* 
L^DN, 0=4-, P^9, Q=STOP FOR COMMANDS" 


INPUT DI* 



370 LET Y=1 

390 LET X=Y 

395 LET YS=1NKEY1 

400 IF YS="" THEN GO TO 395 

420 IF Y6="0" THEN LET Y*Y>1 

425 IF YS="L" THEN LET Y=Y-1 

430 IF Y1="0" THEN LET X=X-1 

435 IF Y»="P" THEN LET X=X+1 

436 IF YS="Q" THEN GO TO 560 

437 IF YS="T" THEN TEXT 

520 POINT X,Y 

521 PRINT #0;"X“";Xs" Y="; Y 

522 INK 7 
550 GO TO 395 

560 CLS #0:PRINT #0:"DO YOU WISH TO PLACE A CIRCLE 
AT X"jXj"Y"jYj" ? CY.N>":INPUT #0i CS 


Program Continued On Page 36 


34 
























A" 

Compu ler 
Re^ponS€ 


AuUiurLtcd 

DcmWt 


MARKEL ENTERPRISES 

Post Office Box 2392 
Secaucus, New Jersy 07094-0992 

(718) 627-1293 

Serving the Sinciair community since 1982! 








I.C.E. Cartridge...$20.00 when bought with QL 

Reduced prices on many items in our Cataiog. 

WRITE! 

A FEW STILL AVAILABLE 


Sinclair QL Vision RGB Color Monitor.$299.95 


MARKEL ENTERPRISES WISHES TIME DESIGNS MAGAZINE A 

HAPPY 2nd BIRTHDAY! 


MORE ITEMS BEING ADDED DAILY AS WE EXPAND OUR QL SUPPORT. 

IF IT’S NOT LISTED - WE CAN GET IT - PLEASE CALL OR WRITE. 

ADD $3.00 FOR C.O.D. SHIPMENTS 
ADD 3% FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. 

NY AND NJ RESIDENTS ADD APPROPRIATE SALES TAX. 


Our address says mail order / Our phone says NYC / Our name says support 










555 IF CS="Y" THEN GO TO 57® Program Continued From Page 34 

566 IF C$“*VN" THEN GO TO 600 

570 PRINT #0;«CIRCLE PARAKETEHS: RADIUS, ECCENTRICITY, ANGLE";INPUT Z,V,V 

575 CIRCLE X;Y;Z,V,V:PR I NT #0;"DO YOU WISH TO FILL 7 CY/N>" 

576 INPUT #0jCS;lF C$-"Y” THEN PAINT 

577 IF C1='*N" THEN GO TO 395 

600 PRINT #0: PRINT #0;**DO YOU WISH TO CHANGE X * Y 7 <Y/N)" TO USE THIS PROGRAM*** 

601 INPUT #0i CS:IF C*="Y" THEN GO TO 610 

602 IF CS-"N" THEN GO TO 395 

610 PRINT #0; "YOU ARE NOV AT X” j Xi" Y" j Yj ** INPUT NEV X": INPUT #0^ X 

611 PRINT #0;*'!rEV Y 77": INPUT #0r Y:GO TO 395 
13000 DEFlne PROCedure PAINT 

13010 PRINT #0;" WHAT COLOR ? < 0 - 7 >":INPUT #0^COLOR 
13015 INK COLOR:FILL 1:CIRCLE X;YjZ,W.V:FILL 0 
13020 END DEFlne 

13999 REMark 

14000 REHark BY David Johnson and Robert Johnson 
14500 REKark for the Sinclair QL : 1966 

14510 RENark »»»YYY*#»*»*^*at*T*:**#*****t**t*^»t^^< 

15000 DEFlne PROCedure TEXT 

15010 PRINT #0;**TEXT AT CURRENT X ";Xj**Y "iY;" POSITION 77 CY/N>" 

15015 INPUT #0:TEXS:IF TEX*-"Y” THEN GO TO 15017 

15016 IF TEX*-"N" THEN GO TO 600 

15017 PRINT #0|**INK ? (0'-7>": INPUT #0iCOLOR;INK COLOR 

15030 PRINT #0j"INPUT YOUR TEXT: INPUT #0:TE$ 

15035 CURSOR X.Y:PRINT TEl 

15040 end DEFlne 


This is a drawing program for the QL^ and is 
self-explanatory—with directions in the pro¬ 
gram itself- You can view the program on a TV 
(F2) or a monitor on F2- The most important 
thing is to have your CAPS LOCK OW! Just 
follow the programs built in procrpts- 


Anyone who wants a copy of this program on 
Microdrive, just send a formatted cartridge 
to: D- Johnson, 2399 St- Rd- 95, Edison, OH 
43320, Include $1,00 for shipping. 




By Bob Howard, WA6DLI 


As soon as you read the title, you will say*."He 
did WHAT'\ Yes, its true,,,like the early Sinclairs, you 
can now buy a QL Kit by mail order from A+ COMPUTER 
RESPONSE in Keene, Mew Hampshire (and some QL dealers 
also have them now). 

Well, as I am prinnarily a 2068 buff,-,I ordered one 
as a way to dabble in the QL without a major investment. 
The kit price is $139 plus $7 shipping from A+* 1 
ordered the QL kit on September 25, and it arrived 
October 8th, 

But you say,,, isn't this a dirty trick-*,selling 
the QL by mail as a $139 kit when they are also ex¬ 
pecting the 17 or so QL dealers to sell the assembled 
QL package at $299 list less what the dealers want to 
throw in as discounts or added software and accessories? 
I think not as you have to consider what you DON'T get 
with the kit. First you will be in the true Atari ST or 
Amiga "class" as your computer kit comes with absolutely 
NO SOFTWARE! This is more of a problem than you think, 
as you can't run to your local downtown store and buy 
some- Also while you can buy commercial software from 
the QL dealers,,.they don't offer the four bundled pro¬ 
grams that come with the dealer-sold QL (word processor, 
data base, spread sheet, and graph programs). Since you 
didn't get the programs,,-you don't get the standard QL 
documentation either, (The QL kit only comes with parts 
of the User Guide, and there is no nice binder either- 
Most of the documentation concerns technical aspects of 
theQL,) The kit sales might hurt dealer sales of 
complete QL packages, but you could look at it as an 
expanded market for the dealers sale of peripherals and 
software- 

If you don't need the business package,,.then the 
QL kit is a great '’deal”, for learning SuperBASIC and 
for typing in programs from tutorials such as in ZX 
Computing Monthly from England and also TDM- 

Well enough said on the ethics of the deal,,,what 
is the QL kit like and how hard is it to build? First of 
all, a kit it is not,,.it is a knocked down QL out of 
the case and consists of: a case with keyboard in the 
top half, two micro-drives, a heat sink, and a single 
mother-board computer, assembled and apparently tested 
by A+ (derived from the stickers on the bottom of the 
case,) Also a bag of screws and miscellaneous parts like 
covers for the ports not used. The heavy power supply 
and cord, and TV switch box and lead is also packed in 


the box* Also supplied are two blank micro cartridges, 
and two cables: an RGB cable and a serial port cable- 
(Note: these last two items are not included with pre- 
assetnbled QL's and are an option,] 

The "Kit" is about as difficult to assemble as the 
average lawn chair or knocked down hardware you might 
get at a department store. This doesn't mean there are 
not pitfalls (you might be a klutz at reading the dir¬ 
ections!), The QL Kit comes with the following docu¬ 
mentation: An assembly manual produced by A+ Computer 
Response, A Beginners Guide to the QL by Sinclair, A 
Technical Description of the QL by Sinclair, It is all 
well packaged and the instructions are very good as far 
as they go. They look like they might have been produced 
with a QL graphics program, 

I had the thing together in no time at all---but I 
am an old hand at stuffing the Sinclair keyboard ribbons 
into those slots! This is the most difficult part, along 
with not dislodging it all when you are plugging the LED 
wires into their sockets- These wires and the keyboard 
ribbons are both ccxning from the top lid of the case and 
you must do a balancing act to hold the lid at a 45 
degree angle while you push the wires into sockets- One 
slip and you risk ruining the ribbons or may crumple the 
ribbons while fighting to get the LED wires into their 
holes and held in until you push down on the socket to 
lock the wires in place. 

The wires for the two Hicrodrives can only go in 
the right way if you don't twist them and you have the 
drives in the right position as shown in the drawings. 



36 











My big trauma came when everything worked fine 
(keyboard all keys, LED lights, and drives}.but 1 
couldn't pass the formatting test. Then I read the QL 
Beginners Guide and found that the formatting command: 
FORMAT MDV1_^ shown in the assembly manual must include 
the underline syiribol as part of the comnand (or you get 
the dreaded "not found" report). I thought the " " was 
just their way of indicating the following flashing 
cursor! So my microdrives were OK but my conmand was in— 
conplete. This needs to be stated in the assembly manual 
I think...at least it cost me a lot of grief. Oh yes, 
the TV switch box and cable allowed me to test the QL 
on a convenient TV set nearby, 

A+ Coirputer Response does offer a phone consul¬ 
tation service for kit problems from 3 to 5 pm Eastern 
time. I am sure this is for kit assembly and test pro¬ 
cedures only...they will not be willing to hold your 
hand on how to use SuperBASIC and otherwise program your 
QL*..and your phone bill couldn't stand this either. 

When you move from that TV set, you are going to 
find that Sinclair expected you to purchase the Sinclair 
RGB Monitor. You won't be able to use the QL's monitor 
mode on most TV's, but you could on a green or amber hi¬ 
res monitor if you know how to connect one up. The QL's 


RGB plug (an 8-pin DIN plug) is a rare bird to buy..-its 
not at Radio Shack. I happen to have color monitors in 
my coiputer room/ham shack and one is a TI composite and 
the other is a Comrex CR-6600 RGB. Fortunately, I had 
been through the RGB cable/plug mess in getting my 2068 
onto the RGB monitor. 

What is my verdict on the kit? I feel that if you 
want a "bargain" in a "super computer" (with the under¬ 
standing of the hassels you will have to go through to 
hook it up to bargain monitors, ect.), then the QL Kit 
is a good deal, especially if you want to program in 
SuperBASIC or other languages. If you want to use ICE (a 
GEM like desk top format operating system) and the 
bundled business software, you would be ahead to buy an 
assembled QL from an authorized dealer. You will be 
buying other software and peripherals from them anyway, 
so you might as well get off to a good start by getting 
the computer from them too. 

How do I like my QL? Well, it is great, and I have 
had fun trying some of the QL programs in ZX Computing. 
Now...if I just could get color on one of my monitors! 

For further information on the QL Kit, contact A+ 
Conputer Response, 69-B Island St., Keene, NH 03431 
(603-357-1800), 



nike de Sosa 


QL Word Processor AKA QLWP AKA Quill—the least 
acclaimed of the four Psion software programs bundled 
with the Sinclair QL—is still a good word processor, 
especially with added memory and RAMdisk. Quill's chief 
fault is that it is a bit slow in carrying out some 
operations. Quill's chief virtue is its ease of use: it 
is even simpler than Tasword II for the TS 2068- So much 
for criticism, now for some tips. 

In this and future articles on Quill, I will first 
deal with rather elementary things which it is essential 
for any user of Quill to master and then with more 
complex matters. 

If you have not already done so, clone a working 
copy of Quill from the master Quill cartridge- 

Put a blank or no longer needed Microdrive cart¬ 
ridge in Microdrive 1. If it is a new cartridge, format 
it five times using; 

FDR F*=l TO 5! FORMAT MDVl_ 

Otherwise, put your master Quill program cartridge in 
Microdrive 2, then key and enter: 

LRUN MDV2_CL0NE_BAS 

This will take about ten minutes. When complete, return 
your Quill master program to its protective case and 
store it in a safe place, load a formatted file cart¬ 
ridge in Microdrive 2, then key and enter: 

LRUN MDV1_B00T 

Quill should load in under 20 seconds. You are now ready 
to write! (To load and run Quill from boot_up, just in¬ 
sert a Qull program cartridge in Microdrive 1 and key 
FI.) ^ 

Quill like most software programs has preset (or 
default) values for line spacing, margins, tab settings, 
ect., so you may, if you wish, proceed immediately. (To 
set or check i.hat values are set you will have to use 
various commands.) If you are not impatient to begin the 
great American novel, hold off a few minutes, and let's 
check out your Quill monitor screen. 

At the top Is the control area where pronpts and 
reminders are shown and where additional instructions 


will appear from time to time. For HELP it says to press 
FI. Try it. Once in the HELP facility, key FI again for 
instructions on how to use the facility. Key ESC to re¬ 
turn to the program. 

Keying F2 "toggles" the control area on and off, 
creating a larger working area (you can usually infer 
what's going on without the control area visible by re¬ 
ferring to the status area—the three lines below the 
working area,) 

Reading to the right in the control area is a block 
indicating that you can move the red cursor using the 
cursor (arrow) keys* (You cannot move the cursor on a 
blank screen or beyond the end of the text for the first 
time using the cursor keys; if you wish to leave a space 
at the top of the working area or later between para¬ 
graphs, you must use the ENTER key which starts a new 
indented paragraph or the SPACE bar or TABULATE key. 
Using ENTER to do this has the disadvantage of creating 
a new paragraph each time it is keyed which will slow 
your later movement through the text using the SHIFT and 
up and down cursor keys.) 

With text on the screen, keying the up and down 
cursor keys moves the cursor up or down one line: keying 
the left and right cursor keys moves the cursor one 
character space left or right. Depressing the SHIFT key 
while keying the up and down cursor keys moves the 
cursor up or down one paragraph at a time. Depressing 
the SHIFT key while keying the right and left cursor 

keys moves the cursor right or left a word at a time. 

Type in a paragraph of four or five lines: DO NOT 
USE THE ENTER KEY TO CHANGE LINES—just keep on typing 
without regard to where you are on a line and don't 
atteiipt to separate words at the end of a line or 
correct any errors- Quill will change lines for you. Now 
key ENTER to begin a new indented paragraph. Type a two 
or three line paragraph, then key ENTER again to begin a 
third indented paragraph. Practice moving the cursor 
right and left and up and down using the cursor keys and 
SHIFT plus the cursor keys* Do not worry that you cannot 
always place the cursor precisely where you wish: this 
is an unfortunate quirk of Quill! Check "Cursor" in the 
HELP facility. 


The wide central window in the control area displays 
the information shown upon loading Quill, two sets of 
conmands when F3 is keyed, and screen prompts during 
command sequences. The top line of the center window in¬ 
dicates you are in the Insert mode wherein characters 
keyed appear at the cursor position, displacing any 
existing text to the right^-note that if more than one 
word is inserted the text will separate to permit a 
longer section of text to be inserted. Contrary to what 
it says in you QL User Guide (QLUG)/ the text will not 
rejoin itself automatically. To rejoin the text, place 
the cursor one space past the final character at the 

front of the separation and press CTRL and the right 
cursor key. 

The bottom line in the central window of the con¬ 
trol area advises how to change to the Overwrite mode, 
the other Quill mode, by depressing SHIFT and keying F4. 
In the Overwrite mode, which you will find is much 
slower than the Insert mode, you can type over existing 
tex. Use of the Overwrite mode, which I tend to forget 
is available, is frequently quicker and more useful way 
to edit text. Note that the current Quill mode is in¬ 
dicated in the status area. Check "'Insert*' in the HELP 
facility. 

The second item in the central window of the con¬ 
trol area reminds you to key ENTER to begin a new in¬ 
dented paragraph. Check "ENTER key" in HELP. 

The third line indicates that to delete text, you 
depress CTRL and a cursor key, CTRL and the left cursor 
key delete the character to the left of the cursor. CTRL 
and the right cursor key delete the character under the 
cursor; CTRL and the cursor key delete all text on the 
line to the left of the cursor; CTRL and the right 
cursor key delete all text on the line under and to the 
right of the cursor. Depressing the SHIFT and CTRL keys 
and the left cursor key deletes the word to the left of 
the cursor; SHIFT, CTRL, and the right cursor key de¬ 
lete the word to right of the cursor. Check "Delete" in 
HELP. 

The window to the right of the central window in 
the control area reminds you to key F4 to select another 
of Quill's other four typefaces (bold, underlined, high 
[superscript], and low [subscript]. Combinations are 
possible, for example, bold, underlined, high script. 
Another option is made available by keying F4—the Paint 
option with which the typeface of existing text may be 
changed; again, combinations are possible. Key F4 and 
follow screen prompts to add bold and underlined text, 
superscripts, and subscripts to your practice para¬ 
graphs. Use the Paint option to change the typeface of 
existing text. Check "Typeface" in HELP. 

The upper right window in the control area proirpts 
you to key F3 to select and toggle between two sets of 
Quill commands. 

In Quill, unlike Archive, the command to be sel¬ 
ected must appear in the central window of the control 
area. Once a comnand sequence is selected, subsequent 
prompts and instructions will appear in this window. A 
command is selected by keying the first letter of the 
cormiand. Key F3, then Key F3 again, noting the commands 
available. When the comnand Justify is displayed. Key J, 
Use the up cursor key to move the cursor to the be¬ 
ginning of the second paragraph. Press the SPACE bar and 
note that the justification of the text in the second 
two paragraphs is changed. Note also that text cannot be 
added while in a comriand sequence. Key ENTER to return 
to the normal (Insert or Overwrite mode.) It is not a 
good idea to use ESC to terminate a command sequence; in 
some cases this might cancel a desired command change. 

ESC is used to abort a command sequence in progress 
or to perform some designated function within a command 
sequence. 

The working area consists of 17 lines of text with 
the control area present or 21 lines without the control 
area. 


The status area consists of the three lines at the 
bottom of the screen* The uppermost of these is the in¬ 
put line editor on which the cursor, command sequence in 
use, and prompts sometimes appear, and on which entries 
(filenames, ect.) are made. The cursor will appear on 
this line when an input is required. The Quill mode, 
typeface, number of words typed, document name, and the 
page and line number of the cursor line are displayed on 
the bottom two lines in the status area. 

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE all of these pro¬ 
cedures now or you may develop ingrained bad habits 
which will slow you down later I 

So far, this article has dealt with elementary but 
essential procedures that must be mastered. For the 

novice, don't wait for the next issue of TDM to continue 
learning Quill. Make use of the Quill section of the 
QLUG, and the HELP facility to teach yourself to use the 
program. Make sure you fully understand each conmand 
sequence as you proceed* If you are using the basic 128k 
QL, I advise you to SAVE your document every twenty or 
thirty minutes on two Microdrive cartridges and begin a 
new document file when the document can no longer be 
stored in RAM, that is, when Microdrive 2 begins to 
operate during text insertion. Leave at least 30 sectors 
free on your file cartridge when creating longer docu¬ 
ments. Next time out I will assume that you have pro¬ 
gressed to "the more experienced Quill user" status. 

Tips For the More Experienced Qui11 User 

Once your program is configured using CONFIG_BAS 
and your printer data is installed using INSTALL_BAS, 
delete these programs and INSTALL_DAT from your Quill 
working copy to make room for auxiliary SuperBASIC and 
machine code programs relevant to word processing. On an 
unexpanded QL, it is a toss-up wether you should add 
machine code programs to multitask with Quill; it may be 
t>®tter to save most of the unused RAM for document 
files. But you can expand your BOOT file to include many 
auxiliary procedures and functions without reducing the 
available RAM for document files significantly. 

On my 640k QL, I multitask four programs with 
Quill; QDTG, a date-time^roup program which appears in 
the status area, based on a program appearing in QUANTA 
and three proprietary programs, GAPS, QUILL_KErY and 
MINI_J2ALC. My BOOT program proper consists of about 46 
lines and uses QL TOOLKIT II commands. The bulk of the 
BOOT program consists of about 25 defined procedures and 
functions. With Quill loaded in RAMdisk, I can quickly 
QUIT Quill, perform any necessary tasks-nnost frequently 

saving my current document file to Microdrives—and 
return to Quill in a flash. 

Listing 1 is my Quill BOOT program. It can be 
easily modified to suit your needs and equipment mainly 
by deleting lines. Listing 2 is a machine-code program 
loader for a program, QtoRAMl, which transfers Quill 
from Microdrive 1 to RAMdisk 1, making necessary pro¬ 
visions for efficient RAM management. Listing 3 is the 
QDTG program loader. 

Most of the defined procedures and functions in 
Listing 1 are, I trust, self-explanatory. If you can't 
figure something out, drop me a line, in care of TDM and 
include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. 

[If you would like me to send you my Quill BOOT 
program on Microdrive, including non-proprietary machine 
code programs; the programs in listings 2 and 3: four 

PRINTER_DAT programs; and a few useful SuperBASIC pro¬ 
grams of my own devising, you may order it through TIME 
DESIGNS for $15. Send check/money order to: TDM, 29722 

Hult Rd. Colton, OR 97017. VISA and MASTERCARD charges 
accepted”telephone orders O.K. Please specify "Mike's 
Quill Cartridge" when ordering,] 

NEXT MONTH: More on Quill, particularly on in¬ 
creasing the number of Quill typefaces readily available 
i^o you. 


38 




E FORdAI rnmE^EOOi SBYTES ramE^spaca,13107^ 
,80000 

•i CLEAR: WlNDOy S1E,E56,0,0; CSIZE 1,1: CLS 
6 PRINT ■* rami - 
B FORriAT raml_E^O 
10 PRINT ” ramS - 
IE FOSnfiT ram5_3BO 

I'i PRINT * Sotting up QUILL on RAndisk" 

IB copy itidV1 _qu 11 _hab TO roml^quil_hDb 
18 COPY mdvl_compttro_oxo TO roml_comparo_ox 

o 

20 COPY mdvl_301tieodE_doc TO rom5_aalheQ[lE_ 
doc 

22 COPY mdvl_lheod_dDC TO ram5_lhBad_doc 
24 COPY fiidvl jocadjdoc TO ramS_acad_doc 
£6 copy mdvl^fastcopu TO rBinl_fastcopy 
E8 PRINT: PRINT ^ Do you ulsh to sat Clock 
Cy/N)T 

30 IF lNKEYSC-l>--'*y-: PRINT : PRINT ^ 5DATE 
yyyy, mm, dd,hh,mm,S3“\\** Key and ENTER *C' 
to continuo’’: STOP 

3E CLS: PRINT Executing multi tasked proyr 
ams" 

34 EXEC mdvl_qulll_kBy 
3G EXEC mdvl_mini_calc 
38 EXEC mdvl_caps 
40 EXEC ffldvl_qdta 

4E CLS: PRINT ” Transferring Quill to RAni_ 

H 


44 

46 



50 



54 

56 

SB 

60 



U 



it 


m 


mdvl^qtoraml 

*■ Select Printer Driver" 

1 - Std STAR SO-10“ 
a “ Std STAR Delta 10“ 

3 - Std EPSON FXBO Compatibles 

4 - Book danuacrlpt'* 

Your choice? ";pr 

pr 



64 


PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
INPUT 
SELect 

"1: COPY mdvi_printerl_dat TO raml_print 
dat 

■E: COPY fndvl_prlntBrE_dat TO ranil_print 
dat 

“3: COPY mdvi_prlnter3_dat TO raml_j3rint 
dat 



6B "4: COPY mdvl_prlntBr4_dat TO raml^print 
er_dat 

68 END SELect 

70 CLS; PRINT " Copy fIDUE files to RAI15” 

7E liTCOPy mdvE_,ram5_ 

74 PRINT "noro? IF INKEYSC-1J—"y": 00 T 
0 7S 


76 FORnAT ramS_ 

70 PRINT " Executing QUILL" 

60 CLOSE #1: CLOSE ttEi MINOOU #0,400,EO,35, 

BE £XEC_W raml_quill 
84 OPEN #l,CDn: OPEN US,con 

0B uiscr 

00 CSIZE 1,1; PRINT ” Copy ramS^ document f 
lies to mdvE_" 

80 WCDPY rain5_,mdvE_ 

SB CLS; DIR mdvE_; PAUSE 150 
34 PRINT: PRINT ** Key end enter ’ret' to re 
boot QUILL"VV“ or 'Irab* to load mare doc 
umente end reboot DUILL"\\** or *cop 1* / 
*cop 2' to backup files on mdvl or mdvE_" 
SB STOP 

SCOO REHark PROCEDURES & FUNCTIONS 
BODE DEFina PROCedure C 
9004 CONTINUE 
9006 ENO DEFine 

8000 DEFine FuNction SGNCn): IF n-0: RETurn 
O; ELSE RETurn n/AB5Cnl 
9010 DEFine FuNction FECCfl: RETurn Cf-3E>* 

9012 DEFine FuNction CEFCCl: RETurn C*9/5+3 
E 

9014 DEFine FuNction HIO: RETurn RNDCl TO 1 
03 

8016 DEFine FuNction RlOO: RETurn RNDCl TO 
1003 

9010 DEFine FuNction DICE; LOCal a,b; a-RND 
(1 TO 6); b'RNDCl TO 6): RETurn a+b 
9020 DEFine PROCedure LISX1154 
90EE LOCal a,b,n$ 

8DE4 CLS #a 

90E6 INPUT “ Program name? "^nS 

90E8 INPUT " Enter program start line “;a 

0030 INPUT " Enter program end line ";b 

9032 OPEN tt3,serl 

9033 PRINT tt3,CHRSCE73;CHRSC023iCHRSC63 

9034 PRINT #3,CHRStE7>;CHRSC77)iCHRSC113 

9036 PRINT It3, CHRSCE73 i CHRSC013 i CHRS1543 

9037 PRINT #3.CHRSCE73iCHRSC703iCHRS(6> 

9030 PRINT •l3,CHR5a4 3inS: PRINT #3 

9040 PRINT t3,CHRSCS73jCHRSC6B3jCHR»C4) 

904E LIST #3, a TO b 

9044 PRINT #3,CHR*CE73jCMRSC6B)jCHRSC53 

8048 PRINT #3,CHR1C1E3 

9049 CLOSE #3 

9050 END DEFine 

305E DEFine PROCedure utscr 

9054 yiNDOUl #0,500,40,4,216; yiNDDU 508, E 

16,4,0: yiNDOy #2,500,216,4,0 

SOSS PAPER 0: INK 7: PAPER #2,0; INK #2,4 

9058 nODE 4 

9060 CLS #0: CLS: CLS #E 

9062 ENO DEFine 

9064 DEFine PROCedure DSCR2 

9066 UlNDOy#0,480,96,16,200: UlNDOy#!,100 
,200,320,0: UINDOyttE,295, 200,16,0 


Now Available! 


THE 


Over 60 pages of program listings, reviews, hard¬ 
ware projects, hints and tips, and articles Covers 
TS-1000. TS-2068, and QL All are reprints from 
the last year of SUM plus a few that didn’t make it 
into print before now. 

Articles include Building an EPROM Program¬ 
mer, Sprites on the 2068, Adding RGB to 2068, QL 
Word Processing, What’s Available for TS-1000. 
and much more. Does overlap the “Special Issues’* 
advertised to the right. 

*6.95 postpaid 

F 00 TE\^ SQFTUJPRE P.O.Box 14655 


SUM 


PART 


The original “THE BEST OF SUM’* is now in its 
printing. 112 pages of articles going all the 


way back to the beginning of SUM 


3 years 


M1.95 postpaid 


QL Special Issue (12/65) — *3.95 postpaid. 
TS-1000 Special Issue (5/86) — *3.95 postpaid 


Everything! *20.00 postpaid 


Gainesville, FL 32604 904/462-1086 (6 pm • 9 pm EDT) 


39 









9OB0 PAPERtt0,0: INKftO,?: CLSttO: PAPER 0: 

INK 1% CLSi PAPER*t2,0: INK#2,7: CLStE 

9070 nODE 4 

9072 END DEFine 

9074 DEFlno PROCodure OSCR 

9076 y INDDU t □, 400.56,16,200 : Ml I NDOUtt 1,480 

,200.16,0; yiNDQMItt2,4e0,200,16,0 
907B PAPER#0,0; INK#0,7 j CLS#0: PAPER 0: 
INK 7; CLS: PAPERME.O; lNK«»2,7i CLStE 

9000 nODE 4 

9002 END DEFing 

9064 DEFine PROCedure liatdir 

9006 CLS: OPEN #3,sari 

9086 OPEN^NEMJ #4, ramS^riFE 

9090 PRINT #9,CHRSC27)&"R”fiCHRSClO) 

9032 PRINT i3,CHRSC27)a‘*N*’flCHR$CB3 

9094 PRINT #4.CHR5C27}a"N"8CHRSC6) 

9036 PRINT #3,CHRSCe7Da"n"&CHRSC10) 

9090 PRINT #4,CHRSC2738^n”aCHRSC10) 

9100 INPUT "MDU Number? ";kS 

9102 PRINT ”q to quit” 

9104 INPUT ”nDM Name? "jFS 

3106 IF FS—"q" THEN GO TO 3122 

9108 PRINT #3.CHRSC27)fi"£" 

9110 PRINT #3,CHRSC143;f®: PRINT #3 

9112 PRINT 1t4,CHHSC14>ifS; PRINT #4 

9114 DIR tt3,"m£jv” a kS & 

9116 DIR #4, ”mdv" S kS 8 

9119 PRINT i3 

9120 PRINT #4: GO TO 9104 

9122 CLOSE #3 

3124 CLOSE It4 

9126 END DEFine 


9126 DEFine PROCedura rob 
9130 GO TO 90 
9132 END DEFine 
9134 DEFine PRQCeduro LRE6 

9136 CLS: PRINT ^Select nQU2 daruments to 
RAHS" 



WCDPY indv2_,ratnS_ 
9140 PRINT "flore? 

GO TO 913B 
9142 GO ID 00 
9144 END DEFine 


IF lNKEYSC-1) 



914G DEFine PROCedure cz 

9140 CLStia 

9150 END DEFine 

9152 DEFine PROCedure UAL 

9154 Local y,fS 

9156 FORMAT ram0_lO 

9150 CLS; PRINT "Input formulae? Cz to 
end?” 

9160 CLEAR 

9162 INPUT fSi 

9164 IF fS—"z"; END DEFine 

9166 DPEN^NEW #4, rein0_work 

9160 PRINT #4,"9174 y “ 

9170 CLOSE m 

3172 MERGE ram0_uork 

9174 REnark uiorking space 

9176 DELETE ram0_work 

9170 PRINT " - "jy 

9160 GO TO 9160 

9162 END DEFine 

9104 DEFine PROCedure CDPCn) 

9106 WCOPY ramS_,"rndv^Sna"^" 

9100 DIR "»ndv"ana"_" 

9190 END DEFine 

9192 DEFine FuNction root Cnumber,root!: RE 
Turn number‘Cl/root1 

9194 DEFine FuNctlon factCn>; IF n**!; RETur 
n 1: ELSE RETurn n*FactCn-l> 

9196 DEFine PROCedure sample 
9190 Local ane% 

9200 CLS 

9202 INPUT "Percent pro or For candidate 
A? "ja 

9204 b-lOO-ai PRINT 

9206 INPUT "Size oF sample? "jn 

9200 Bn35£"1.36*S0RTCa*b/n) 

S210 PRINT 

9212 PRINT "SampIinQ error is plus or min 
us "jans^i” percent Cat 95V conFidence leve 
1>"N\ 

9214 PRINT "Range pro or for candidate A 
“ B-ansV;" to a+ansV;" percent"W 
9216 PRINT "Range con or For candidate 0 
- “j b-ansV;" to b+ansVj" porcont"\\ 
9210 PRINT "NOTE: Non-sampling errors may 
exceed the sampling error I"\\ 


9220 PRINT "Expand ranges plus/minue 2-4V 
for greater confidence factor." 

3222 END DEFine 

9224 DEFine PROCedure 0L2 

9226 wide-e54 

9220 yiNDOU 250,206,254,0; UINDDU lt2,Udlde 

,206,2,0: WINDOW #0,2*iiilde, SO, 254-uido, EOB 

3230 PAPER 0: INK 4; BORDER 1,7,0,3: PAPE 

R «e,0: INK #2,7; BORDER #2.1,7,0,3: PAPER 

#0,0: INK #0,4 

9232 FOR f"0,l,2; CLS#f 

9234 END DEFine 

9236 DEFine PROCedure savCdrive,names1 
9238 DELETE ”n)dv”adrivea" "anameS 
9240 SAUE "indv"8drivea"_"anameS 
9242 DIR "mdv*adrlvea" " 

9244 END DEFine 

9246 DEFine PROCedure OLS 

9240 W1ND0W#0,512,60,0,206: INK#0,4:PAPER 

#0,0;UIN00U) 256,206,257,0; PAPER 2: INK 7: BOR 
DER l,255:MiINDaMI#E,25B,B0B,0,0:PAPER#2,7; IN 
K#2,0:6PRDER#2,1,255 
9250 CLS#0;CLS:CLS#2 
9252 END DEFine 



1 REMark QtoRAMl Loadar 

2 REMark Courtesy Berry Ashfield in QUANTA 

4 RESTORE 14 

5 3tart-RESPRtl024):chBck3um-0 

6 FOR f-start TO start+273 

7 READ byte:POKE f,byts 

6 checksum~chBckeuni+byts 

9 NEXT f 

10 IF checksumo21753; PRINT "error in data 
STOP 

11 DELETE mdvl_qtoraml 

12 5EXEC mdvl_qtoraml.start,280,256 

13 PRINT "QtoRAm saved ok": STOP 


14 

15 

16 
17 
IB 

19 

20 
21 




24 




27 

20 

29 

30 

31 



33 

34 

35 

36 

37 
36 

39 

40 

41 


DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 


96,14,0,0,0,0,74,251,0,6 

61,95,114,97,109,49,112,11,114,255 

116,127,70,65,65,250,0,200,112,1 

114,255,110,1,70,66,74,120,103,4 

96,0,0,172,73,250,0,216,40,136 

67,250,0,214,112,71.116,14,110,255 

70,67,74,120,103,4,96,0,0,146 

67,250,0,194,34,17,112,24,116,255 

70,65,74,120,103.4,96,0,0,126 

73,250,0,166,40,136,34,72,110,255 

32,122,0,160,112,72,75,250,0,150 

36,21,70,07,74,120,103,4,96,0 

0,94,112,2,70,66,65,250,0,110 

112,1,114,255,110,2,70,66,74,128 

103,4,96,0,0,70,73,250,0,114 

40,136,112,73,75,250,0,110,36,21 

110,255,34.122,0,94,70,67,74,120 

103,4,96,0,0,40,67,250,0,00 

112,70,78,67,74,120,103,4,96,0 

0,24,112,2,70,66,32,122,0,60 

112,25,70.65.74.57,0,2,120,230 

102,240,96,12,32,124.0,1,0,1 
52,120,0,204,79,146,114,255,112,5 
110.0.78,65,0.10,109,100,110,49 
95,113,117,105,100,100,0.10,114,97 
100,49,95,113,117,105,100,100,0,0 
0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0 , 0,0 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0.0,0,0 



100 REMark QDTG Loader 

105 REMark Courtesy Derek Wilson in QUANTA 

110 C-RESPRC1003 

120 FOR 1-0 TO 60 STEP 2 

130 READ X: POKE^U i+C,x 

140 END FOR i 

150 5EXEC mdv2_DDTG,C.100,256 
1000 DATA 29439.29697,29693,20033.17402 
1010 DATA 40,13944.200,20115.12040 
1020 DATA 20691,20033,17402,74,-27690 
1030 DATA 13944.238,20115,0279,-11314 
1040 DATA 13944,200,20115,16961,169B2 
1050 DATA 30463,26600.20035,24794 
1060 DATA 0,7,240,10,168.246 


40 




SPECTRUM SOFTWARE 


# « * # 


PACKAGE SPECIALS 


* 4 # 


DLAN 

$14.95 

Zombie 

$14.95 

Buy 1 ROM Switch at Regular Price 

Rebel Star Raider 

$5.00 

Green Berets 

$15.95 

and get 2 FREE Magazines OR 1 

Make A Chip 

$5.95 

Snowman 

$9.95 

FREE Program of Our Choice. 

Dynamite Dan 

$11.95 

Great Space Race 

$12.95 



They Sold A Million 

$18.95 

Ram bo 

$14.95 

Buy 3 of the $3 T/S 1000 SW for $8 

The Planets 

$18.95 

Quazatron 

$16.95 



Delta Wing 

$9.95 

One Man And His Droid 

$9.95 

Buy 3 of the $2 T/S 1000 S/W for $5 

Chiller 

$9.95 

Skyranger 

$12.95 



ACE 

$17.95 

Bo m bj ac k 

$14.95 

Buy 3 of the $6 JfS 2068 S/W FOR $15 

Cauldron II 

$16.95 

Jack The Nipper 

$14.95 



NOW Games 

$16.95 

Max Headroom 

$16.95 

Buy 3 of the $2 T/S 2068 S/W for $5 

Paper Boy 

$14.95 

Dynamite Dan II 

$14.95 





And More-Write for Free Catalogl 





— T/S 2068 SOFTWARE 

— 



Xadom 

$6.00 

Bugaboo 

$6.00 

Spelling 

$2.00 

Mined Out 

$6.00 

Timegate 

$6.00 

States & Caps 

$2.00 

Saboteur 

$15.95 

Fighter Pilot 

$15.95 

Horace & The Spiders 

$2.00 

Tasword Keyboard Overlay 

$5.95 

Mscript Keyboard Overlay 

$5.95 

Fun Golf 

$2.00 

ROM Switch 

$45.00 

ACZ General Ledger 

$24.95 

Stock Market Sim. 

$2.00 

3D Strategy 

$6.00 

Speed King Joystick 

$17.95 

And More ' Write for Free Catalog 



- T/S 1000 SOFTWARE 

— 



2040 Paper for 3 rolls 

$6.95 

Red Alert 

$3,00 

3D Grand Prix 

$2.00 

Munchees 

$3.00 

Croaka-Crawler 

$3.00 

Vegas/Jeopardy 

$2.00 

PioneerTrail 

$3.00 

T/S Destroyer 

$3.00 

ZXDB (as is) 

$2.00 

Stock Market Calculator 

$3.00 

Alpha Vowels 

$3.00 

Graphic Golf 

$3.00 

Rocket Man 

$3.00 

ZXtricator 

$3.00 

Forty Niner 

$3.00 

Carpooler 

$2.00 

Kasino Kraps 

$2.00 

Tarot 

$2.00 

Backgammon 

$2.00 

The Gambler 

$2.00 

And More - Write for Free Catalog 



— BOOKS AND MAGAZINES — 



Hackers Handbook 

$11.95 

The Sinclair Story 

$12.95 

Sinclair User 

S4.00 

Guide to the Hobbit 

$6.95 

Putting Your Spectum to Work 

$5.95 

Computer & Video Games 

$4.00 

Beginners Guide to FORTH 

$6.95 

Mastering M,C. on the ZX61 

$8-95 

Your Computer 

$4.00 

Great. Arcade Games/Spectrum 

$5.95 

Delving Deeper / Spectrum 

$7.95 

QL World 

$4.00 

49 Explosive Games on the ZX81 

$6.95 

Spectrum M.G. Made Easy M 

$10.95 

3 mags shipped at one time 

3/$10.95 

Replicating Reality 

$12.95 

Database Primer 

$10-95 

{some back issues available.) 


Great. Adventures on Spectrum 

$7.95 

Using a Modem W/Your Computer 

$12.95 



60 Programs for Spectrum 

$12.95 

101 Things to do W/Dead Compt 

$5.95 

And More * Write for Free Catalog 


* FREE S/H on all Software. 

Add .75 on Books if ordering alone - 

FREE S/H if ordering with Software. 



Add $1 S/H on ROM Switch, Speed King Joystick and on 2040 Paper Packs. 


All Software or Software/Book orders over 



are shipped via UPS 2nd Day Air FREE (Cont. U.S. Only.) 




Please Write or Call for a FREE Catalog for Timex/Spectrum; QL or Atari ST Software, Hardware and Peripherials 

Toll Free ORDER Line: 1-800-628-2820 Ext. 950 24 hrs. a day, 7 days a week. 

Call for Info on our "VIDEO CATALOG" of software. 


P.O. Box 5607 


West 


Glendale, Arizona 85312-5607 

Suite B-10 


1-602-978-2902 • Telex (via WUI): 6501267701 
Phoenix, Arizona 
















THE PC TALKER 

An exciting new Hardware item for the QL Plugs into the Ser2 port. Utilizing 
some very special speech chips TALKER can say practically anything you type, and 
the “voice” is very understandable. 


Extremely easy to program using PRINT statement. A demo program is includ¬ 
ed when you purchase TALKER. 

TALKER is professionally housed in black ABS plastic. It comes with a 90 day 
warranty and includes its own power supply. 

PC TALKER is $64.95 plus $2.95 s/h. 

CONCEPT 3D 

A completely interactive program. All functions and choices are called with 
single key entry. All required information and prompts are displayed on screen when 
required. We like to think of the program as a “3D Graphics Processor” since many 
of the functions are much like those of a good word processor. 












•\v 


^ S 








% I.H 




.'.W.sWWV 




\S 


S s 


I s 




S I 










s\ 









• f - 't\\ 


^\\W 


vV ;s 


.rO S.'*. 


m 




ss 


• • Lk s i|* V s * •X'i l \ I • k^kV* ^ ■> 




swwm^ 




* I 






W 


I. * i V 












s's 




CSV’A \V 


s • 






a * n 


s\s 


'vv 


V • ^ 


.vJ.xWV 


.V'‘V 

w .m 


I tv 



• ”s •' ■■ ':n\v v'*; ‘%VS 

i-k ...L'k^vVi.* *..s. V A'kS.^ \S.\V . . V. ..•?* .vV .. i • V . . -^.4.0_‘ \ . 






.\A 


«l k 





•;?' x;;;'^co-, . --.v.vX:-■.x•• ■ • ■ \X;X'.vvx' n'av'X^X' vx : 





“The United States has small 
part of the QL pie but, if quality 
products such as Concept 3D 
continue to come from the 
country which owns Silicon 
Valley, the American software 
houses concerned should con¬ 
gratulate themselves.” 

Sinclair User 
Oct. 1986 


Call our Toll Free ORDER Line to order either of these fine products. 
1-800-628-2828 ext. 950 24 hrs. a day - 7 days a week. Or cal 11-602-978-2902 
for more information on our catalog. 


I 















We know the QL...We’ve been appreciating it longer. 



- QL GAMES• 


The Lost Pharaoh 

$24.95 

Baron Rouge 

$16.95 

Karate 

$24.95 

Dragonhold 

$29.95 

Vroom 

$24.95 

Hyperdrive 

$19.95 

Othello 

$24.95 

Early Learning 

$24.95 

Flight Simulator 

$29.95 

Mortville’s Manor 

$34.95 

Sqadrons 

$29.95 

BJ in 3D Land 

$19.95 

Presidents 

$14.95 

3D Slime 

$19.95 

Bounder 

$24.95 

Wanderer 

$34.95 

QL Chess 

$34.95 

Knight Flight 

$24.95 

- QL GRAPHICS - 


- QL UTILITIES - 


- MISC. PROGRAMS 

1*1 

GraphlQL 

$34.95 

Screen Dump (Epson Compal.t 

$15.95 

QSpell 

$29.95 

TenchniQL 

$69.95 

Choice Cartridge (us«wice) 

$22.95 

Assembler Workbench 

$39.95 

Concept 3D 

$39.95 

l.C.E. ROM Cartridge 

$34.95 

QL Mail Merge 

$24.95 

QL Pientre 

$29.95 

RAM Disk Software 

$24.95 

Nucleon 

$34.95 

Graphic Toolkit 

$29.95 

QCode-Terminal S/W 

$29.95 

Superchecking 

$14.95 



Cartridge Doctor 

$23.95 

Cosmos 

$24.95 



• QL HARDWARE AND ACCESS. • 



Thompson Case hoios i 2 carts, 

$2.50 

Talker • Speech Synthesizer 

$64.95 

Monochrome Cable 

$14.95 

Avatex Modem 300/1200 

$109.95 

RS232 Cable 

$14.95 

RGB Cable 

$16.95 

512K RAM Expansion 

CALL 

Modem Cable 

$15.95 

Cumana Disk l/F 

CALL 



• QL BOOKS AND MAGAZINES - 



Adv. Programming on the QL $12.95 

Introduction to Super BAS 1C $12,95 

QL Computing 

$9.95 

Word Processing on the QL 

$12.95 

Desktop Computing on the QL $12.95 

QLSuperBASIC 

$11.95 

Using Graphics on the QL 

$12.95 

Profiting from the QL 

$12.95 

QL Report per Year... 

$15.00 

Machine Code Prog, on the QL$ 12.95 

Database Mgmt. on the QL 

$12.95 

QL World 

$4.00 

Making the Most of the QL 

$12.95 

Quantum Theory 

$11.95 

Sinclair User 

$4.00 

QL Games Master 

$12.95 

QL Adventure Handbook 

$9.95 

Your Computer 

$4.00 



- FOR BRITISH QLs ONLY - 



Backgammon 

$24.95 

Early Learning 

$24.95 

Flight Navigation 

$24.95 

Mortville's Manor 

$34.95 

CAD Pak 

$24.95 

Joystick Adapter 

$14.95 


FREE Shipping on all Software. Add .75 per Book if ordering alone - FREE S/H if ordering with Software 
Add $2.95 for Modem and Talker; $1 for Cables. 

All Software of Software/Book orders over $50 are shipped via UPS 2nd Day Air FREE {Cont. U.S. Only) 
Please Write or Call for a FREE Catalog for QL; Timex/Spectrum or Atari Software, Hardware and Peripherals. 
Toll Free ORDER Line: 1-800-628-2828 ext. 950 24 hrs a day - 7 days a week. 

P.O. Box 5607 • Glendale, Arizona 85312-5607 • 1-602-978-2902 • Telex {via WUI): 6501267701 
OFFICE: 2412 West Creenway • Suite B-10 • Phoenix, Arizona 









FREE ADS FOR SUBSCRIBERS 

HOW VJILL TAX REFORM AFFECT YOU? 


Calculate 87/ 


89 tax. 


current or future data. Include 


itemizing, 


business. 2068 


. $5 ppd. Max Schoenfeld, 
2612 Princeton, Cleveland/ 
44118. 


MONEY MACHINE 


starring BANNA 


BRITE! All new format, Banna turns 
the letters. The Ultimate Word 
Game for TS 2068 from ABBA SOFT. 
$12.00 postpaid. Herb Bowers, 2588 
Woodshire Circle, Chesapeake, 


WANTED: INTERCOMPUTER QSAVE 
loading system for TS 1000. Also 
any TS 1000 hardware working or 
not. Want to swap software? Send 
me your list. Dan Elliott, 


Box 


Cabool, MO 65689 


FOR SALE: RAMEX MILLENIA K DDI. 


Retail- $200.00 - 
Also, Tasman C CPI 
call with best 


call with offer 
- retail 

. Bill Nemitz 


. Golf Ave., Ottumwa, Iowa 

52501. (515) 683-1367. 


WANTED: HUNTER BOARD and/or other 

have you's". Contact: 
Fred Henn, c/o Rockelman 


Henn 


Pump Co./ Inc./ 1333 Military Rd., 
Buffalo, 


CLOSEOUTl!! TS 1000 SOFTWARE from 

99c. Box 2382, La Jolla, 
92038. 


2068 SOFTWARE: Send S.A.S.E. for 


FREE CATALOG 
1907 1/2 W. 
NY 13204. 


m 


TIMEWARE, INC., 

Stw 


FOR SALE: 


, Sinclair Monitor and 


Printer, Memory boards, software, 
new blank cartridges, various QL 
books, QL technical manual, 
power supplies, ect. Call for 
prices and details, (603) 847-3448 


FOR SALE: SEIKOSHA SP-IOOOA NLQ 
Dot Matrix Printer, 2 Months old 
$130 ppd, UPS, Jerry McKouen, 
2580 Lanier Dr,, Lansing, 

48911, 


FOR SALE: TIMEX SINCLAIR 1000 
Computer in METAL SLOPING CABINET, 
with keyboard, power switch, 

Westridge Modem, Aerco Centronics 
Parallel Interface, Memotech 64k 
RAM, 

library of software including: 


QSAVE, Extended 


Sincartist, 


Memotext WP, Games, Available as 
complete package or by piece, 
interested, please contact: 
Richard Beier, 

Merrick, 


Darwin Dr 


* / 


11566. Leave EMAIL on 


CompuServe U.I.D. #73137, 


SINCUS NEWS- $8/year= 6 issues. 
Heavy on 2068 help, hints and 
programs: Mail check to SINCUS, 

1229 Rhodes Rd., Johnson City, 
13790- a non profit, all volunteer 
user group for 1000/2068 users. 


BOOK 1000/2068 
c program list 


(mostly) 


planations: Grocerylist, Edit 
Writer (wordprocessor) 
tract (accounting), Danceshoes, 
Minutes, Songs (sing-a-long), 
Studygame, Barg (graph-maker) and 
more. Start where 
Send $25 Canadian to: BLUE VIOLET 
PUBLISHING Inc., 1452 Kingsdale, 
Gloucester, Ont., K1T-1G9 Canada, 

for a copy. 


SOFTWARE FOR THE TS 2068. Send 
SASE for FREE CATALOG & price list 
to: E. Ray Rash, 2424 SW 78th St., 
Oklahoma City, OK 73159 


Do 


ad in THE CLASSIFIEDS! Subscribers can place one free personal ad in each issue. Ad size i 

_ _ _ A- M H H IB -H- B. B _^B^B- M 1^ 


2040 


paper) 


DEADLINE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADS: Two weeks before publication date. Mail your ad to 

_ m ^ m ■ B jnt 4 


TIME DESIGNS 












































































NEW PRODUCTS 

For TS2068 and SPECTRUM 


• PuU-Down Menus 

• Several Brushes 

• Spray 

• Auto-Fill 

• Zoom 

• Undo 

• Several Text Fonts 

• Cut & Paste Windows 


VERSION 1,1 

* Auto-Speed Control 

* Magnify & Reduce 

* Rotate 3l Mirror 

* Full Attribute Control 

* Fully Elastic Shapes including Circle^ 
Box, Triangle, Ray and Line 

* Fast Ellipse and Arc 


■ Includes Spectrum & TS206S Versions 

• Supports Microdrives and Kempston 
Joystick 

• Includes GALLERY, the slide 

show/animator 

• 5 Samples of Artwork 

■ Excellent Manual 


Unshackle your creativity with ... ARTWORXII 

ARTWORX Vl.l - S 19.95 U.S, plus S3.00 S & H 


REVOLUTIONARY NEW BASIC COMPILER... 


The dream of every BASIC programmer has now been realized! 


* TIMACHINE will turn your BASIC 
into super-fast machine code, 
running up to 200 times fastcrl 

* Handles floating point operations 
like SIN, COS, TAN 


* Handles all BASIC except I/O 

* Includes an excellent manual and 
4 demonstration proirams 

* Compiles up to 27fC in seconds 

* Includes Spectrum A 206S versions 


Super-Charge your BASIC programs with.., T/M/lC/f/NE/ 


TIMACHINE — 119.95 U.S. Plus S3.00 S A H 



■C3 




• T I 




A unique combination of planning aids, decision tools, and util I lies 


Schedule r/Pianner 
Notepad 

Telephfxw Book 

programmable Calculalor 

Decision Factoring 
Real Time Qock 


* Biorhythms 

" Perpetual Calendar 

* International Time Zones 

* Superb Manual 

* Includes Spectrum & TS2068 
Ve r$ ions 

* Supports Microdrives 


A TIMELY ADDITION TO YOUR SOFTWARE UBRARY...THE WORX! 


519 95 U.S. Plus S3.00SS.H 


(lovel/oFt 

A FORMAT FOR THE FUTURE 


106 Seventh Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M8V 3B4 • TEL. (416)259-8682 • CompuServe 70416,1435 




















































WEYMIL presents... 

A small collection of truly innovative products for Sinclair computers 



THRUST TSIOOO 

True hi-rcs graphics for the TS 1000. THRUST m two 

great progrtims on one tape. Sine-Artist L3 is the most 
user friendly software ever developed for printer 
graphics. Completely cursor and menu driven. For 
Hunter Board users, there's Sine-Artist HR which pro¬ 
duces fantastic screen graphics. THRUST is both the 
most sophisticated and easiest to use hi-res graphics 
software ever developed for the TS 1000* If you are 
ready for no-nonsense* hassle free graphics, then 
THRUST is a '"must have.” 

THRUST for the TS 1000 only S20.00 

ARTVVORX VI,1 TS 2068 

England's finest graphics packagel ARTWORX Vl.l 
establishes a new standard for color graphics with 
features never before available on small systems* Auto 
speed control, pull down menus* unique cut and past 
windows* ZOOM!, elastic shapes* multiple fonts* 
CENTRONICS I/F capability for full-size print-outs* 
and more* All this plus an absolutely uncluttered 
screen for full creativity* Easy to use. The joystick 
controls EVERYHTING except text entry. The highly 
supportive well-written documentation is almost un- 
nessesary* 

ARTWORX VLl for the TS2068 only $19*95 

PIXEL SKETCH AND GRAPHICS 
EDITOR V2.0 TS 2068 

This program by Stan Lemke stiU remains the finest 
graphics program produced in the United States and 
one of the best in the world for the TS 206S, It has had 
cxccUenruser group reviews and is a snap to use* Well 
written, stcp-by-sicp documentation guides you ef¬ 
fortlessly from loading to producing you own 
"masterpiece*" Great pixel and text placement contol. 

PIXEL SKETCH AND GRAPHICS EDfTOR V2*0 
only $19.95 

KRUNCHER TS 2068 / TS 1000 

From the Pacific Northwest comes one of the most ex- 
dling utliites ever written. KRUNCHER takes any 
BASIC program for the TS 2068 or TS 1000 and in¬ 
stantly reduces it to the tightest BASIC possible 
thereby conserving precious memory. Imagine all of 

those little memory saving tips developed over the 
years in one program which ^rforms automatically 

and takes up less than 190 bytesf Simply load KRUN¬ 
CHER, locate it where you want it* load or write your 
BASIC progrm, invoke KRUNCHER* blink your eye 
and it's done* Memory savings average 20-40^»* Great 
learning aid for programmers of all levels. 

KRUNCHER for TSIOOO or TS2068 only $10.00 
fPlease specify TSIOOO or TS2068) 


TIME MACHINE TS 2068 

The first SERIOUS COMPILER for the TS2068. Now 
you can convert BASIC programs to super fast 
MACHINE CODE without a lot of hassle. Converts 
both TS 2068 and SPECTRUM Programs. It func¬ 
tions as both an integer and floating point compiler 
simultaneously without the restrictions of dther* Com¬ 
piled code can be placed anywhere in RAM* Handles 
up to 27K of BASIC. Programs can be either written 
or loaded from tape* You've wainted a long time for 
this one and here it isl 

TIME MACHINE for the TS2068 only $19.95 

RIGTER JOYSTICK INTERFACE TS 1000 

This is a software programmable Atari-type joystick 
interface, it can handle up to 16 different directions or 
commands easily. It has it's own self-contained 
memory so that it's software occupies no system ram. 
The software allows you to configure your joystick to 
ANY TSIOOO game or graphic software (THRUST* 
for example) and it's ready to go* Rear expansion bus 
allows other peripherals and the interface is completely 
transparent* 

RIGTER JOYSTICK INTERFACE for TS iOOO 
only $39.95 

MINI XMOD TS 1000 

Use your TSIOOO and West ridge modem to 
up/download TSIOOO software to any XMODEM BBS 
and see them run* Supports Memotech Centronics I/F 
and others for print-outs to full size printers. Standard 
RAM and Hunter Board versions included on same 
tape. 

MINI XMOD for the TS 1000 only $20.00 

LOADER V TS 2068 

This program turns MTERM into a REAL com¬ 
munications program* Here's what you get. Auto¬ 
repeat dialing, extra 20 number dialing directory, full 
TASWORD U and MSCRIPT text file handling 
capability, disk drive and Wafer drive compatible, 
multiple loading of Mterm's buffer while on line, and 
full XMODEM capability. This program is the COM¬ 
PLETE LOADER SERIES. 

LOADER V for TS 2068 only $10.00 

CLONE TS 2068 

A sophisticated program which allows the user to 
make back-up copies of ANY TS2068 or SPECTRUM 
software for their own use* Requires no fancy filters or 
extra tape recorders. Easy to follow instructions make 
it simple to protect your valuable originals. 

CLONE for the T52068 only $10*00 




SPECIAL OFFER!!! 

Save $5.00 when you order the combination of THRUST, RIGTER JOYSTICK INTERFACE, and KRUNCHER 1000 
you pay only $64.95 

SHIPPING INSTRUCTIONS Please enclose $2.00 shipping and handling with your order. 

WEYMIL CORPORATION 

BOX 5904 

BELLINGHAM, WA 98227—5904